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1.
PM R ; 14(1): 58-67, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33611858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: FRAME, a mnemonic referring to a program for helping health care providers adapt patient-provider communication when working with patients with communication disorders, improves the knowledge, confidence, and communication skills of medical students for working with this population. However, the impact of the FRAME program for preparing students from the rehabilitation disciplines to work with patients with communication disorders is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the FRAME program on the knowledge, confidence, and communication skills of students in physical therapy (PT), occupational therapy (OT), and prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) in terms of how to communicate effectively with patients with communication disorders. DESIGN: An exploratory, quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design. SETTING: PT, OT, and P&O clinical education programs at the University of Washington's Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty rehabilitation students (PT = 12; OT = 7; and P&O = 1) participated in the FRAME training. INTERVENTIONS: The FRAME program, delivered in a single, 2-hour session teaches students communication skills to use with patients with various types of communication disorders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A quiz of students' knowledge about communication disorders and a self-rating of confidence for interacting with this patient population were used. Speech-language pathology graduate clinicians rated students' use of communication strategies from each area of the FRAME training during interactions with standardized patients portraying aphasia and dysarthria. Student qualitative feedback were also collected. RESULTS: Students' knowledge, confidence, and use of communication strategies improved significantly following training. Greatest gains were observed in students' ability to familiarize themselves with how a patient communicates and establish a method of communication before proceeding with the interview. Qualitative feedback aligned with these findings. CONCLUSIONS: The FRAME program increases the knowledge, confidence, and use of communication strategies in rehabilitation students in order to communicate more effectively with patients with communication disorders in their future careers.


Subject(s)
Communication Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Communication , Humans , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Students
2.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221114831, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35920022

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this report, we outline our approach to implementing a hybrid in-person and virtual clinic model at a student-run free clinic (SRFC) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals of low socioeconomic status (SES) are at an increased risk for COVID-19 infection and severe clinical outcomes. It is unclear if telehealth is a viable continuity of care enabler for the underserved. METHODS: The Weill Cornell Community Clinic (WCCC) implemented a novel telehealth clinic model to serve uninsured patients in May 2020. A phone survey of was conducted to assess WCCC patients access to technology needed for telehealth visits (eg, personal computers, smartphones). Patient no-show rates were retrospectively assessed for both in-person (pre-pandemic) and hybrid continuity of care models. RESULTS: The phone survey found that 90% of WCCC patients had access to technology needed for telehealth visits. In the 8 months following implementation of the hybrid model, telehealth and in-person no-show rates were 11% (14/128) and 15% (10/67) respectively; the combined hybrid no-show rate was 12% (24/195). For comparison, the in-person 2019 no-show rate was 23% (84/367). This study aligns with previous reports that telehealth improves patient attendance. CONCLUSION: Literature on the transition of SRFCs from in-person to telehealth care delivery models is limited. At the WCCC, the reduction in no-show rates supports the feasibility and benefits of adopting telehealth for the delivery of care to underserved patient populations. We believe the hybrid telehealth model described here is a viable model for other student run free clinics to increase access to care in low SES communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Student Run Clinic , Students, Medical , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , Retrospective Studies
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 608, 2022 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35933354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Basic medical laboratory courses (BMLCs) play an essential role in medical education and offer several benefits to students. Although various student-centered and active learning strategies have been increasingly incorporated into medical education, their applications in BMLCs are limited. This paper aimed to explore the educational effects of a flipped classroom (FC) combined with team-based learning (TBL) strategy in BMLCs at Zhejiang University School of Medicine. METHODS: Four hundred eight 3rd-Year medical students were assigned to either the FC-TBL group (n = 235) or the FC group (n = 173) to complete three experiments on the respiration block of BMLCs. The two groups' immediate and long-term academic performance were compared, and the FC-TBL students' perceptions of different instructional strategies were surveyed. RESULTS: Students in the FC-TBL group scored higher on the immediate post-tests after class and higher on the final exams in two of the three experiment sessions. They preferred FC-TBL to FC for its higher engagement, more feedback, and better learning environment. Students felt the FC with TBL blended instructional strategy stimulated their interest in learning and deep thinking. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the FC group, students in the FC-TBL group improved academic performance and had a more positive experience overall. Our findings support the feasibility and advantage of the flipped classroom with team-based learning as a blended learning strategy in the BMLC curriculum.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Humans , Problem-Based Learning
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 938132, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35937240

ABSTRACT

Background: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, online learning and long-term isolation from social and clinical settings has exacerbated mental health problems and symptoms of academic burnout among medical students. However, few studies have discussed symptoms of academic burnout as a result of reduced social support, and increased stress among medical students during the process of online learning. To fill this gap, this study investigated the influencing factors and mechanism of academic burnout in medical students' online learning process. Both the positive inhibition effect of positive factors such as social support, and the negative aggravation effect of negative factors such as stress were explored, while the mediating and protecting role of resilience is also discussed. Method: We collected survey data from a total of 817 medical students from a medical school in China who participated in online learning during the fall 2021 semester. An online questionnaire was sent to the students in January, 2022. Items adapted from the DASS Scale developed by Lovibond and Lovibond were used to measure medical students' stress levels. The perceived social support of medical students was assessed by the Gregory MSPSS. Resilience was evaluated by the 10-Item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS) were used to calculate students' academic burnout. Descriptive analysis, correlation analysis, hierarchical linear regression analysis and structural equation modeling were used to analyze the collected data. Results: The results identified that in the context of online learning there was a positive correlation between medical students' stress and academic burnout, and their resilience played a partial mediating role. However, social support did not directly affect academic burnout, but inhibited the prevalence of academic burnout through resilience. In addition, stress was negatively related to resilience, while social support was positively related to resilience. Resilience was found to be negatively related to medical students' academic burnout in online learning. Conclusion: The results of this study can provide a reference for the future development of appropriate educational strategies and coping measures to ameliorate the academic burnout of medical students.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Social Support , Students, Medical/psychology
6.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 8999025, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35937387

ABSTRACT

This mixed method study explores medical students' perceptions and attitudes regarding the language(s) of medical instruction in two Palestinian universities. The researcher aimed to identify the way medical students look at the language of medical education as well as the merits and drawbacks of the language(s) used in medical instruction. A 25-item descriptive, online questionnaire was built to explore the way university students evaluate and perceive the medium of medical instruction at the Faculty of Medicine. To complement and inform the quantitative findings, fifty-five students from each university were randomly selected, and their responses to an open question about the merits and drawbacks of the language(s) were analyzed using MAXQDA. Of the too many medical students enrolled in the two universities, 604 completed and returned the survey, and 55 students were selected to interpret their open responses qualitatively. The study findings suggest that the students are divided into two camps concerning what the language of medical instruction should be; some prefer Arabic, their mother tongue, while the others showed no reservations about using the medical academic vocabulary in English. Some statistically significant differences were found when some demographic variables, i.e., gender, specific major, and year of study, interact. Finally, study respondents highlighted several issues which the researcher sorted into advantages and disadvantages for each language. There is a considerable discrepancy in the choice of the language of medical instruction at the Faculty of Medicine. Each language has its pros and cons; consequently, a mixture of a mother and a foreign language (e.g., English) could be a suitable compromise in a country like Palestine.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Arabs , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Language , Universities
7.
Int J Med Educ ; 13: 187-197, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35909350

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To explore factors associated with prescribing confidence and competence of final-year medical students for prescribing antiplatelet and fibrinolytic agents in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods: The study was conducted among final-year medical students with a triangular convergent mixed-methods approach. First, an online survey was conducted using a voluntary sampling method with concurrent in-depth interviews performed. The survey data was analysed using descriptive statistics and paired t-tests, while survey factors were compared using the chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. The interview data were coded and analysed thematically. The relations between the qualitative and quantitative findings were finally described. Results: Totally 92 validly replied to the questionnaire, and 20 participated in the interviews. The quantitative analysis indicated that they had high competence in the diagnosis of STEMI and prescribing antiplatelet and fibrinolytic agents. The mean confidence score of prescribing for both was medium and was significantly lower in fibrinolytic agents. (M=3.3, SD=1.1 vs. M=2.8, SD=1.0, t(91)=5.39, p<0.01). Their experience, knowledge, and mentoring were accounted for, considering the prescribing confidence factors in both approaches. Besides, providing guidelines and standing orders were derived from the interview data. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated that final-year medical students have a high ability to diagnose and prescribe essential medications in STEMI but tend to have low confidence in prescribing fibrinolytic agents. Experiential learning, mentorship and providing guidelines can help them, especially in emergency settings to prescribe confidently and safely. Further multicenter studies on undergraduate and graduate medical students' confidence and perspective of prescribing are required, especially for high-alert medications.


Subject(s)
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Students, Medical , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Mentors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 935405, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35910871

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with computer vision syndrome in medical students at a private university in Paraguay. Methods: A survey study was conducted in 2021 in a sample of 228 medical students from the Universidad del Pacífico, Paraguay. The dependent variable was CVS, measured with the Computer Visual Syndrome Questionnaire (CVS-Q). Its association with covariates (hours of daily use of notebook, smartphone, tablet and PC, taking breaks when using equipment, use of preventive visual measures, use of glasses, etc.) was examined. Results: The mean age was 22.3 years and 71.5% were women. CVS was present in 82.5% of participants. Higher prevalence of CVS was associated with wearing a framed lens (PR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.03-1.20). In contrast, taking a break when using electronic equipment at least every 20 min and every 1 h reduced 7% (PR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87-0.99) and 6% (PR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-0.99) the prevalence of CVS, respectively. Conclusion: Eight out of 10 students experienced CVS during the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of framed lenses increased the presence of CVS, while taking breaks when using electronic equipment at least every 20 min and every 1 h reduced CVS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Students, Medical , Adult , Computers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ergonomics , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Paraguay/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Syndrome , Universities , Young Adult
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 590, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35915439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical graduates should have acquired basic competences that enable them to practice medicine independently as physicians and to enter postgraduate training in any specialty they wish. Little is known about advanced undergraduate medical students' perceptions of basic medical competences needed to start postgraduate training and about specialty-specific competences. This qualitative study aims to identify medical students' perceptions of basic medical competences and specific competence requirements for different specialties. METHODS: In December 2020, sixty-four advanced undergraduate medical students participated in the role of a resident in a competence-based telemedicine training simulating a first day in postgraduate training. After the training, eight focus group interviews were conducted about students' perceptions of basic medical competences and specialty-specific competences using a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically according to the six steps of Braun and Clarke. The analysis was carried out by an inductive search for themes, which were deductively assigned to the six competence areas of the requirement-tracking questionnaire (R-Track). RESULTS: Regarding basic medical competences, four R-Track competence areas could be identified as main themes. The students considered 'Social-interactive competences' to be particularly relevant for basic clinical work, including 'Structuring information', 'Tactfulness', and 'Stress resistance'. Students especially emphasized 'Concentration' as an important aspect of the competence area 'Mental abilities'. Among 'Personality traits', 'Honesty' was mentioned most frequently, and students were also aware that 'Expertise' is particularly important for 'Motivation'. For different specialties, some competence areas were newly added to the competences needed for the respective specialty. For surgery, the competence areas 'Sensory abilities' and 'Psychomotor & multitasking abilities' were mentioned anew. 'Sensory abilities' were also newly attributed to radiology. 'Mental abilities' were mentioned as new competence area for psychiatry and internal medicine, while for anaesthesiology, 'Psychomotor & multitasking abilities' were newly added. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced students seem to be well aware of basic competences needed for clinical practice. Good consensus between students and physicians was only found for psychiatry-specific competences. Medical schools should support their students in matching their perceptions of competences needed for specific specialties with specialty-specific requirements for a realistic choice of a specialty for postgraduate training.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Physicians , Students, Medical , Humans , Internal Medicine , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Ghana Med J ; 56(1): 15-22, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35919781

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study assessed the coping strategies of Nigerian medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design: We conducted an online descriptive cross-sectional study among medical and dental students attending three of the largest Colleges of Medicine in the Southwestern zone of Nigeria. Settings: Our study involved students across the pre-clinical and clinical levels of the three Colleges of Medicine. Participants: We selected the respondents through a purposive sampling technique and disseminated questionnaires applied using an online survey platform (Google forms https://forms.gle/19yfEzehJKwsme759). A total of 1010 participants out of 2404 eligible students completed the questionnaires accurately, giving a response rate of 42%. Methods: The Brief-COPE questionnaire assessed the participants' coping strategies (approach and avoidant) during the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted a bivariate analysis using the chi-square test and multiple regression analysis (p< 0.05) to determine the predictors of avoidant coping strategies. Results: Respondents mean age was 21.8±2.9 years, results were presented as Odds Ratios(OR) at 95% confidence intervals(CI). About 95% of respondents employed an approach coping strategy, while the minority(5%) adopted an avoidant coping strategy. Females were three times more likely to employ an avoidant coping strategy (OR=3.32 (95% CI 1.67-6.21) compared to male students. Conclusion: This study reveals that the majority of the respondents employed an approach coping strategy towards the COVID-19 pandemic. Females were more likely to employ an avoidant coping strategy. We recommend gender-specific programs to help medical students cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding: No External Funding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Young Adult
14.
F1000Res ; 11: 341, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35919099

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to identify the preferred sources for acquiring knowledge about COVID-19 and to evaluate basic knowledge on critical scientific literature appraisal in students from medical schools located in Spanish speaking countries in Latin America.  Methods: We designed an online survey of 15 closed-ended questions related to demographics, preferred resources for COVID-19 training, and items to assess critical appraisal skills. A snowball method was used for sampling. We conducted a descriptive analysis and Chi-squared tests to compare the proportion of correct identification of the concept of a preprint and a predatory journal when considering a) self-perceived level of knowledge, b) public vs private school, c) inclusion of a scientific literature appraisal subject in the curriculum, and d) progress in medical school. Results: Our sample included 770 valid responses, out of which most of the participants included were from Mexico (n=283, 36.8%) and Ecuador (n=229, 29.7%). Participants preferred using evidence-based clinical resources (EBCRs) to learn more about COVID-19 (n=182, 23.6%). The preferred study design was case report/series (n=218, 28.1%). We found that only 265 participants correctly identified the concept of a preprint (34.4%), while 243 students (31.6%) correctly identified the characteristics of a predatory journal. We found no significant differences in the proportion of correct answers regardless of the self-perceived level of knowledge, progress in medical school, or scientific literature critical appraisal classes. Conclusion: This study is novel in its approach of identifying sources of knowledge used by Latin American medical students and provides insights into the need to reinforce training in critical appraisal of scientific literature during medical school.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Latin America , Literacy , Pandemics
15.
Front Public Health ; 10: 911117, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35910908

ABSTRACT

Background: With the development of the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of online teaching is becoming more and more prominent, especially for the basic advanced mathematics majoring in bio-pharmaceutical in colleges. However, the only online teaching model loses efficiency when facing the undergraduates in application-oriented universities. Purpose: How to improve the teaching quality of advanced mathematics has always been a concern because the mathematical abilities of students in application-oriented universities are not ideal. In this article, we develop a blending online-offline teaching model that combined online teaching and offline outcome-based education (OBE), as an alternative to traditional offline education. Methodology: The comparative analysis experiment is carried out to the two classes of undergraduates. The control group and the experimental group are, respectively, the 2020 class students and the 2021 class students majoring in bio-pharmaceutical. The experimental group students receive the combined teaching method, while the control group students receive the traditional offline education. Results: (1) From the comparative analysis, we can find that the students under the online-offline teaching model are more differentiated than those under the traditional offline education model. (2) The online-offline teaching model equipped with "case study + knowledge point + applications" process has achieved a good teaching effect in the author's university. Conclusion: The proposed teaching model can well stimulate students' interest in advanced mathematics learning and resonate with students through actual cases, thereby arousing students' autonomous learning drive and allowing them to apply what they have learned to professional fields.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Humans , Mathematics , Pandemics , Universities
17.
Acad Med ; 97(8): 1160-1163, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35917543

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Students eager to enter the medical field must develop perspective-taking skills that enhance their ability to connect with patients. Toward this goal, the authors developed a pilot workshop for undergraduate students that included an art activity during which they collaborated to design scalp tattoos to symbolize cancer patients' experiences with chemotherapy and hair loss. APPROACH: A 90-minute, arts-based workshop was held in April 2019. One author selected anonymous excerpts from previously conducted interviews with patients experiencing ovarian and uterine cancer. These excerpts were shared with students to humanize patients' perspectives and give context to the difficulty of coping with chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Students discussed these excerpts and images of scalp tattoos from the internet. Together, they then designed scalp tattoos representing their perspective on the experience of coping with chemotherapy and hair loss and drew them onto mannequin heads. OUTCOMES: Twenty members of the university community participated in this workshop, including 3 faculty members and 17 undergraduate students. Participants worked together to create 2 sets of scalp tattoos. Of the 20 participants, 75% (n = 15) responded to the postworkshop survey. All respondents were undergraduate students, and 73% (n = 11) reported an increase in empathy toward patients and 87% (n = 13) an increased connection with the patient experience. All respondents agreed that the art activity demonstrated the importance of taking the patient's perspective. NEXT STEPS: This arts-based workshop is effective and can be replicated for other audiences, including undergraduate students, medical students, and practicing clinicians, to encourage perspective-taking and compassion for patients. Further analysis of students' skill development using pre- and postworkshop data is needed.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Students, Medical , Tattooing , Alopecia/chemically induced , Humans , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Scalp , Tattooing/adverse effects
18.
Acad Med ; 97(8): 1170-1174, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35917544

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Medical students experience high levels of burnout and face barriers to accessing support services. However, few studies have considered the feasibility and/or effectiveness of one-on-one peer support programs for medical students. This report aims to describe the development and implementation of such a program, the Side-by-Side Peer Support Program, at the University of Ottawa (August 2018-June 2020). APPROACH: Thirty-five medical students enrolled at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine were selected to participate in a training course aimed at developing the skills necessary to provide one-on-one support to their peers. The main responsibilities of peer supporters were to reach out to classmates, particularly those displaying changes in their usual behavior that might be indicative of mental illness, to provide basic counseling, and to refer at-risk students to professional services. Peer supporters offered weekly hours during which classmates could contact them for support. Information on interactions between students and peer supporters was recorded in an electronic database. An end-of-year survey collected information on barriers to seeking help perceived by medical students. OUTCOMES: A total of 303 interactions were recorded. Interactions took place in various formats, including in-person, via telephone or video call, or via texting or online messaging. Interactions were initiated by both students and peer supporters. Survey respondents identified more barriers to seeking help from Faculty of Medicine services than Side-by-Side, including fear of impact on career (22.2% vs 2.5%; P < .01) and belief that the services would not be helpful (42.0% vs 23.5%; P = .02). NEXT STEPS: The authors plan to quantify well-being through academic engagement metrics as well as mental health outcome metrics in future studies. Future studies should also consider whether peer support increases help-seeking behaviors and/or the use of professional services.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Students, Medical , Counseling , Humans , Mental Health , Peer Group , Students, Medical/psychology
19.
Praxis (Bern 1994) ; 111(10): 539-548, 2022 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35920014

ABSTRACT

Interprofessional Training for Discharge Planning: Effects of Self-Efficacy in Nursing and Medical Students Abstract. Concordant and methodical briefing about a patient's disposition for discharge from hospital within the interprofessional ward round can facilitate a timely discharge. However, interprofessional ward rounds require not only professional skills but also knowledge of interprofessional cooperation between all the occupational groups involved. The question arose whether students of the various professions could learn the necessary competencies during their studies. To this end, a training course on interprofessional discharge planning was developed for nursing and medical students. The training includes four phases consisting of flipped classroom and interprofessional skills training. After each phase, a questionnaire was distributed to assess the self-efficacy of participating nursing and medical students regarding their interprofessional collaboration skills. The results showed that self-efficacy increased steadily with increasing study duration from phase 1 to 4. The study also shows that despite the differences between nursing and medical school curricula, students' self-efficacy regarding interprofessional collaboration skills increased during the IAVI training, which strongly suggests that they benefited from the training.


Subject(s)
Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Humans , Patient Discharge , Self Efficacy
20.
Georgian Med News ; (325): 7-12, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35920572

ABSTRACT

The rate of physical activity among young people worldwide has changed in recent decades. A sharp change in physical activity is observed in young people after they finish school and start studying at universities. This study showed the main patterns of the physical activity among the medical students in Georgia, as well as the effect of the global events. Incentive and inhibitory factors have also been identified that significantly determine the rate of increase and decrease. The aim of the study was to assess the physical activity rates of students at Tbilisi State Medical University. The physical activity level was studied by using the self-reported assessment by means of the specially developed questionnaire. The questionnaire was based on literary sources and expert opinion, and tested among peers. 34 questions covered demographic information (8), lifestyle and physical activity (16), exercising (5) and impact of COVID-19 (4). The survey through Google Forms was anonymous. Epidata 3.1 was used for data entry. The data were analysed in Stata 14.0. Descriptive statistics was used to generate frequencies, percentages and proportions. Where relevant, the Chi-square test was used to determine any statistical significance. Sampling frame consisted of the students of Tbilisi State Medical University. Respondents were chosen by the cluster random sampling method. Random cluster sampling was used with confidence interval/margin of error 10 and confidence level 95%. A total of 265 students participated in the study (Faculty of Medicine - 63.77%, Faculty of Public Health - 35.4%; first-year students - 41.13%, fourth-year students - 58.11%). More than 57.4% of the respondents consider themselves physically passive. 74.7% of them make less than 10,000 steps per day. 79.5% do not exercise regularly. Students explain their low level of physical activity by various reasons, such as COVID-19 pandemic (65.5%), smartphone use (56.6%), lack of free time (79.2%), lack of finances (40.8%) and motivation (54.3%). On the other hand, a relatively small proportion of respondents (30.6%) answered that they are physically active. They go by foot (26.3%), make 6,000 to 10,000 steps a day (17.4%) and prefer taking stairs (57.5%). They engage in a variety of physical activities, such as: sports, football, basketball, gym and home gym, swimming, aqua aerobics, dancing, cycling and walking. This study is the first on the lifestyle and physical activity of young people in Georgia during the Covid Pandemic. Trends related to the physical activity of students living in Georgia are similar in different countries around the world. Young people have common problems, obstacles or incentives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
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