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1.
BMC Geriatr ; 24(1): 409, 2024 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38720258

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aims to (1) determine the reliability and validity of the interRAI Chinese Self-reported Carer Needs (SCaN) assessment among informal Chinese caregivers of older adults, (2) identify predictors of caregiving distress in Asian regions with long-standing Confucian values of filial piety and family responsibility. METHODS: This cross-sectional study recruited 531 informal Chinese caregivers of older adults in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Taiwan, and Singapore. The scale reliability was examined using Cronbach's alphas (α) and McDonald's omega coefficient (ω). The concurrent validity and discriminant validity were assessed using Spearman rank correlations (rho). To examine the predictors of caregiving distress among informal caregivers of older adults, we employed hierarchical linear regression analyses informed by the Model of Carer Stress and Burden and categorized the predictors into six domains. RESULTS: Results revealed good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.83-0.96) and concurrent validity (rho = 0.45-0.74) of the interRAI Chinese SCaN assessment. Hierarchical linear regression analysis revealed that entering the background factors, primary stressors, secondary stressors, appraisal, and exacerbating factors all significantly enhanced the model's predictability, indicating that the source of caregiving distress is multidimensional. In the full model, caregivers with longer informal care time, lack of support from family and friends, have unmet needs, experience role overload, have sleep problems, and low IADL functioning are at a higher risk of caregiving distress. CONCLUSIONS: The interRAI Chinese SCaN Assessment was found to be a reliable and valid tool among the Chinese informal caregivers of older adults. It would be useful for determining family caregivers' strengths, needs, and challenges, and tailoring interventions that address the potentially modifiable factors associated with caregiving distress and maximize support. Healthcare providers working in home and community settings should be aware of the early identification of caregiving distress and routine assessment of their needs and empower them to continue taking care of their needs and providing adequate care to the care recipient.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Needs Assessment , Self Report , Humans , Caregivers/psychology , Male , Female , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , China/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Reproducibility of Results , Aged, 80 and over , Adult , Taiwan/epidemiology , East Asian People
2.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302597, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722888

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, has significantly impacted the psychological and physical health of a wide range of individuals, including healthcare professionals (HCPs). This umbrella review aims provide a quantitative summary of meta-analyses that have investigated the prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance among HCPs during the COVID-19 pandemic. An umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses reviews was conducted. The search was performed using the EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar databases from 01st January 2020 to 15th January 2024. A random-effects model was then used to estimate prevalence with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analyses were then conducted to explore the heterogeneity of the sample. Seventy-two meta-analyses involved 2,308 primary studies were included after a full-text review. The umbrella review revealed that the pooled prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance among HCPs during the COVID-19 pandemic was 37% (95% CI 32.87-41.22), 31.8% (95% CI 29.2-34.61) 29.4% (95% CI 27.13-31.84) 36.9% (95% CI 33.78-40.05) respectively. In subgroup analyses the prevalence of anxiety and depression was higher among nurses than among physicians. Evidence from this umbrella review suggested that a significant proportion of HCPs experienced stress, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance during the COVID-19 pandemic. This information will support authorities when implementing specific interventions that address mental health problems among HCPs during future pandemics or any other health crises. Such interventions may include the provision of mental health support services, such as counseling and peer support programs, as well as the implementation of organizational strategies to reduce workplace stressors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Health Personnel , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Meta-Analysis as Topic
3.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10688, 2024 05 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724683

ABSTRACT

Diabetes-related distress (DRD) refers to the psychological distress specific to living with diabetes. DRD can lead to negative clinical consequences such as poor self-management. By knowing the local prevalence and severity of DRD, primary care teams can improve the DRD evaluation in our daily practice. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 3 General Out-patient Clinics (GOPCs) from 1 December 2021 to 31 May 2022. A random sample of adult Chinese subjects with T2DM, who regularly followed up in the selected clinic in the past 12 months, were included. DRD was measured by the validated 15-item Chinese version of the Diabetes Distress Scale (CDDS-15). An overall mean score ≥ 2.0 was considered clinically significant. The association of DRD with selected clinical and personal factors was investigated. The study recruited 362 subjects (mean age 64.2 years old, S.D. 9.5) with a variable duration of living with T2DM (median duration 7.0 years, IQR 10.0). The response rate was 90.6%. The median HbA1c was 6.9% (IQR 0.9). More than half (59.4%) of the subjects reported a clinically significant DRD. Younger subjects were more likely to have DRD (odds ratio of 0.965, 95% CI 0.937-0.994, p = 0.017). Patients with T2DM in GOPCs commonly experience clinically significant DRD, particularly in the younger age group. The primary care clinicians could consider integrating the evaluation of DRD as a part of comprehensive diabetes care.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Primary Health Care , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/psychology , Middle Aged , Male , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Aged , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Risk Factors
4.
Psychooncology ; 33(5): e6343, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38697780

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: It is widely acknowledged that emotional states can influence skin conditions, yet limited research has delved into the impact of stress on skin cancer development. This retrospective study sought to expand the perspective on skin cancer risk factors by investigating the complex relationship between stressful life events and the incidence of skin cancer. METHODS: The sample included 268 individuals followed-up in a dermatological clinic, in three groups: Patients who had previously been diagnosed with cutaneous melanoma and are currently in remission (32%), those who had been diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer (30%), and a control group who are at risk for skin cancer (38%). Participants filled in questionnaires regarding childhood and adulthood life events, and loss and gain of resources following their subjectively most stressful event in adulthood. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the associations of life events with skin cancer occurrence, and mediating and moderating effects of resource loss/gain. RESULTS: Adverse childhood experiences were associated with melanoma occurrence, with the melanoma group reporting significantly more such experiences compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Resource loss from subjectively significant stressful life events in adulthood partially mediated the association between adverse childhood experiences and melanoma incidence. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that there may be intricate connections between stress, life events, adaptation to change, and skin cancer, which future research may further unravel. This study underscores the need for a more comprehensive approach to stress management, coping strategies development, and skin cancer prevention in healthcare settings.


Subject(s)
Life Change Events , Melanoma , Skin Neoplasms , Stress, Psychological , Humans , Female , Male , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/psychology , Middle Aged , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Melanoma/epidemiology , Melanoma/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Adult , Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Incidence , Risk Factors , Adaptation, Psychological , Adverse Childhood Experiences/statistics & numerical data
5.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302266, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38701039

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mothers faced an increased risk of adverse mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to other populations. However, there is little data on the factors that placed mothers at increased risk of distress. AIMS: The present study explored a range of individual, familial, and environmental factors associated with psychological distress in mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: This repeated cross-sectional study was composed of a convenience sample of mothers who completed an online survey that included a demographic questionnaire, an emotion regulation questionnaire, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress scale. The survey was administered during the second and third lockdowns in Israel in 2020-2021. RESULTS: The study included 575 mothers (M age = 39). The findings of a hierarchical regression indicated that individual-level factors, composed of age and emotion regulation tendencies predicted psychological distress. The family-level factors of household income and number of children in the family also predicted distress. In terms of environmental-level factors, COVID-19-related media consumption and school status (open or closed) were also significant predictors of psychological distress. Importantly, the results showed that the most important predictors of psychological distress in mothers during the COVID-19 outbreak were school closures, household income, and the use of adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the intersection of individual, familial, and environmental factors in mothers' mental health during crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Psychological Distress , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Adult , Mothers/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Israel/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Emotional Regulation
6.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302020, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38701106

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic changed the future of work sustainably and led to a general increase in mental stress. A study conducted during the second and third pandemic wave with a retrospective survey of the first wave among 1,545 non-healthcare workers confirmed an increase in anxiety and depression symptoms and showed a correlation with the occupational SARS-CoV-2 infection risk. This online follow-up survey aims to examine changes in mental distress as the pandemic progressed in Germany and to identify factors influencing potential changes. METHODS: Longitudinal data from 260 subjects were available for this analysis. Mental distress related to anxiety and depression symptoms, assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4), and occupational risk factors were solicited at the end of 2022 and retrospectively at the fifth wave. Categorized PHQ-4 scores were modelled with mixed ordinal regression models and presented with odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: A previous diagnosis of a depressive or anxiety disorder was a strong risk factor for severe symptoms (OR 3.49, 95% CI 1.71-7.11). The impact of occupational SARS-CoV-2 infection risk on mental distress was increased, albeit failing to reach the formal level of statistical significance (high risk OR 1.83, 95% CI 0.59-5.63; probable risk OR 1.72, 95% CI 0.93-3.15). Mental distress was more pronounced in those with a previous diagnosis of anxiety and depression. Confirmed occupational risk factors were protective measures against occupational SARS-CoV-2 infection perceived as inadequate, chronic work-related stress, overcommitment, reduced interactions with fellow-workers, and work-privacy conflicts. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic had a negative impact on anxiety and depression symptoms among the studied non-healthcare workers, particularly early in the pandemic, although this effect does not appear to be permanent. There are modifiable risk factors that can protect workers' mental health, including strengthening social interactions among employees and reducing work-privacy conflicts.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Germany/epidemiology , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Longitudinal Studies
7.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 58: e20230290, 2024.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38743956

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe and analyze the relationship between pregnancy-related anxiety, prenatal distress, and individual resilience in pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy and compare it with the obstetric variable of parity. METHOD: Quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study using non-probabilistic circumstantial sampling. A total of 144 women participated. The Prenatal Distress Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, and the Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire were used. A descriptive analysis with measures of central tendency was performed, and the reliability of the instruments was assessed. RESULTS: The average age was 33.57 years. 58.3% were multiparous and 41.7% primiparous. Anxiety was found in 21.5% and very high levels of resilience in 54.9%. Primiparous women showed higher levels of worry about the future and fear of childbirth than multiparous women. Pregnant women with high resilience showed lower levels of anxiety and stress. CONCLUSION: Pregnant women with higher levels of resilience show less anxiety and stress during the first trimester of pregnancy. Primiparous women show more anxiety and stress than multiparous women.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Pregnancy Complications , Pregnancy Trimester, First , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Pregnancy Trimester, First/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Young Adult , Parity , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0297169, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38713693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study examined the potential influence of pre-pandemic psychological resilience on use of approach or avoidant coping styles and strategies to manage stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesized that higher resilience would be associated with more approach coping and less avoidant coping. DESIGN AND METHODS: Longitudinal cohort data were from the Nurses' Health Study II, including 13,143 female current and former healthcare professionals with pre-pandemic lifetime trauma. Pre-pandemic resilience was assessed between 2018-2019 and current coping during the outbreak of the pandemic in the United States (May-August 2020). Multiple linear regression model results identified associations between continuous pre-pandemic resilience scores and use of approach and avoidant coping styles, as well as individual coping strategies, adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Greater resilience was associated with higher use of approach coping (ß = 0.06, 95% CI 0.05, 0.08) and lower use of avoidant coping styles (ß = -0.39, 95% CI -0.41, -0.38). Higher pre-pandemic resilience was also associated with use of eight (distraction [ß = -0.18, 95% CI -0.20, -0.16], substance use [ß = -0.15, 95% CI -0.17, -0.13], behavioral disengagement [ß = -0.29, 95% CI -0.30, -0.27], self-blame [ß = -0.44, 95% CI -0.45, -0.42], emotional support (ß = 0.03, 95% CI 0.01, 0.05), positive reframing [ß = 0.13, 95% CI 0.12, 0.15], humor [ß = 0.03, 95% CI 0.01, 0.05] and religion [ß = 0.06, 95% CI 0.04, 0.08]) of the nine coping strategies in expected directions. CONCLUSION: Findings have important implications for intervention or even prevention efforts to support vulnerable groups, such as women with prior trauma histories, during this and other immensely stressful times. Supporting or building psychological resilience following trauma may promote effective coping in times of future stress.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
9.
Inquiry ; 61: 469580241248124, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38712804

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has presented a globally challenging situation for human physical and mental health. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are affected by increased levels of anxiety, stress, and insomnia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of COVID-19 on HCWs anxiety, stress, and insomnia levels. This cross-sectional study employed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Perceived Stress Scale 10, and Insomnia Severity Index to assess anxiety, stress, and insomnia among HCWs at 10 COVID-19 isolation and treatment hospitals/centers after the first COVID-19 wave in Jordan. A web-based survey was used to collect data from 183 participants. Statistical analysis of factors affecting the mean scores of anxiety, stress, and insomnia was carried using student t-test or ANOVA while factors associated with differences in anxiety, stress, and insomnia frequencies were tested using Chi-square/Fisher exact test. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent risk factors. Among participants, 97.3% reported moderate to severe levels of stress, 68% reported borderline to high abnormal levels of anxiety, and 32% had moderate to severe insomnia. The mean of anxiety total score was 9.8 ± 4.8, stress total score was 22.7 ± 4.5, and insomnia total score was 11.0 ± 7.1. Significant positive correlations were noted between anxiety, stress, and insomnia (P < .005). Female gender, migraine, less working years, increased time spent with patients, lower workforce, clinical insomnia and high stress were significant independent factors associated with anxiety (P < .05). Younger age, being single or divorced, heart disease, smoking, occupation (nurses), lower workforce, vaccination dose, and anxiety were significant independent factors associated with insomnia (P < .05). Increased time spent with patients, lower workforce, lower spouse and colleagues support, sadness due to isolation and anxiety were significant independent factors associated with stress. HCWs at COVID-19 centers had high levels of stress, anxiety, and insomnia. Appropriate interventions to maintain HCWs mental health are recommended.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Male , Female , Adult , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Jordan/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Depression/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Risk Factors , Health Personnel/psychology
10.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 594, 2024 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38714981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Student midwives deliver care for women under challenging job demands, which may affect their mental health- thus creating a high need for health promotion. Given the lack of research addressing this topic, the aim of this study is to examine the links between stress perception, coping behaviors, work-privacy conflict, and perception of COVID-19 pandemic impact on studies of student midwives in northern Germany. METHODS: Data were collected using a cross-sectional online-survey at nine midwifery study sites in northern Germany from October 2022 to January 2023. 342 student midwives (response rate: 61.3%) were surveyed on stress perception, coping behaviors, work-privacy conflict, and perceived impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their studies. Descriptive, linear regression and moderation analyses were run to test explorative assumptions. RESULTS: Results revealed that higher levels of perceived stress were reported by 13.4% of student midwives. Social support (M = 13.76, SD = 2.19) and active stress coping (M = 10.72, SD = 2.01) were identified as most prevalent coping behaviors in the present sample. It was found that work-privacy conflict was positively associated with stress perception (ß = 0.53, p =.001) and maladaptive coping behaviors (alcohol and cigarette consumption: ß = 0.14, p =.015), and negatively associated with adaptive coping behaviors (positive thinking: ß = - 0.25, p =.001, social support: ß = - 0.23, p =.001). Students with children reported significantly lower levels of social support than students without children. 55.6% of student midwives perceived a negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their studies (mostly on lectures, seminars, and contact with fellow students). CONCLUSIONS: Key findings highlighted moderate stress levels among student midwives during theoretical study stage. Based on current research, prevalence of high stress levels among student midwives remains unclear. Given the overall heterogeneous, limited research on student midwives' stress perception, coping behaviors, work-privacy conflict and perceptions of COVID-19 pandemic impact on studies, implications for research are suggested, e.g. longitudinal studies at different time points and settings and interventional studies. Findings provide a starting point for implementation of workplace health promotion in theoretical and practical stages of midwifery science study programs, e.g. training courses on stress prevention and adaptive coping, and for improvement of working conditions.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Midwifery , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Germany/epidemiology , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Students, Nursing/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Male , Coping Skills
11.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 53(1): 47-54, 2024.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724170

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The prolongation and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have led to an uncertain and devastating panorama in many populations, and the evidence shows a high prevalence of mental health problems in medical students. The objective was to evaluate the association between mood disorders and sleep quality (SQ) in Peruvian medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 310 medical students from a private university in Peru. The SQ was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), while mood disorders were evaluated using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21). All information was collected by online surveys and then analysed in the R programming language. RESULTS: The SQ results measured by PSQI were poor in 83.9% of the medical students. In the Poison regression analysis, the results of the bivariate analysis in men show that all mood disorders found the prevalence of poor SQ. However, in the multivariate analysis only stress (PRa=1.30; 95% CI, 1.08-1.57; P<0.01) and anxiety (PRa=1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.56; P <0.01) increased the prevalence of poor SQ. Women had a similar pattern in bivariate analysis, whereas in multivariate analysis, only severe stress (PRa=1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.29; P <0.05) increased the prevalence of poor SQ. CONCLUSIONS: This study allows us to observe the consequences that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on medical students in Peru. It also revealed a population group vulnerable to poor quality of sleep and bad mood, which in the future will impact on health. It is suggested to educate medical students about the importance of proper sleep hygiene and the consequences of poor sleep hygiene practices.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Mood Disorders , Sleep Quality , Students, Medical , Humans , Peru/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Male , Young Adult , Prevalence , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Adult , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Sex Factors , Adolescent
12.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10171, 2024 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702409

ABSTRACT

Mental health issues are intricately linked to socioeconomic background, employment and migration status. However, there remains a gap in understanding the mental health challenges faced by graduate youth in India, particularly in Kolkata City. This study aims to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety, and stress among higher-educated migrant youth. A survey was conducted on four hundred migrant graduate youths aged 21-35 residing in Kolkata. Measures included socio-demographics and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21). Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression were employed to identify factors associated with mental health issues. The overall prevalence rates were 54.4% for depression, 61.8% for anxiety, and 47.9% for stress. Unemployed youths exhibited significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety than their employed counter parts. The logistic regression model showed that unemployed youth, female sex, never married, and second- and third-time migrant youths were risk factors for high scores on the DASS-21. This study showed that mental health issues were alarming in the higher educated migrant youth. The study suggests the implementation of skill-based, job-oriented, and professional courses at the graduation level to prevent graduates from being rendered unproductive and jobless. Beside these, regular psychological support should be provided to the higher educated youth by the local governments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Depression , Transients and Migrants , Unemployment , Humans , Female , Male , India/epidemiology , Transients and Migrants/psychology , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data , Unemployment/psychology , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Young Adult , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Risk Factors , Prevalence , Mental Health , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Educational Status
13.
Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao ; 44(4): 795-800, 2024 Apr 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38708515

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of insomnia in college students and analyze the correlation between insomnia and perceived stress. METHODS: A cluster sampling method was used to investigate the prevalence of insomnia and stress levels in 3702 college students using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS-10). RESULTS: Insomnia was detected in 31.4% of the college students, and the symptoms were more severe in male students (t=2.047, P=0.041) and in those with poorer family economic conditions (F=20.423, P<0.001). Insomnia was positively correlated with perceived stress, perceived distress, and perceived coping ability, with correlation coefficients of 0.42, 0.38, and 0.31, respectively (P<0.001). The students with higher levels of perceived stress had higher insomnia scores (F=203.03, P<0.001) and higher detection rate of insomnia (χ2=359.784, P<0.001), and those with moderate or severe insomnia also had higher levels of perceived stress (F=293.569, P<0.001). The types of perceived stress among college students included incontrollable (15.3%), nervous (8.3%), vulnerable (23.0%) and the relaxed types (53.5%). The incontrollable type was associated with the highest insomnia scores, followed by the nervous type and susceptible type, and the relaxed type had the lowest insomnia scores (F= 185.969, P<0.001). The prevalence rates of insomnia in students with the 4 types of perceived stress were 57.3%, 43.3%, 39.3%, and 18.7%, respectively (χ2=368.876, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: There is a close correlation between perceived stress and insomnia, and identification of the high-risk population for insomnia from the perspectives of perceived stress level and perceived stress type can facilitate the management and prevention of insomnia.


Subject(s)
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress, Psychological , Students , Humans , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Students/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Male , Female , Universities , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult , Adaptation, Psychological , Perception
14.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(6): 329, 2024 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38709308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Psychological distress is a prevalent unpleasant experience faced by many cancer patients. However, the psychological distress among gastrointestinal (GI) cancer patients is scarcely explored. Moreover, the association between psychological distress and quality of life in different genders has yet to be explored. AIMS: To explore the psychological distress among GI cancer patients and examine its association with quality of life among different genders. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional study. A total of 237 gastrointestinal cancer patients completed the distress thermometer and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-General. RESULTS: The mean score of psychological distress of the participants was 3.04 (SD = 2.90). A greater proportion of female gastrointestinal cancer patients (52.8%) had clinically relevant psychological distress compared to males (35.9%). The quality of life was negatively associated with their psychological distress (B = - 1.502, 95%CI: - 2.759 to - 0.245, p = 0.019) among gastrointestinal cancer patients. Such association was stronger among males compared to females in gastrointestinal cancer patients (Interaction term, B = - 1.713, 95%CI: - 3.123 to - 0.303, p = 0.017). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that healthcare providers should attach their attention to gastrointestinal cancer patients' psychological distress, especially females. Longitudinal studies could adopted to track the changes in psychological distress and its association with quality of life over time among different genders. In future intervention studies, the focus of psychological interventions needs to be gender-specific.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms , Psychological Distress , Quality of Life , Humans , Male , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/psychology , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Aged , Adult , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1322742, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38694979

ABSTRACT

Background: Resident physicians at the standardized training stage had undergone significant physical and mental stress during the release of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions at the end of 2022 in China. This study aimed to investigate the psychological status (including anxiety, depression, somatic symptoms, job burnout, and vicarious trauma) of resident physicians and identify its influencing factors under these special periods. Methods: Survey was conducted one month after the release of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions on resident training physicians from a tertiary first-class hospital in Zhejiang, China. Resident physicians completed the psychological status questionnaire. Chi-square tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, and logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the group differences and variable associations. Results: The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and somatic discomfort in this study was 20.88, 28.53, and 41.47%, respectively. Female resident physicians were more likely to experience somatic symptoms [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33-4.18]. Resident physicians with problem-focused coping styles were less prone to psychological health issues [depression (adjusted OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96), anxiety (adjusted OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.98), somatic symptoms (adjusted OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.97), job burnout (adjusted OR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.87-0.96) and vicarious trauma (adjusted OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.98)]. Inversely, resident physicians with emotion-focused coping styles and experienced negative life events were more prone to psychological health issues. Conclusion: Resident training physicians had a high risk of anxiety, depression, and somatic symptoms under the special COVID-19 pandemic restriction release period. Females, with lower training stages, degrees, negative life events, and emotion-focused coping styles had a disadvantaged effect on psychological status. The medical teaching management department needs to monitor and reduce the workload and working hours of resident physicians, ensure sufficient sleep time, and pay attention to the psychological status of resident physicians. By strengthening regular communication and mental health education or intervention, which can help them improve their ability to cope with complex tasks.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Depression , Internship and Residency , Physicians , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , China/epidemiology , Male , Adult , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Anxiety/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adaptation, Psychological , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
16.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 24(1): 235, 2024 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an underdiagnosed cause of acute coronary syndrome, particularly in younger women. Due to limited information about SCAD, case reports and case series can provide valuable insights into its features and management. This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate the features of SCAD patients who experienced psychophysical stress before the SCAD event. METHODS: We conducted an electronic search of PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science from inception until January 7, 2023. We included case reports or series that described patients with SCAD who had experienced psychophysical stress before SCAD. Patients with pregnancy-associated SCAD were excluded from our analysis. RESULTS: In total, we included 93 case reports or series describing 105 patients with SCAD. The average patient age was 44.29 ± 13.05 years and a total of 44 (41.9%) of patients were male. Among the included SCAD patients the most prevalent comorbidities were fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and hypertension with the prevalence of 36.4 and 21.9%, respectively. Preceding physical stress was more frequently reported in men than in women; 38 out of 44 (86.4%) men reported physical stress, while 36 out of 61 (59.1%) females reported physical stress (p value = 0.009). On the other hand, the opposite was true for emotional stress (men: 6 (13.6%)), women: 29 (47.6%), p value < 0.001). Coronary angiography was the main diagnostic tool. The most frequently involved artery was the left anterior descending (LAD) (62.9%). In our study, recurrence of SCAD due to either the progression of a previous lesion or new SCAD in another coronary location occurred more frequently in those treated conservatively, however the observed difference was not statistically significant (p value = 0.138). CONCLUSION: While physical stress seems to precede SCAD in most cases, emotional stress is implicated in females more than males.


Subject(s)
Coronary Vessel Anomalies , Stress, Psychological , Vascular Diseases , Vascular Diseases/congenital , Humans , Female , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Coronary Vessel Anomalies/epidemiology , Coronary Vessel Anomalies/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Vessel Anomalies/complications , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Vascular Diseases/psychology , Vascular Diseases/physiopathology , Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Risk Factors , Prevalence , Risk Assessment , Sex Factors , Prognosis , Comorbidity , Aged
17.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 32: e4173, 2024.
Article in English, Spanish, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38695430

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between death distress, psychological adjustment, optimism, pessimism and perceived stress among nurses working during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: this study was designed as cross-sectional/cohort. The population of the study involved 408 nurses from Northern Cyprus, which are registered as full members of the Nurse Council. The sample comprised 214 nurses, who volunteered to participate in the study. The study data was collected using a web-based online survey (Demographic form, the Coronavirus Stress Measure, The Optimism and Pessimism Questionnaire, The Brief Adjustment Scale-6, The Death Distress Scale). RESULTS: the results indicated that perceived stress significantly and negatively predicted optimism (ß = -0.21, p < 0.001) and pessimism (ß = 0.38, p < 0.001). Perceived stress had significant and positive predictive effects on psychological adjustment (ß = 0.31, p < 0.001) and death distress (ß = 0.17, p < 0.01). Further analysis results revealed that pessimism mediates the association of stress with psychological adjustment and death distress; however, optimism only mediates the effect of stress on psychological adjustment among nurses. CONCLUSION: a low level of pessimism is effective in strengthening nurses' psychological adjustment skills againt perceived stress and death distress. Nurses should consider behavioral strategies to help reduce the level of pessimism during periods such as pandemics. BACKGROUND: (1) High levels of perceived stress increased higher score of psychological adjustment. (2) Pessimism mediates the association of stress with adjustment and death distress. (3) Optimism only mediates the effect of stress on psychological adjustment among nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Optimism , Pandemics , Pessimism , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Optimism/psychology , Female , Adult , Male , Pessimism/psychology , Middle Aged , Emotional Adjustment , Nurses/psychology , Cyprus , Attitude to Death , Adaptation, Psychological , Cohort Studies , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1357664, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38689730

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common chronic liver disease, affecting 25-30% of the general population globally. The condition is even more prevalent in individuals with obesity and is frequently linked to the metabolic syndrome. Given the known associations between the metabolic syndrome and common mental health issues, it is likely that such a relationship also exists between NAFLD and mental health problems. However, studies in this field remain limited. Accordingly, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to explore the prevalence of one or more common mental health conditions (i.e., depression, anxiety, and/or stress) in adults with NAFLD. Methods: PubMed, EBSCOhost, ProQuest, Ovid, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched in order to identify studies reporting the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and/or stress among adults with NAFLD. A random-effects model was utilized to calculate the pooled prevalence and confidence intervals for depression, anxiety and stress. Results: In total, 31 studies were eligible for inclusion, involving 2,126,593 adults with NAFLD. Meta-analyses yielded a pooled prevalence of 26.3% (95% CI: 19.2 to 34) for depression, 37.2% (95% CI: 21.6 to 54.3%) for anxiety, and 51.4% (95% CI: 5.5 to 95.8%) for stress among adults with NAFLD. Conclusion: The present findings suggest a high prevalence of mental health morbidity among adults with NAFLD. Given the related public health impact, this finding should prompt further research to investigate such associations and elucidate potential associations between NAFLD and mental health morbidity, exploring potential shared underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. Systematic review registration: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/, identifier CRD42021288934.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Depression , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease , Stress, Psychological , Humans , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/complications , Adult , Prevalence
19.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1396461, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38737860

ABSTRACT

Background: Burnout is a longstanding issue among educators and has been associated with psychological and physical health problems such as depression, and insomnia. Objective: To assess the prevalence and predictors of the three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of professional accomplishment) among elementary and high school teachers. Methods: This is a quantitative cross-sectional study with data collected via an online survey. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educator Survey (MBI-ES), the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) and the Perceived Stress Scale were used, respectively, to assess burnout, resilience and stress among teachers. Data was collected between September 1st, 2022 and August 30th, 2023. SPSS (version 28, IBM Corp) was used for the data analysis. Results: Overall, 1912 educators received a link to the online survey via a text message, and 780 completed the burnout survey questions, resulting in a response rate of 41%. The prevalence of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and lack of professional accomplishment were 76.9, 23.2, and 30.8%, respectively. Participants with high-stress symptoms were 6.88 times more likely to experience emotional exhaustion (OR = 6.88; 95% CI: 3.31-14.29), 2.55 times (OR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.65-3.93) more likely to experience depersonalization and 2.34 times (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.64-3.35) more likely to experience lack of professional fulfilment. Additionally, respondents with low resilience were 3.26 times more likely to experience emotional exhaustion symptoms (OR = 3.26; 95% CI: 2.00-5.31), than those with high resilience. Males were about 2.4 times more likely to present with depersonalization compared to female teachers, whilst those who indicated their marital status as partnered or cohabiting and those who selected "other" were 3.5 and 7.3 times, respectively, more likely to present with depersonalization compared with those who were single. Finally, Physical Education were 3.8 times more likely to present with depersonalization compared with English teachers. Conclusion: The current study highlights the predictive effects of low resilience and high stress on the three dimensions of burnout among teachers in Canada. Interventions aimed at addressing systemic stress and fostering resilience are needed to reduce burnout among teachers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , School Teachers , Humans , School Teachers/psychology , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Male , Female , Prevalence , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Canada/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
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