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1.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 42: 1-8, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35503982

ABSTRACT

The rise of digital technologies such as telehealth, mobile apps, electronic medical records, and telementoring for rural primary care providers could provide opportunities for improving equity in cancer care delivery and outcomes. Benefitting from new technologies requires access to broadband internet, appropriate devices (smartphones, computers, etc.) along with basic digital literacy skills to use the devices. When these requirements are not met, the likelihood of widening existing inequities in access to care increases. This article introduces opportunities for improving cancer care using health informatics systems for engaging patients and flagging bias and existing videoconferencing technology to build workforce capacity. Policy recommendations for expanding evidence-based interventions are also highlighted, with the aim of mitigating the effects of workforce shortages and reducing persistent inequities in access to and quality of care.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Digital Technology , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Technology
3.
Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) ; 11(2): 196-207, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35533338

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic created a unique opportunity to study the effects of infection and vaccination on disease. The year 2020 was dominated by infection and its consequences. The year 2021 was dominated by vaccination and its consequences. It will still take several years for full maturation of databases required for robust epidemiological studies. Therefore, this review on the implications for neuro-ophthalmology draws on resources presently available including reported adverse reactions to vaccination. Illustrative clinical cases are presented.The spectrum of pathology following infection with SARS-CoV-2 falls into 4 main categories: autoimmune, vascular, sequelae of brain damage, and miscellaneous. This review is exhaustive, but the most common conditions discussed relate to headaches and associated symptoms; vertigo, diplopia, and nystagmus; vascular complications of the eye and brain; cranial nerve (mono-)neuropathies; photophobia, ocular discomfort, and optic neuritis. Of the 36 main adverse reactions reviewed, vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia is a novel complication requiring specific hematological management. Updated diagnostic criteria are summarized. It is relevant to remember taking a medication history because of side effects and to recognize the relevance of comorbidities. The clinical assessment can frequently be performed virtually. Consensus recommendations on telemedicine and the virtual assessment are summarized in a practical and compressed format.The review concludes with an epidemiological tetralogy to interrogate, in future studies, associations with (1) SARS-CoV-2 pandemic infection, (2) SARS-CoV-2 worldwide vaccination, and (3) the possibility of a rebound effect of infections in the pandemic aftermath.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
4.
J Hosp Med ; 17(4): 291-302, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35535926

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the proliferation of telehealth, uptake for acute inpatient services has been slower. Hospitalist shortages in rural and critical access hospitals as well as the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a renewed interest in telehealth to deliver acute inpatient services. Understanding current evidence is crucial for promoting uptake and developing evidence-based practices. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of telehealth applications in acute inpatient general medicine and pediatric hospital wards and synthesize available evidence. DATA SOURCES: A search of five databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, and ProQuest Theses, and Dissertations) using a combination of search terms including telemedicine and hospital medicine/inpatient care keywords yielded 17,015 citations. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Two independent coders determined eligibility based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted and organized into main categories based on findings: (1) feasibility and planning, (2) implementation and technology, and (3) telehealth application process and outcome measures. RESULTS: Of the 20 publications included, three were feasibility and planning studies describing the creation of the program, services provided, and potential cost implications. Five studies described implementation and technology used, including training, education, and evaluation methods. Finally, twelve discussed process and outcome measures, including patient and provider satisfaction and costs. CONCLUSION: Telehealth services for hospital medicine were found to be effective, well received, and initial cost estimates appear favorable. A variety of services were described across programs with considerable benefit appreciated by rural and smaller hospitals. Additional work is needed to evaluate clinical outcomes and overall program costs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Medicine , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Rural Population
5.
J Med Syst ; 46(6): 35, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35522342

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telehealth has demonstrated reduced cost and increased satisfaction post-operatively compared to Conventional Follow-up (CFU). However, a Flexible Care Pathway (FCP), which involves only "as-needed" follow-up, has never been formally evaluated. We hypothesize that the FCP is a safe and satisfactory for patients who undergo carpal (CTR)/ cubital tunnel release (CuTR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Preoperatively, veterans were given the option to enroll in the FCP, in which post-operative follow-up visits were "as-needed" only. Patients who chose CFU were evaluated within 2 weeks post-operatively. Preoperatively, detailed post-operative instructions were given to both groups. Both groups were contacted by phone 30 days post-operatively with a questionnaire. The main outcomes were the number of FCP to CFU conversions, complications, time and distance of patient travel, and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 105 patients were enrolled in the study, 60.2% chose FCP. One quarter (23.7%) of patients in the FCP group returned for in-person clinic evaluation. On average, the CFU group travelled a roundtrip distance of 102.9 miles and expended 3.51 h for their follow-up visits. CFU patients ranked their satisfaction at an average of 8.6/10, FCP patients ranked an average of 9.5/10 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The FCP can be used in ambulatory hand surgeries with a high degree of safety and satisfaction, studied up to 30 days post-operatively. The FCP demonstrated higher patient satisfaction and a decrease in patient travel than CFU. This is particularly relevant in geographically broad areas, in populations with less access to specialty care, and in a pandemic where contact is limited.


Subject(s)
Critical Pathways , Telemedicine , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , Postoperative Care
6.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(5): e34531, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35522461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the global burden of chronic conditions increases, their effective management is a concern. Although the need for chronic disease management using mobile self-management health care apps is increasing, there are still many barriers to their practical application in the primary care field. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effectiveness of primary care services combining a mobile self-management health care app with human coaching for patients with chronic diseases in the current primary care system. METHODS: A total of 110 patients (mean age 53.2, SD 9.2 years; 64 of 110, 58.2% female) with hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, or metabolic syndrome who visited one of 17 participating primary care clinics from September to November 2020 were included in this study. All participants recorded data regarding changes in body weight, sleep conditions, quality of life, depression, anxiety, stress, BMI, waist circumference, blood sugar levels, blood pressure, and blood lipids levels. The app user group (n=65) used a mobile self-management health care app with human coaching for 12 weeks, and the control group (n=45) underwent conventional self-managed health care. RESULTS: Patients in the app user group reported significantly more weight loss than those in the control group-the body weight of the app user group decreased by 1.43 kg (95% CI -2.07 to -0.79) and that of the control group decreased by 0.13 kg (95% CI -0.67 to 0.41; P=.002). The weight loss was markedly greater after using the app for 9 weeks than that when used for 4 weeks or 5-8 weeks (P=.002). Patients in the app user group reported better sleep quality (P=.04) and duration (P=.004) than those in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of primary care clinics and a mobile self-management health care app with human coaching results in better management of chronic conditions. This study shows that the primary care services combining a mobile self-management health care app with human coaching are effective in the current primary care system. An implication of this study is the possibility that a mobile self-management health care app with human coaching is a treatment option in the current primary care system.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Body Weight , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Mentoring/methods , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , Quality of Life , Weight Loss
7.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(5): e33735, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35522465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women's mobile health (mHealth) is a growing phenomenon in the mobile app global market. An increasing number of women worldwide use apps geared to female audiences (female technology). Given the often private and sensitive nature of the data collected by such apps, an ethical assessment from the perspective of data privacy, sharing, and security policies is warranted. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this scoping review and content analysis was to assess the privacy policies, data sharing, and security policies of women's mHealth apps on the current international market (the App Store on the Apple operating system [iOS] and Google Play on the Android system). METHODS: We reviewed the 23 most popular women's mHealth apps on the market by focusing on publicly available apps on the App Store and Google Play. The 23 downloaded apps were assessed manually by 2 independent reviewers against a variety of user data privacy, data sharing, and security assessment criteria. RESULTS: All 23 apps collected personal health-related data. All apps allowed behavioral tracking, and 61% (14/23) of the apps allowed location tracking. Of the 23 apps, only 16 (70%) displayed a privacy policy, 12 (52%) requested consent from users, and 1 (4%) had a pseudoconsent. In addition, 13% (3/23) of the apps collected data before obtaining consent. Most apps (20/23, 87%) shared user data with third parties, and data sharing information could not be obtained for the 13% (3/23) remaining apps. Of the 23 apps, only 13 (57%) provided users with information on data security. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the most popular women's mHealth apps on the market have poor data privacy, sharing, and security standards. Although regulations exist, such as the European Union General Data Protection Regulation, current practices do not follow them. The failure of the assessed women's mHealth apps to meet basic data privacy, sharing, and security standards is not ethically or legally acceptable.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Computer Security , Female , Humans , Information Dissemination , Policy , Privacy
8.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0267794, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35522660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a serious health condition, associated with high health care costs, and poor outcomes. Patient empowerment and self-care are a key component of successful HF management. The emergence of telehealth may enable providers to remotely monitor patients' statuses, support adherence to medical guidelines, improve patient wellbeing, and promote daily awareness of overall patients' health. OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of a voice activated technology for monitoring of HF patients, and its impact on HF clinical outcomes and health care utilization. METHODS: We conducted a randomized clinical trial; ambulatory HF patients were randomized to voice activated technology or standard of care (SOC) for 90 days. The system developed for this study monitored patient symptoms using a daily survey and alerted healthcare providers of pre-determined reported symptoms of worsening HF. We used summary statistics and descriptive visualizations to study the alerts generated by the technology and to healthcare utilization outcomes. RESULTS: The average age of patients was 54 years, the majority were Black and 45% were women. Almost all participants had an annual income below $50,000. Baseline characteristics were not statistically significantly different between the two arms. The technical infrastructure was successfully set up and two thirds of the invited study participants interacted with the technology. Patients reported favorable perception and high comfort level with the use of voice activated technology. The responses from the participants varied widely and higher perceived symptom burden was not associated with hospitalization on qualitative assessment of the data visualization plot. Among patients randomized to the voice activated technology arm, there was one HF emergency department (ED) visit and 2 HF hospitalizations; there were no events in the SOC arm. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the feasibility of remote symptom monitoring of HF patients using voice activated technology. The varying HF severity and the wide range of patient responses to the technology indicate that personalized technological approaches are needed to capture the full benefit of the technology. The differences in health care utilization between the two arms call for further study into the impact of remote monitoring on health care utilization and patients' wellbeing.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Feasibility Studies , Female , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Technology
10.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 609, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35524251

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older persons living with HIV (PLWH) need routine healthcare to manage HIV and other comorbidities. This mixed methods study investigated digital equity, constituted as access, use and quality, of HIV and specialty telehealth services for PLWH > 50 years during the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic when services transitioned to remote care. METHODS: A survey of closed and open-ended questions was administered to 80 English (N = 63) and Spanish (N = 17) speaking PLWH receiving HIV care at an Academic Medical Center (N = 50) or a Federally Qualified Health Center (N = 30) in New York State. Quantitative analyses examined characteristics predicting telehealth use and visit quality. Qualitative analyses utilized thematic coding to reveal common experiences. Results were integrated to deepen the interpretation. RESULTS: Telehealth access and use were shaped by multiple related and unstable factors including devices and connectivity, technology literacy, and comfort including privacy concerns. Participants demonstrated their substantial effort to achieve the visit. The majority of patients with a telehealth visit perceived it as worse than an in-person visit by describing it as less interpersonal, and resulting in poorer outcomes, particularly participants with less formal education. Technology was not only a barrier to access, but also influenced perceptions of quality. CONCLUSIONS: In the COVID-19 pandemic initial wave, barriers to using telehealth were unequally distributed to those with more significant access and use challenges. Beyond these barriers, examining the components of equity indicate further challenges replicating in-person care using telehealth formats for older PLWH. Work remains to establish telehealth as both equitable and desirable for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/therapy , Humans , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics
11.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 43(3): 194-201, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35524354

ABSTRACT

Background: Telehealth use increased during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to provide patient care while deferring to social distancing recommendations. Objective: Health-care provider and patient surveys were conducted to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the use and perception of telehealth visits for atopic and respiratory diseases. Methods: Health-care provider (N = 200) and patient (N = 200) surveys were conducted in the United States between September and October, 2020, and January, 2021. The participants were required to have used telehealth before or after March 1, 2020, the cutoff date selected to represent the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Before the pandemic, 40% of the health-care provider participants were conducting telehealth visits, which increased to 100% after the pandemic started. The average time spent per telehealth visit with patients increased from 13 to 16 minutes. A higher percentage of family medicine physicians/pediatricians had access to most monitoring tools than allergy/dermatology specialists both before the pandemic and after the pandemic started. Practice expenses reportedly increased after the pandemic started for 42% of participants. Before the pandemic, 27% of the patient participants used telehealth, which increased to 94% after the pandemic started. Ratings of "good" or "excellent" for the overall telehealth experience by the health-care provider participants improved from 44% before to 60% after the pandemic started, and by the patient participants improved from 77% to 88%. The willingness by the health-care provider participants to recommend telehealth to colleagues improved from 73% before to 83% after the pandemic started. The willingness by the patient participants to use telehealth again dropped slightly, from 94% to 89%. Conclusion: Telehealth visits for atopic and respiratory diseases increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Telehealth experiences were overall positive, particularly for the patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiration Disorders , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , United States/epidemiology
13.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 22(1): 116, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35501846

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Compliance to dietary recommendations by patients is the most difficult part of diabetes management. The nature of any educational method is to increase patients' awareness. But the question is, what is the effect of each method and for this purpose a comparative method should be considered. Therefore, this study was conducted to compare the effects of in-person education versus video tele-education on dietary regimen compliance in patients with T2DM. METHODS: In this trial, 378 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were random allocated into video tele-education, in-person education and control groups. The patients' weight and biochemical parameters were measured before educational programs and three-month later. RESULTS: The mean changes of patients' weight, glycemic parameters, and Lipid profiles decreased more in the two educational groups than the control group in a three-month period. There were no significant differences in the all study variables between the in-person and video education groups in post interventions except Total Cholesterol (TC). The pre- and post-intervention changes in the weight, TC, hemoglobin A1c, Triglyceride, and Very Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol were significant in both in-person group and video group. None of the educational programs had a significant impact on the Fasting blood sugar, Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol. DISCUSSION: Video tele-education was just as effective as in-person educational method on dietary regimen compliance among patients with T2DM in a three-month period. Therefore, it is recommended to use video tele-education in combination with or as an alternative to the in-person education method. This study provides support for diabetes educator. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This investigation was registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials Center ( IRCT20150302021307N4 ).


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Telemedicine , Cholesterol, LDL , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Iran/epidemiology
14.
Int J Equity Health ; 21(1): 58, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35501912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community-led interventions that address structural and social determinants of health are lacking among (im)migrant workers, especially seafood workers. This lack of medical attention is especially alarming given their high rate of injury and death. METHODS: Community-based participatory research (CBPR), a relational model that values the participants as equal partners in research, dissemination, and implementation, guided the interviews and mobile clinic. Seafood workers were engaged throughout data collection, analysis, and interpretation and played a significant role in moving the findings from research into actionable change. RESULTS: To address the lack of healthcare options for (im)migrants, and at the request of the seafood workers participating in the ongoing CBPR study, we successfully implemented and treated workers in our mobile clinic. DISCUSSION: Many of these individuals had not been seen by a healthcare provider in years, highlighting the importance of community trust and rapport building when addressing interconnected health and safety issues. CONCLUSIONS: Although CBPR and free (mobile) health clinics are in and of themselves not novel concepts, when applied to high-risk occupational settings with under-reached populations (e.g., (im)migrant workers), they have the ability to improve health and prevent injury. This intervention adds to the growing literature detailing the potential benefits of using CBPR, and meeting people where they are, especially with historically marginalized populations.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Transients and Migrants , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Community-Based Participatory Research , Humans , Social Determinants of Health
15.
Comput Intell Neurosci ; 2022: 7016554, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35510050

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, one of the most popular applications is cloud computing for storing data and information through World Wide Web. Since cloud computing has become available, users are rapidly increasing. Cloud computing enables users to obtain a better and more effective application at a lower cost in a more satisfactory way. Health services data must therefore be kept as safe and secure as possible because the release of this data could have serious consequences for patients. A framework for security and privacy must be employed to store and manage extremely sensitive data. Patients' confidential health records have been encrypted and saved in the cloud using cypher text so far. To ensure privacy and security in a cloud computing environment is a big issue. The medical system has been designed as a standard, access of records, and effective use by medical practitioners as required. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm along with implementation details as an effective and secure E-health cloud model using identity-based cryptography. The comparison of the proposed and existing techniques has been carried out in terms of time taken for encryption and decryption, energy, and power. Decryption time has been decreased up to 50% with the proposed method of cryptography. As it will take less time for decryption, less power is consumed for doing the cryptography operations.


Subject(s)
Computer Security , Telemedicine , Algorithms , Cloud Computing , Humans , Research Design
16.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(5): e229975, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507345

ABSTRACT

Importance: Type 2 diabetes is a prevalent and morbid condition. Poor engagement with self-management can contribute to diabetes-associated distress and hinder diabetes control. Objective: To evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of Empowering Patients in Chronic Care (EPICC), an evidence-based intervention to improve diabetes-associated distress and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels after the intervention and after 6-month maintenance. Design, Setting, and Participants: This hybrid (implementation-effectiveness) randomized clinical trial was performed in Veterans Affairs clinics across Illinois, Indiana, and Texas from July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2017. Participants included adults with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c level >8.0%) who received primary care during the prior year in participating clinics. Data collection was completed on November 30, 2018, and data analysis was completed on June 30, 2020. All analyses were based on intention to treat. Interventions: Participants in EPICC attended 6 group sessions based on a collaborative goal-setting theory led by health care professionals. Clinicians conducted individual motivational interviewing sessions after each group. Usual care was enhanced (EUC) with diabetes education. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome consisted of changes in HbA1c levels after the intervention and during maintenance. Secondary outcomes included the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS), Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, and Lorig Self-efficacy Scale. Secondary implementation outcomes included reach, adoption, and implementation (number of sessions attended per patient). Results: A total of 280 participants with type 2 diabetes (mean [SD] age, 67.2 [8.4] years; 264 men [94.3]; 134 non-Hispanic White individuals [47.9%]) were equally randomized to EPICC or EUC. Participants receiving EPICC had significant postintervention improvements in HbA1c levels (F1, 252 = 9.12, Cohen d = 0.36 [95% CI, 0.12-0.59]; P = .003) and DDS (F1, 245 = 9.06, Cohen d = 0.37 [95% CI, 0.13-0.60]; P = .003) compared with EUC. During maintenance, differences between the EUC and EPICC groups remained significant for DDS score (F1, 245 = 8.94, Cohen d = 0.36 [95% CI, 0.12-0.59]; P = .003) but not for HbA1c levels (F1, 252 = 0.29, Cohen d = 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.30]; P = .60). Improvements in DDS scores were modest. There were no differences between EPICC and EUC in improvements after intervention or maintenance for either adherence or self-efficacy. Among all 4002 eligible patients, 280 (7.0%) enrolled in the study (reach). Each clinic conducted all planned EPICC sessions and cohorts (100% adoption). The EPICC group participants attended a mean (SD) of 4.34 (1.98) sessions, with 54 (38.6%) receiving all 6 sessions. Conclusions and Relevance: A patient-empowerment approach using longitudinal collaborative goal setting and motivational interviewing is feasible in primary care. Improvements in HbA1c levels after the intervention were not sustained after maintenance. Modest improvements in diabetes-associated distress after the intervention were sustained after maintenance. Innovations to expand reach (eg, telemedicine-enabled shared appointments) and sustainability are needed. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01876485.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Self-Management , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Goals , Humans , Male
17.
Home Healthc Now ; 40(3): 139-145, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35510968

ABSTRACT

Interpersonal communication and teamwork are critical to patient safety. There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of formalized team training strategies such as simulation-based learning experiences to permit opportunities for deliberate practice and skill acquisition. However, there is a paucity of evidence examining the best method for delivery of simulation-based interprofessional education activities (Sim-IPE). The purpose of this project was to explore the effectiveness of using a Sim-IPE with a home-based patient assessment and intervention for students in undergraduate nursing, nurse practitioner, and physical therapy programs with the goal of enhancing interprofessional team communication and team performance. A mixed-methods, observational research design was used to evaluate teamwork and communication following virtual/web-based deliberate practice and a subsequent face-to-face Sim-IPE with telehealth. There were two distinct stages: (1) provision of interprofessional education elements of teamwork and communication via a virtual web-based platform to interprofessional student teams; (2) participation of all 29 student teams in a Sim-IPE activity using a standardized patient in a simulated home-based setting. Teams scored very high on an interprofessional communication and teamwork scale, and students strongly agreed that the prebriefing, scenario, and debriefing assisted in their learning. Students also valued exposure to telehealth and the ability to work with students from other health professions.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Home Care Services , Students, Nursing , Telemedicine , Communication , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Patient Care Team
18.
Home Healthc Now ; 40(3): 170-171, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35510974

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans
19.
J Med Syst ; 46(6): 34, 2022 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35511408

ABSTRACT

Digital health tools (DHT) are increasingly poised to change healthcare delivery given the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the drive to telehealth. Establishing the potential utility of a given DHT could aid in identifying how it could be best used and further opportunities for healthcare improvement. We propose a metric, a Utility Factor Score, which quantifies the benefits of a DHT by explicitly defining adherence and linking it directly to satisfaction and health goals met. To provide data for how the comparative utility score can or should work, we illustrate in detail the application of our metrics across four DHTs with two simulated users. The Utility Factor Score can potentially facilitate integration of DHTs into various healthcare settings and should be evaluated within a clinical study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics
20.
MMW Fortschr Med ; 164(9): 30, 2022 May.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35513656
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