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1.
PeerJ ; 12: e17083, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38590705

ABSTRACT

Studies focusing on the safety and common side effects of vaccines play a crucial role in enhancing public acceptance of vaccination. Research is scarce regarding the usage of COVID-19 vaccines and the side effects experienced by health professions students in India and other countries. This study aimed to document self-reported side effects associated with COVID-19 vaccination among medical and dental students of six medical and dental colleges and teaching hospitals in four states (Tamil Nadu, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, and West Bengal) of India. A cross-sectional survey using purposive sampling of medical and dental students was conducted from 26 April to 26 May 2021. Data was collected using a Google Forms questionnaire capturing information regarding receiving COVID-19 vaccines, side effects and symptoms, onset and duration of symptoms, use of treatment to alleviate symptoms, awareness of haematologic risks associated with vaccination, and side effects from previous (non-COVID-19) vaccinations. The majority (94.5%) of participants received both doses of the Covishield/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. Among participants (n = 492), 45.3% (n = 223) reported one or more side effects. The most frequently reported side effects were soreness of the injected arm (80.3%), tiredness (78.5%), fever (71.3%), headache (64.1%), and hypersomnia (58.7%). The two most common severe symptoms were fever (14.8%) and headache (13%). Most side effects appeared on the day of vaccination: soreness of the injection site (57%), fever (43.1%), and tiredness (42.6%). Most reported symptoms persisted for one to three days-soreness of the injection site (53%), fever (47.1%), and headache (42.6%). Logistic regression showed that women were almost 85% less likely to report side effects. The study's findings corroborate the safety of the Covishield/AstraZeneca vaccine's first dose, evidenced by the relatively minor and transient nature of the side effects. However, the study underscores the necessity for ongoing research to assess the long-term impacts of COVID-19 vaccines, especially in the context of booster doses, thereby contributing to the global understanding of vaccine safety and efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Female , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Self Report , India/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache , Pain , Fatigue , Fever , Health Occupations
2.
AMA J Ethics ; 26(3): E232-236, 2024 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38446728

ABSTRACT

Inpatient psychiatric units are heavily regulated physical environments designed around the twin aims of treatment and containment. Less formally regulated but no less important are emotional norms and tones that also contribute significantly to psychiatric care environments. Inpatient psychiatric units are co-created by patients and clinicians, but clinicians have authority that patients do not. This means that clinicians' management of their own transference and reactions is clinically and ethically important. This article defines transference reactions and draws on case examples to canvass how positive and negative transference reactions can influence inpatient care of patients who are suicidal.


Subject(s)
Countertransference , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Inpatients , Emotions , Health Occupations
3.
BMJ Open ; 14(3): e077079, 2024 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38448071

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In rural areas, work-integrated learning in the form of health student placements has several potential benefits, including contributing to student learning, enhancing rural health service capacity and attracting future rural health workforce. Understanding what constitutes a high-quality rural placement experience is important for enhancing these outcomes. There is no current standardised definition of quality in the context of rural health placements, nor is there understanding of how this can be achieved across different rural contexts. This study is guided by one broad research question: what do university staff believe are the determinants of high-quality health professions student placements in regional, rural and remote Australia? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will adopt a convergent mixed-method design with two components. Component A will use explanatory sequential mixed methods. The first phase of component A will use a survey to explore determinants that contribute to the development of high-quality health student placements from the perspective of university staff who are not employed in University Departments of Rural Health and are involved in the delivery of health student education. The second phase will use semistructured interviews with the same stakeholder group (non-University Department of Rural Health university staff) to identify the determinants of high-quality health student placements. Component B will use a case study Employing COnceptUal schema for policy and Translation Engagement in Research mind mapping method to capture determinants that contribute to the development of high-quality health student placements from the perspective of University Department of Rural Health university staff. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The University of Melbourne Human Ethics Committee approved the study (2022-23201-33373-5). Following this, seven other Australian university human research ethics committees provided external approval to conduct the study. The results of the study will be presented in several peer-review publications and summary reports to key stakeholder groups.


Subject(s)
Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Universities , Australia , Research Design , Health Occupations
4.
BMJ Open ; 14(3): e078130, 2024 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38471690

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: It has been shown that mental health education can support positive attitudes of health profession students towards people with mental health challenges, which supports them to provide optimal healthcare to this group. There are many different approaches to designing and delivering mental health education to health profession students. Each has their own advantages and disadvantages, and often mental health education programmes incorporate a multimodal approach in order to reap the benefits of a variety of teaching and learning approaches. The aim of this study is to understand the current landscape of teaching and learning approaches to mental health education for undergraduate health profession students. We will examine the features of successful outcomes for health profession students for:Learning environment.Knowledge development and retention.Confidence. MOTIVATION: Preparedness for professional practice. METHODS: For this, a realist synthesis has been chosen in order to review the literature. Realist synthesis lends itself to the review of complex interventions such as mental health education for undergraduate health profession curricula because it seeks to uncover the range of different mechanisms and context configurations that produce different outcomes. Health profession education and education practice, in general, is complex. A patient and public involvement (PPI) group is involved throughout this study and includes undergraduate health profession students, and members of the St John of Gods Hospital Consumers and Carers Council who are involved at every stage of the research. This study will engage with a stakeholder group who will support the refining of the programme theory. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval has been sought and approved by Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland Ethical Committee (REC number: 212622783). We will aim to write up and publish the full synthesis as a journal article. We will also discuss ways of dissemination outside of academia with our PPI group.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Health Education , Curriculum , Learning , Review Literature as Topic
5.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2330257, 2024 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38493489

ABSTRACT

Enhancing health professional students' effective learning and collaborative practice requires a deep understanding of strategies for facilitating interprofessional learning. While faculty members and clinical preceptors are recognized as facilitators in interprofessional education (IPE), there is limited knowledge about the impact of student facilitators' engagement in IPE. Accordingly, this study aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of student facilitators in IPE. Thirteen student facilitators were recruited to lead an interprofessional learning program, and they were subsequently invited to participate in one-on-one interviews. An interview guide was developed to explore their motivations, expectations, engagement, effectiveness, and achievements in IPE facilitation. Thematic analysis was conducted using MAXQDA software to analyze the student facilitators' experiences and perceptions. Eight interviewees from various disciplines, including Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Speech and Hearing Sciences, and Social Work, took part in the study. The findings revealed that student facilitators highly valued their IPE facilitation experience, which aligned with their expectations and led to the creation of social networks, increased confidence, improved understanding of other professions, and the development of lifelong skills. Furthermore, the student facilitators demonstrated cognitive and social congruence by establishing a relaxed learning environment, displaying empathetic and supportive behaviors, and using inclusive language to engage IPE learners in group discussions. This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the role of student facilitators in IPE, contributing to the evolving literature on IPE. A conceptual framework was developed to explore the entire facilitation experience, encompassing the motivations and expectations of student facilitators, their engagement and effectiveness, and the observed achievements. These findings can inform the development of peer teaching training in IPE and stimulate further research in identifying relevant facilitator competencies for optimal delivery of IPE.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Relations , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Interprofessional Education , Qualitative Research , Learning , Students, Health Occupations/psychology
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 255, 2024 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38459445

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare services face significant challenges due to the aging population, increasing complexity of health issues, and a global shortage of health professionals. Health professions education needs to adapt and develop with healthcare services' needs. Interprofessional education and patient partnership are two trends that are increasingly being reinforced. Health professions students worldwide are expected to acquire competencies in interprofessional collaboration through undergraduate and postgraduate studies. Developing interprofessional collaborative skills in clinical placements is crucial. This study aims to explore two patients' meetings with an interprofessional student team and better understand how the patient can participate actively in the students´ learning processes. METHODS: This is a small single-case study. Two patients participated. Data was generated through participant observation and qualitative interviews. A practical iterative framework for qualitative data analysis inspired the analysis. RESULTS: The patients observed and reflected on the interprofessional students' learning process and felt responsible for contributing to their learning. The patients contributed to students' learning by making themselves available for practicing and sometimes giving feedback. They considered it a win-win situation to be involved in the interprofessional learning activity as they perceived being taken seriously by the students when addressing their problems and experienced positive outcomes for their situation, such as better physical functioning and adjustments to assistive devices. Patients emphasized the importance of learning collaboration between health professionals and how this could contribute to them feeling safer as patients. DISCUSSION: This study highlights the importance of including patients in interprofessional students' learning processes. Patients' active participation in interprofessional clinical placements can empower them, improve their self-efficacy, and potentially shift the power dynamic between patients and healthcare professionals. The study emphasizes the importance of the patient perspective in future research on interprofessional education in clinical settings. The study also highlights the need for clinical supervisors to facilitate patient involvement in interprofessional clinical placements and reinforce patients' feedback for the student team. CONCLUDING COMMENTS: Overall, this study contributes to the growing body of research on interprofessional education and patient partnership and emphasizes the importance of including patients in health professions education.


Subject(s)
Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Aged , Learning , Qualitative Research , Health Personnel , Interprofessional Relations , Health Occupations/education
7.
J Allied Health ; 53(1): 19-24, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38430492

ABSTRACT

Health professions students in their final year of the mental health counseling (MHC), nursing, occupational therapy (OT), pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and speech/language pathology programs at Touro University participated in a virtual interprofessional education (IPE) symposium designed to promote interprofessional collaboration. The students worked as an interprofessional team with a faculty facilitator to first create a plan of care and later a discharge plan for a fictitious patient. At the completion of the symposium, 281 out of 311 students completed the Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS), a tool that assesses competency in collaborative practice. Results demonstrated a significant increase in every collaboration-related competency for all participants as a group (p < 0.001), as well as significant differences between professions (F = 2.99, p = 0.007). For example, students from OT rated themselves lowest at the start and showed the greatest gains, and students from MHC showed the smallest gains but had the fewest participants. This virtual symposium resolved some common logistical challenges and was effective at improving interprofessional collaborative competency. Including a wide variety of health professions in this IPE activity facilitated a broad reach and applicability to the interprofessional teams that students will encounter in the future.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Relations , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Students, Health Occupations/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Health Occupations
8.
J Allied Health ; 53(1): e55-e59, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38430505

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created a shift in interprofessional education (IPE) courses, causing programs to change pedagogical approaches. We sought to examine student preferences for taking IPE simulations. On post-simulation surveys from two courses (n=844 students, 2020-2022 academic years), we asked students if they preferred to take the simulation through a synchronous in-person or virtual format. More students preferred a virtual platform in academic year 2021-2022 than the previous year (p<0.001). Students who chose the virtual format believed it was more convenient, reduced COVID-19 transmission, and eased interprofessional collaboration. The downsides to in-person simulations included travel logistics and technical challenges in the simulation lab. Students suggested that in-person simulations more closely resembled 'real life' and that communication and body language are easier to convey in person.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Relations , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Interprofessional Education , Pandemics
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 175, 2024 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38395883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the importance of interprofessional education in medical training has been well-established, no specific framework has been used uniformly or shown to be most effective in the creation of interprofessional education (IPE) sessions. Further, prior studies have demonstrated that students have preferences for the design of these experiences. In this study, we sought to understand medical student preference for interprofessional teammates and motivations for this choice. METHODS: In this single-institution, cross-sectional analysis of the Duke IPE Clinic, participating students from September 2019-March 2020 completed a voluntary electronic survey that queried preferences for which health professions students (Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT), Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN), Nurse Practitioner (NP), Pharmacy, and Physician's Associate (PA)) they would want to work with, and the motivating reason. Preferences and reasons were compared between first-year medical students (MS1s) and third- and fourth-year medical students (MS3s/MS4s). RESULTS: In total, 132 students participated. We found that MS1s most preferred interprofessional teammates with a more similar area of study (PA, NP), whereas MS3s/MS4s most preferred classmates with a less similar area of study (pharmacy, DPT, ABSN). MS1 students frequently selected their first-choice preference because the profession seemed most similar, while MS3/MS4 students often selected their first-choice preference because the profession seemed most different. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students earlier in training have more interest in working with professions they view as similar whereas senior students prefer to work with professions they view as more different. This information is important for designing educational IPE opportunities.


Subject(s)
Students, Health Occupations , Students, Medical , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Interprofessional Education , Curriculum , Interprofessional Relations
10.
J. Health Biol. Sci. (Online) ; 12(1): 1-7, jan.-dez. 2024. tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1530656

ABSTRACT

Introdução: O presente estudo teve como objetivo investigar e identificar a prevalência e fatores de risco associados ao tabagismo e outras formas de consumo de tabaco entre acadêmicos da saúde. Métodos: A pesquisa contou com 407 acadêmicos dos cursos de Biomedicina, Educação Física, Enfermagem, Farmácia, Fisioterapia e Nutrição de uma Instituição de Ensino Superior. A coleta de dados foi realizada no mês de maio de 2020, por um formulário eletrônico, disponibilizado em e-mail institucional, grupos de estudos e redes sociais. O procedimento ocorreu após aprovação pelo Comitê de Ética, cujo parecer 3.966.951. Resultados: A maioria dos participantes (79,6%) eram do sexo feminino, solteiros (75,2%) com idade média de 25,32 anos. O consumo de tabaco foi confirmado por 10,8% participantes. Quanto ao consumo de produtos derivados de tabaco 24,1% dos entrevistados já consumiram produto de tabaco, 8,6% assumiram tabagismo ocasional, e 4,2% tabagismo ativo. Conclusões: A associação entre tabagismo e as variáveis sociodemográficas demonstrou que alunos do curso de Farmácia (OR: 5,25 [IC:1,34-20,22] p=0,017), homens (OR: 1,71 [IC: 1,01 ­ 2,91]), estudantes turno matutino (OR: 1,96 [IC:1,02-3,78] p=0,04) e que residem com tabagistas (OR:4,44 [IC: 2,24-8,80]) apresentaram maiores chances de serem tabagista. A associação em relação ao consumo de derivados do tabaco, os homens apresentaram maiores prevalências de consumo de derivados de tabaco (OR: 1,71 [IC: 1,01 ­ 2,91] p=0,045) bem como, alunos do curso de Farmácia (OR: 6,40 [IC:2,31-17,7] P<0,01), que estudam no turno Noturno (OR:1,85 [IC:1,16-8,82] p=0,009) e entre os que residem com tabagistas (OR: 4,49 [IC:2,24-8,80] p<0,001).


Introduction: The present study aimed to investigate and identify the prevalence and risk factors associated with smoking and other forms of tobacco consumption among health academics. Methods: The survey involved 407 students from Biomedicine, Physical Education, Nursing, Pharmacy, Physiotherapy and Nutrition courses at a Higher Education Institution. Data collection was carried out in May 2020, through an electronic form, available in institutional email, study groups and social networks. The entire procedure took place after approval by the Ethics Committee. Results: Most participants (79.6%) were female, single (75.2%) with a mean age of 25.32 years. Tobacco consumption was confirmed by 10.8% of the participants. As for the consumption of tobacco products, 24.1% of the interviewees had already consumed some tobacco product, 8.6% assumed occasional smoking, and 4.2% active smoking. Conclusions: The association between smoking and sociodemographic variables showed that Pharmacy students (OR: 5.25 [CI:1.34-20.22] p=0.017), men (OR: 1.71 [CI: 1.01 ­ 2.91]), morning shift students (OR: 1.96 [CI:1.02-3.78] p=0.04) and those who live with smokers (OR:4.44 [CI : 2.24-8.80]) were more likely to be smokers. The association in relation to the consumption of tobacco derivatives, men had a higher prevalence of consumption of tobacco derivatives (OR: 1.71 [CI: 1.01 ­ 2.91] p=0.045) as well as Pharmacy students (OR: 6.40 [CI:2.31-17.7] P<0.01), those who study the night shift (OR:1.85 [CI:1.16-8.82] p=0.009 ) and among those who live with smokers (OR: 4.49 [CI:2.24-8.80] p<0.001).


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Tobacco Use Disorder , Students, Health Occupations
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 204, 2024 Feb 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38413938

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since 2011, five educational and healthcare institutions have implemented a short interprofessional education (IPE) course to bring together undergraduates from five disciplines. To meet the logistical challenges of IPE implementation, more specifically, the large number of classrooms needed to gather students together and the need for human resources to guide learning activities, a face-to-face IPE course was redesigned into a blended (online and face-to-face collaborative learning activities) IPE course. In March 2023, 183 medical, 378 nursing, 46 radiologic technology, 69 physiotherapy, and 74 occupational therapy students participated in a one-day IPE blended course to learn interprofessional team functioning and dynamics, role clarification and responsibilities of other professions, and interprofessional communication skills. This study aimed to assess students' changes in attitudes towards IPE after being involved in a large-scale interprofessional blended learning course. METHODS: A before-after study was conducted using a French translation of the validated questionnaire "University of West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire" (UWE-IP questionnaire). Students' attitudes towards interprofessional (IP) relationships and IP learning were measured before and after the course. In March 2023, two hundred fifty-six students from five professions answered two subscales of the UWE-IP questionnaire before and after the course (response rate 34%). RESULTS: Students' attitudes towards IP relationships improved significantly after the course. The score on this subscale (min 8; max 24) changed from 11.18 (SD 2,67) before the course to 10,38 (SD 2,55) after the course, indicating a significant improvement in attitudes towards IP relationships (p < 0,001). More specifically, students had more positive attitudes on the item "I have a good understanding of the roles of different health and social care professionals." and the item "I feel that I am respected by people from other health and social care disciplines." after the course. A positive change in students' attitudes towards IP learning was observed, but the results were not significative. CONCLUSION: A face-to-face IPE course redesigned as a blended course helped overcome existing challenges to implementing an IPE course. The results suggest a blended IPE course improves students' attitudes towards interprofessionality.


Subject(s)
Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Interprofessional Education , Attitude of Health Personnel , Learning
12.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0296759, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38354173

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The literature puts forward a range of challenges of interprofessional education (IPE) related to its planning, initiation, implementation, and especially to IPE assessment. The present study aims to map changes in students' readiness and interprofessional collaboration competence (IPCC) in implementing an innovative IPE module. Potential differences in impact related to the health education programs and IPCC scores resulting from self-, peer-, and tutor assessments will also be analysed. METHODS: A pre-post design was adopted. The student's readiness for interprofessional learning was assessed using the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale, and the student's IPCC score was calculated based on self-, peer-, and tutor assessments with the interprofessional collaborator assessment rubric. RESULTS: Students' mean post-test readiness scores and mean post-test IPCC scores were significantly higher than the total and subscales/domain pre-test scores (p<0.01). No significant within-subject differences were observed in students' readiness total or subscale scores when comparing health educational programs. However, significant differences were observed in students' mean total IPCC scores between programs (p<0.01). Significant differences in students' average IPCC scores were found when comparing self-, peer- and tutor assessment scores in six domains (p<0.01). Also, significant correlations between peer and tutor assessment scores were observed (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: The IPE module, designed and implemented to focus on patient-centred practice within a primary care context, positively impacted students' readiness and IPCC development. These results offer insights to expand the implementation of the IPE module to all health educational programs.


Subject(s)
Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Interprofessional Education , Vietnam , Learning , Interprofessional Relations , Attitude of Health Personnel
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 43, 2024 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38191382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Imposter Phenomenon (IP) is a subjective feeling of intellectual fraudulence and self-doubt experienced by individuals in goal-orientated high-achieving professions. The impact of IP within healthcare has been associated with individual physical and mental health and concerns around training, career progression and DEI at an institutional level. To effectively address IP in healthcare, this scoping review aims to explore educational interventions designed to empower high-achieving individuals with the tools needed to confront and overcome IP. METHODS: The scoping review adhered to a predetermined protocol informed by the JBI methodology and PRISMA-ScR guidelines in order to identify educational interventions addressing IP in high-achieving industries. Articles were searched across multiple databases, including MEDLINE (Ovid), PsychINFO, SCOPUS, and Web of Science, alongside grey literature, without imposing any time constraints. A systematic approach including a thematic analysis allowed for a nuanced exploration and interpretation of the identified educational interventions and their impact on addressing IP. RESULTS: Seventeen articles were incorporated into the review, with the majority originating from the USA and majority being published since 2020. Ten studies targeted healthcare professionals, undergraduate and postgraduate healthcare students. Majority of studies aimed at addressing IP, featured a larger number of female participants than males. Workshops with self-reflection and group-guided exercises to overcome IP were the most popular educational interventions. Coaching and structured supervision were also suggested. Across all papers, three themes emerged for coping strategies: individual, peer-to-peer, and institutional. CONCLUSIONS: This scoping review suggests how group and individual interventions such as workshops, small group discussions and coaching can be used to overcome IP in healthcare. Institutional changes like diversity promotion, supervisor education, and support networks are crucial in addressing IP. Further long term and speciality specific assessments are needed to measure impact. Overall, the review highlights how educational awareness and a variety of strategies can be implemented to create a supportive environment for professionals dealing with IP, promoting their well-being and success.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders , Health Personnel , Self Concept , Female , Humans , Male , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Emotions , Students, Health Occupations , Psychotherapy, Group , Health Personnel/psychology
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 25, 2024 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38178042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Universities have widely switched from traditional face-to-face classes to online instruction as a result of the epidemic. Self-directed learning is becoming the new norm for university students' learning styles. The ability of health professions students to learn independently during online study directly impacts the effectiveness of online medical education. The ability to learn on their own initiative may be affected by health professions students' professional identities, defined as their positive perceptions, evaluations, emotional experiences, and identity as professionals related to medicine. This study aimed to look into the current status and the factors that influence health professions students' self-directed learning ability (SDLA) during online study and its relationship with professional identity. METHODS: This study was conducted from September to November 2022 at a medical school in East China. An online questionnaire was used to collect participants' status of online learning, self-directed learning ability (SDLA), and professional identity. RESULTS: One thousand two hundred ninety-eight health professions students demonstrated intermediate self-directed learning ability during online study. In terms of teacher-student interaction (F = 14.778, P < 0.001), student-student interaction (F = 15.713, P < 0.001), and learning concentration (F = 13.424, P < 0.001), there were significant differences in health professions students' self-directed learning ability. Professional identity and self-directed learning ability positively correlated (r = 0.589-0.802, P < 0.01). Academic atmosphere and professional identity were significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS: The self-directed learning ability of health professions students while receiving instruction online is at an intermediate level and is influenced by several factors. Developing health professions students' professional identities can enhance their ability for self-directed learning.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Health Occupations , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Learning , Health Occupations
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 62, 2024 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38225611

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Modern medicine emphasizes that medical professionals engage in interprofessional collaboration to better meet the diverse needs of patients from physical, psychological, and social perspectives. As nursing students are the future reserve of the clinical nursing workforce, nursing educators worldwide should pay close attention to nursing students' interprofessional learning attitudes and take responsibility for training qualified interprofessional nursing personnel. However, little is known about the relationship between nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning and academic self-efficacy. Thus, this study aims to investigate the level of readiness for interprofessional learning and academic self-efficacy among nursing students, and to explore the relationship between the two. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a sample of 741 undergraduate nursing students pursuing four-year degrees from a school in Jinan, Shandong Province, China from November to December 2021. The social-demographic questionnaire, Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale, and Academic Self-efficacy Scale were used for data collection. Descriptive statistics used to analyze the data included: Cronbach's alpha, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: Readiness for interprofessional learning mean score was (3.91 ± 0.44) and mean academic self-efficacy was (3.47 ± 0.42). Significant differences were found in the research variables according to participants' sex, grade, choice of nursing profession, and frequency of communication with health-related major students in studies (p < 0.05, p < 0.001). Pearson correlation analysis showed that academic self-efficacy was positively related to readiness for interprofessional learning (r = 0.316, p < 0.01). The hierarchical regression analysis showed that academic self-efficacy was positively related to readiness for interprofessional learning (ß = 0.307, p < 0.001), The model explained 15.6% of the variance in readiness for interprofessional learning (F = 18.038, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Readiness for interprofessional learning and academic self-efficacy were in the middle level among nursing students. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between the two. Therefore, it is very important for nursing educators to improve nursing students' academic self-efficacy before improving their readiness for interprofessional learning.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Health Occupations , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Students, Health Occupations/psychology , Self Efficacy , Attitude of Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires , Interprofessional Relations
16.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 16(3): 196-201, 2024 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38171978

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Meaningful interprofessional education (IPE) involves students from at least two professions interacting to learn with, about, and from one another. Our objective was to describe a novel online approach used to create meaningful IPE within a social determinants of health (SDoH) workshop. INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY: This online workshop integrated four different professions' perspectives on SDoH (social-work, public-health, nursing, and pharmacy). Each six-student interprofessional team was assigned a local neighborhood. This week-long workshop had numerous activities (pre- and post-workshop quizzes, a SDoH-primer video, video self-introduction to teammates, a windshield questionnaire with two subsequent clinical cases, a post-workshop reflection, and post-workshop evaluation). For discussion, asynchronous video-based responses were used instead of traditional text-based discussion-boards. DISCUSSION: Quantitatively comparing quiz scores, students' SDoH knowledge increased with this workshop. Qualitatively from evaluations, most students found this workshop helpful and meaningful. Supporting use of video-based responses, many students' favorite aspect was interacting and collaborating within their interprofessional teams, although some students desired synchronous activities instead. Faculty facilitators confirmed that meaningful IPE interactions occurred. IMPLICATIONS: In short, students from multiple health-professions learned SDoH-content and, using video-based responses, interacted asynchronously during this online workshop. This report demonstrated one tool available to help facilitate meaningful IPE asynchronously. This asynchronous, online IPE workshop appears to be a promising format to be integrated with other in-person IPE sessions.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Interprofessional Education , Social Determinants of Health , Interprofessional Relations , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
J Interprof Care ; 38(2): 245-252, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37946119

ABSTRACT

Social workers on interprofessional teams help highlight the mental health aspects of wellness and alert teams to potential social barriers to care. Social work students have been valued in new interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives across the United States; however, researchers have shown that social work practitioners often feel outside of and not valued by interprofessional teams. Social work student reflections were analyzed as research data to explore experiences on student IPE teams. This was an inductive, qualitative study informed by literary analysis methods, reading for power dynamics and implicit bias. This analysis uncovered social work students holding on to stereotypes of other professions as well as detrimental stereotypes of their own profession. Displays of respect for social work and early opportunities for successful advocacy allowed social work students to feel confident in their role and encouraged participation. This study considers how social work participation can be encouraged on interprofessional student teams.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Relations , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Students, Health Occupations/psychology , Qualitative Research , Social Workers , Social Work
18.
Med Teach ; 46(3): 330-336, 2024 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37917988

ABSTRACT

Despite the numerous calls for integrating quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) curricula into health professions education, there are limited examples of effective implementation for early learners. Typically, pre-clinical QIPS experiences involve lectures or lessons that are disconnected from the practice of medicine. Consequently, students often prioritize other content they consider more important. As a result, they may enter clinical settings without essential QIPS skills and struggle to incorporate these concepts into their early professional identity formation. In this paper, we present twelve tips aimed at assisting educators in developing QIPS education early in the curricula of health professions students. These tips address various key issues, including aligning incentives, providing longitudinal experiences, incorporating real-world care outcomes, optimizing learning environments, communicating successes, and continually enhancing education and care delivery processes.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Students, Health Occupations , Humans , Quality Improvement , Curriculum , Learning
19.
J Interprof Care ; 38(1): 87-94, 2024 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37422881

ABSTRACT

This exploratory study looked at the experiences of social work, occupational therapy, and nursing students who participated in an interprofessional simulation that was offered virtually due to the impact of COVID-19. The simulation was a one-day event that introduced advanced care planning to the students through an IPE team approach and incorporated various learning and teaching modalities. Using conventional content analysis of the post-program survey data from 255 students (35 occupational therapy; 87 social work; and 133 nursing), three primary themes were identified for the value of learning virtual interprofessional collaboration during a pandemic: (1) catalyst for telehealth education; (2) patient, family & professional safety; and (3) connection and continuity of care. In addition, students identified four primary themes that were learned and perceptions of what could lie ahead beyond the simulation: (1) patient & family convenience and inclusion; (2) expand interprofessional team involvement; (3) alleviate disparities/increase access; and (4) the "new normal" of virtual IP Collaboration.


Subject(s)
Students, Health Occupations , Students, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , Interprofessional Relations , Learning , Health Occupations
20.
Anat Sci Educ ; 17(1): 128-138, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37622991

ABSTRACT

Interprofessional anatomy dissection (IAD) courses increase students' readiness for interprofessional education (IPE) both in-person and online. During the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual environments for anatomy learning were perceived as less effective. Hybrid instruction approaches emerged but have been scarcely evaluated. This study assessed students' experiences with a hybrid IAD course's virtual and in-person components. A hybrid IAD course consisting of virtual and in-person anatomy laboratory-based instruction was offered to 32 students from different health sciences programs. Before and after the full course, students completed the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS). After the virtual and the in-person course components, students completed a Q-methodology survey to assess their perceptions of the course. Twenty-eight students (20 females; 24.8 ± 6.3 years old) from different programs (4 Physician Assistant; 2 Midwifery; 3 Speech-Language Pathology; 4 Physiotherapy; 3 Occupational therapy; 4 Nursing; 8 Medicine) participated. The total RIPLS score improved after the 8-week course (Median 84 interquartile range [78-87] vs. 87 [85-90]; p = 0.0145). The Q-methodology identified three factors: IPE & Virtual Enthusiasts, Introspective Learners, and IPE & Virtual Skeptics. Factors represented different levels of students' engagement with the IPE and virtual environment. The transition to in-person resulted in all factors praising the experience. Health science students showed improvements in their readiness for IPE after an 8-week hybrid IAD course. The main differences in the evaluations of the virtual and in-person components were related to engagement and the ability to learn anatomy; no differences were noted between settings regarding engagement in IPE.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , Students, Health Occupations , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Pandemics , Anatomy/education , Dissection/education , Learning , Interprofessional Relations , Attitude of Health Personnel
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