Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 6.627
Filter
1.
Acta Trop ; 225: 106196, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34687640

ABSTRACT

Trichomoniasis is the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease; it is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis and seriously threatens human reproductive health. Telomeres are specialised DNA-protein complexes at the ends of chromosomes that have a protective function. The aim of the present study was to identify and characterise the telomeric DNA of T. vaginalis-which has not been previously reported-by multiple molecular methods including sequencing, the Bal nuclease (BAL) 31 nuclease assay, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and Southern blotting. We found numerous repeated units of TTTTAGGG in T. vaginalis genomic DNA digested with S1 nuclease in combination with XbaI restriction enzyme. The (TTTTAGGG)n tandem repeats were also highly sensitive to BAL 31 exonuclease digestion. We confirmed that the (TTTTAGGG)n repeats were located at the end of T. vaginalis chromosomes by FISH. Restriction enzyme digestion combined with Southern blotting using a digoxigenin-labelled (TTTTAGGG)5 probe showed that the T. vaginalis telomeric DNA length varied from 1.0 to 1.5 kb. This is the first report on the telomeric DNA sequence of T. vaginalis which includes the length and distribution on chromosomes; our findings lay a foundation for further study on telomere maintenance mechanisms in T. vaginalis.


Subject(s)
Trichomonas Infections , Trichomonas vaginalis , Base Sequence , DNA , Humans , Telomere/genetics , Trichomonas vaginalis/genetics
2.
Theriogenology ; 177: 151-156, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34700072

ABSTRACT

There are controversial reports on the restoration of eroded telomere length in offspring produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in different animal species. To the best of our knowledge, no earlier studies report the telomere length in naturally produced or cloned animals in any of the camelid species. Therefore, the present study was conducted to estimate the telomere length in dromedary camels produced by SCNT, the donor cells, and their age-matched naturally produced counterparts by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) length analysis and real-time Q PCR T/S ratio methods. Genomic DNA was extracted from venous blood collected from 6 cloned animals and their age-matched counterparts. Using the southern blot technique, digested DNA was blotted onto a positively charged nylon membrane, and its hybridization was carried out using telomere (TTAGGG)n specific, DIG-labeled hybridization probe (Roche Diagnostics, Germany) at 42 °C for 4 h. Stringent washes were carried out at the same temperature, followed by a chemiluminescence reaction. The signals were captured using the Azure Biosystems C600 gel documentation system. A TeloTool program from MATLAB software with a built-in probe intensity correction algorithm was used for TRF analysis. The experiment was replicated three times, and the data, presented as mean ± SEM, were analyzed using a two-sample t-test (MINITAB statistical software, Minitab ltd, CV3 2 TE, UK). No difference was found in the mean telomere length of cloned camels when compared to their naturally produced age-matched counterparts. However, the telomere length was more (P < 0.05) than that of the somatic cells used for producing the SCNT embryos. A moderate positive Pearson correlation coefficient (r = 0.6446) was observed between the telomere lengths estimated by TRF and Q PCR T/S ratio method. In conclusion, this is the first study wherein we are reporting telomere length in naturally produced and cloned dromedary camels produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. We found that telomere lengths in cloned camels were similar to their age-matched naturally produced counterparts, suggesting that the camel cytoplast reprograms the somatic cell nucleus and restores the telomere length to its totipotency stage.


Subject(s)
Camelus , Cloning, Organism , Animals , Cloning, Organism/veterinary , Embryo Transfer/veterinary , Nuclear Transfer Techniques/veterinary , Telomere/genetics
3.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 519, 2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34628468

ABSTRACT

Methamphetamine (METH) use, most prevalent in young adults, has been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The relationship between METH use and accelerated biological aging, which can be measured using leukocyte telomere length (LTL), remains unclear. We examined whether young adult METH users have shorter LTL and explored the relationship between characteristics of METH use and LTL by using Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis. We compared the LTL for 187 METH users and 159 healthy individuals aged between 25 and 34 years and examined the relationship of LTL with METH use variables (onset age, duration, and maximum frequency of METH use) by using regression analyses. In addition, 2-stage-least-squares (2SLS) MR was also performed to possibly avoid uncontrolled confounding between characteristics of METH use and LTL. We found METH users had significantly shorter LTL compared to controls. Multivariate regression analysis showed METH use was negatively associated with LTL (ß = -0.36, P < .001). Among METH users, duration of METH use was negatively associated with LTL after adjustment (ß = -0.002, P = .01). We identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6585206 genome-wide associated with duration of METH use. This SNP was used as an instrumental variable to avoid uncontrolled confounding for the relationship between the use duration and LTL shortening. In conclusion, we show that young adult METH users may have shorter LTL compared with controls and longer duration of METH use was significantly associated with telomere shortening. These observations suggest that METH use may accelerate biological senescence.


Subject(s)
Methamphetamine , Telomere , Adult , Aging , Humans , Leukocytes , Methamphetamine/adverse effects , Telomere/genetics , Telomere Shortening , Young Adult
4.
Biol Lett ; 17(10): 20210409, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34665991

ABSTRACT

As telomere length (TL) often predicts survival and lifespan, there is considerable interest in the origins of inter-individual variation in TL. Cross-generational effects of parental age on offspring TL are thought to be a key source of variation, but the rarity of longitudinal studies that examine the telomeres of successive offspring born throughout the lives of parents leaves such effects poorly understood. Here, we exploit TL measures of successive offspring produced throughout the long breeding tenures of parents in wild white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali) societies, to isolate the effects of within-parent changes in age on offspring TLs. Our analyses reveal the first evidence to date of a positive within-parent effect of advancing age on offspring TL: as individual parents age, they produce offspring with longer telomeres (a modest effect that persists into offspring adulthood). We consider the potential for pre- and post-natal mechanisms to explain our findings. As telomere attrition predicts offspring survival to adulthood in this species, this positive parental age effect could impact parent and offspring fitness if it arose via differential telomere attrition during offspring development. Our findings support the view that cross-generational effects of parental age can be a source of inter-individual variation in TL.


Subject(s)
Sparrows , Telomere , Animals , Animals, Wild , Longevity , Telomere/genetics , Telomere Shortening
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34638651

ABSTRACT

The telomeric transcriptome of Chironomus riparius has been involved in thermal stress response. One of the telomeric transcripts, the so-called CriTER-A variant, is highly overexpressed upon heat shock. On the other hand, its homologous variant CriTER-B, which is the most frequently encoded noncoding RNA in the telomeres of C. riparius, is only slightly affected by thermal stress. Interestingly, both transcripts show high sequence homology, but less is known about their folding and how this could influence their differential behaviour. Our study suggests that CriTER-A folds as two different conformers, whose relative proportion is influenced by temperature conditions. Meanwhile, the CriTER-B variant shows only one dominant conformer. Thus, a temperature-dependent conformational equilibrium can be established for CriTER-A, suggesting a putative functional role of the telomeric transcriptome in relation to thermal stress that could rely on the structure-function relationship of the CriTER-A transcripts.


Subject(s)
Chironomidae/genetics , RNA, Untranslated/genetics , Telomere/genetics , Transcriptome/genetics , Animals , Base Sequence , Heat-Shock Response/genetics , Hot Temperature
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34638655

ABSTRACT

DNA G-quadruplex (G4) structures, either within gene promoter sequences or at telomeres, have been extensively investigated as potential small-molecule therapeutic targets. However, although G4s forming at the telomeric DNA have been extensively investigated as anticancer targets, few studies focus on the telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), transcribed from telomeres, as potential pharmacological targets. Here, a virtual screening approach to identify a library of drug-like putative TERRA G4 binders, in tandem with circular dichroism melting assay to study their TERRA G4-stabilizing properties, led to the identification of a new hit compound. The affinity of this compound for TERRA RNA and some DNA G4s was analyzed through several biophysical techniques and its biological activity investigated in terms of antiproliferative effect, DNA damage response (DDR) activation, and TERRA RNA expression in high vs. low TERRA-expressing human cancer cells. The selected hit showed good affinity for TERRA G4 and no binding to double-stranded DNA. In addition, biological assays showed that this compound is endowed with a preferential cytotoxic effect on high TERRA-expressing cells, where it induces a DDR at telomeres, probably by displacing TERRA from telomeres. Our studies demonstrate that the identification of TERRA G4-targeting drugs with potential pharmacological effects is achievable, shedding light on new perspectives aimed at discovering new anticancer agents targeting these G4 structures.


Subject(s)
RNA/genetics , Telomere/genetics , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Binding Sites/drug effects , Binding Sites/genetics , DNA/genetics , DNA Damage/drug effects , DNA Damage/genetics , G-Quadruplexes/drug effects , Humans , Ligands , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Structure-Activity Relationship , Telomere/drug effects
7.
Mol Biol (Mosk) ; 55(5): 772-795, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34671004

ABSTRACT

Cell metabolism depends, to a large extent, on correct regulation of gene expression. One of the mechanisms of regulation is the formation of nucleic acid secondary structures, among which guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes, or G4) are of particular importance. G-quadruplexes are dynamic structures whose stability is determined by their size, ionic composition, and the nature of the nucleic acids forming them. They are regulated by various protein factors. Guanine quadruplexes play an important role in the regulation of many processes occurring in DNA and RNA, from maintaining telomere homeostasis to determining the ribosome landing site on mRNA. Therefore, these structures are considered a promising target for antitumor therapy, and their detailed study is important to modern biology. This review is focused on the structure and thermodynamic properties of G-quadruplexes together with their interaction with some nuclear proteins.


Subject(s)
G-Quadruplexes , DNA , RNA , Telomere/genetics , Thermodynamics
8.
Ann Oncol ; 32(12): 1608-1617, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34690007

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In glioma, TERT promoter mutation and loss of ATRX (ATRX loss) are associated with reactivation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), respectively, i.e. the two telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMM). Strangely, 25% of gliomas have been reported to display neither or both of these alterations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The C-circle (CC) assay was adapted to tumor (formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and frozen) and blood samples to investigate the TMM. RESULTS: We constructed a CC-based algorithm able to identify the TMM and reported a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 97.3% (n = 284 gliomas). By combining the TMM, the mutational status of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH) gene (IDHmt), and the histological grading, we propose a new classification tool: TeloDIAG. This classification defined five subtypes: tOD, tLGA, tGBM_IDHmt, tGBM, and tAIV, corresponding to oligodendroglioma, IDHmt low-grade astrocytoma, IDHmt glioblastoma, and IDHwt glioblastoma (GBM), respectively; the last class gathers ALT+ IDHwt gliomas that tend to be related to longer survival (21.2 months) than tGBM (16.5 months). The TeloDIAG was 99% concordant with the World Health Organization classification (n = 312), and further modified the classification of 55 of 144 (38%) gliomas with atypical molecular characteristics. As an example, 14 of 69 (20%) of TERTwt, ATRXwt, and IDHwt GBM were actually tAIV. Outstandingly, CC in blood sampled from IDHmt astrocytoma patients was detected with a sensitivity of 56% and a specificity of 97% (n = 206 gliomas and 30 healthy donors). CONCLUSION: The TeloDIAG is a new, simple, and effective tool helping in glioma diagnosis and a promising option for liquid biopsy.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms , Glioma , Brain Neoplasms/diagnosis , Brain Neoplasms/genetics , Glioma/diagnosis , Glioma/genetics , Humans , Isocitrate Dehydrogenase/genetics , Liquid Biopsy , Telomere/genetics , X-linked Nuclear Protein/genetics
9.
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol ; 167: 103510, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34695574

ABSTRACT

In the last decades the association of leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and mitochondrial copy number (mtDNAcn) with cancer risk has been the focus of many reports, however the relation is not yet completely understood. A meta-analysis of 112 studies including 64,184 cancer cases and 278,641 controls that analysed LTL and mtDNAcn in relation to cancer risk has been conducted to further our understanding of the topic. Stratified analyses for tumor type were also performed. Overall, no association was observed for all cancer combined neither for LTL nor mtDNAcn. Significant associations were detected for these biomarkers and specific cancer type; however, a large degree of heterogeneity was present, even within the same tumor type. Alternatives approaches based on polymorphic variants, such as polygenic risk scores and mendelian randomization, could be adopted to unravel the causal correlation of telomere length and mitochondrial copy number with cancer risk.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Telomere , DNA Copy Number Variations , DNA, Mitochondrial/genetics , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , Mitochondria/genetics , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Telomere/genetics
10.
J Affect Disord ; 295: 1032-1039, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34706411

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Shorter telomere length is a putative biomarker of accelerated aging and has been associated with affective disorders and mortality. Psychological factors and behaviors associated with telomere shortening are yet to be clarified. Here, we investigate the association between history of suicide attempts and telomere length in patients with affective disorders. METHODS: Leucocyte telomere length was determined by quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) in patients with affective disorders (n = 248) including bipolar disorders type I (n = 159), type II (n = 67), major depressive disorder (n = 22), and healthy controls (n = 401). Diagnosis, duration of illness, and age at onset were assessed using the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I). Number of lifetime suicide attempts were based on self-reports. Effect size was calculated using Cohen's d. RESULTS: Telomere length was reduced in patients with affective disorders relative to healthy controls (d = 0.18, F = 5.26, p = 0.02). Among patients, a higher number of suicide attempts was associated with shorter telomere length (ß = -0.24, t = -3.83, CI = -0.44 to -0.14, p < 0.001), also when controlling for duration of illness and age at onset (ß = -.23, CI = -.42 to -.12, p = 0.001). Multiple suicide attempts were associated with telomere length reduction comparable to eight years lifespan, adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: While longitudinal data are needed to clarify the temporal course, previous suicide attempts and related distress may accelerate telomere shortening and aging in patients with affective disorders.


Subject(s)
Depressive Disorder, Major , Telomere , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/genetics , Humans , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/genetics , Suicide, Attempted , Telomere/genetics , Telomere Shortening/genetics
11.
Kidney Int ; 100(5): 980-983, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34688387

ABSTRACT

Telomere length is considered as a clock mirroring aging and is influenced by oxidative stress and inflammation. Both conditions are highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease and other degenerative disorders, such as cardiovascular disease. However, it is discussed controversially whether short telomeres are causally associated with chronic kidney disease or whether chronic kidney disease is contributing to an attrition of telomere length. Park et al., in this issue of Kidney International, use an extended 2-sample Mendelian randomization analysis with large data sets to shed new light on this research question.


Subject(s)
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Telomere , Aging/genetics , Humans , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/genetics , Telomere/genetics , Telomere Shortening
12.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 69(9): 11-12, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34585887

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although metabolic surgery has been shown to offer beneficial primary outcome results in obese individuals / obese Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, there is paucity of information on the underlying mechanisms. In the recent years, estimations of non-invasive molecular parameters viz., telomere length and mtDNA copy number (mtDNAcn) assume significance as robust biomarkers. However, there is lack of evidence about this especially, in the Indian context. To assess the changes in the telomere length and mtDNAcn levels after metabolic surgery in obese Asian Indians with dysglycemia along with routine measurements of anthropometry, glycemic/lipidimic parameters and inflammatory markers. METHODS: This study is a prospective one-year follow-up study of 16 obese individuals with dysglycemia who underwent metabolic surgery at a tertiary diabetes centre in South India. Telomere length, mtDNAcn, serum adiponectin, glycated haemoglobin and high- sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were analysed before surgery and at 6 and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in weight (p<0.001), BMI (p<0.001), waist circumference (p<0.001), fasting and postprandial glucose (p<0.05), HbA1c (p<0.001), triglycerides (p<0.05), hs CRP (p<0.05) and increase in serum adiponectin (p<0.05) at 6 and 12 months post-surgery compared to the preoperative status. There was a significant reduction in mtDNAcn (p<0.001) and a significant increase in telomere length (p<0.001) at 6 and 12 months post metabolic surgery. CONCLUSION: We report an increase in telomere length and decrease in circulatory mtDNA copy number levels at 6 and 12 months post metabolic surgery in obese individuals with T2DM in India.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , DNA, Mitochondrial/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Obesity/complications , Obesity/genetics , Prospective Studies , Telomere/genetics
13.
Elife ; 102021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34545807

ABSTRACT

Human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/6B) are ubiquitous pathogens that persist lifelong in latent form and can cause severe conditions upon reactivation. They are spread by community-acquired infection of free virus (acqHHV6A/6B) and by germline transmission of inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6A/6B (iciHHV-6A/6B) in telomeres. We exploited a hypervariable region of the HHV-6B genome to investigate the relationship between acquired and inherited virus and revealed predominantly maternal transmission of acqHHV-6B in families. Remarkably, we demonstrate that some copies of acqHHV-6B in saliva from healthy adults gained a telomere, indicative of integration and latency, and that the frequency of viral genome excision from telomeres in iciHHV-6B carriers is surprisingly high and varies between tissues. In addition, newly formed short telomeres generated by partial viral genome release are frequently lengthened, particularly in telomerase-expressing pluripotent cells. Consequently, iciHHV-6B carriers are mosaic for different iciHHV-6B structures, including circular extra-chromosomal forms that have the potential to reactivate. Finally, we show transmission of an HHV-6B strain from an iciHHV-6B mother to her non-iciHHV-6B son. Altogether, we demonstrate that iciHHV-6B can readily transition between telomere-integrated and free virus forms.


Subject(s)
DNA, Viral/genetics , Genome, Viral , Herpesvirus 6, Human/genetics , Telomere/genetics , Virus Integration , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Male , Saliva/virology
14.
BMC Genomics ; 22(1): 688, 2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34551706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic organisms, like the model yeast S. cerevisiae, have linear chromosomes that facilitate organization and protection of nuclear DNA. A recent work described a stepwise break/repair method that enabled fusion of the 16 chromosomes of S. cerevisiae into a single large chromosome. Construction of this strain resulted in the removal of 30 of 32 telomeres, over 300 kb of subtelomeric DNA, and 107 subtelomeric ORFs. Despite these changes, characterization of the single chromosome strain uncovered modest phenotypes compared to a reference strain. RESULTS: This study further characterized the single chromosome strain and found that it exhibited a longer lag phase, increased doubling time, and lower final biomass concentration compared with a reference strain when grown on YPD. These phenotypes were amplified when ethanol was added to the medium or used as the sole carbon source. RNAseq analysis showed poor induction of genes involved in diauxic shift, ethanol metabolism, and fatty-acid ß-oxidation during growth on ethanol compared to the reference strain. Enzyme-constrained metabolic modeling identified decreased flux through the enzymes that are encoded by these poorly induced genes as a likely cause of diminished biomass accumulation. The diminished growth on ethanol for the single chromosome strain was rescued by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of sirtuin family deacetylases, which have been shown to silence gene expression in heterochromatic regions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that sirtuin-mediated silencing in the single chromosome strain interferes with growth on non-fermentable carbon sources. We propose that the removal of subtelomeric DNA that would otherwise be bound by sirtuins leads to silencing at other loci in the single chromosome strain. Further, we hypothesize that the poorly induced genes in the single chromosome strain during ethanol growth could be silenced by sirtuins in wildtype S. cerevisiae during growth on glucose.


Subject(s)
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Drug Tolerance , Ethanol , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics , Telomere/genetics
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34576030

ABSTRACT

Clinical evidence suggests that conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors cannot explain all CVD incidences. Recent studies have shown that telomere attrition, clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP), and atherosclerosis (telomere-CHIP-atherosclerosis, TCA) evolve to play a crucial role in CVD. Telomere dynamics and telomerase have an important relationship with age-related CVD. Telomere attrition is associated with CHIP. CHIP is commonly observed in elderly patients. It is characterized by an increase in blood cell clones with somatic mutations, resulting in an increased risk of hematological cancer and atherosclerotic CVD. The most common gene mutations are DNA methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A), Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (TET2), and additional sex combs-like 1 (ASXL1). Telomeres, CHIP, and atherosclerosis increase chronic inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Currently, their epidemiology and detailed mechanisms related to the TCA axis remain incompletely understood. In this article, we reviewed recent research results regarding the development of telomeres and CHIP and their relationship with atherosclerotic CVD.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferases/genetics , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Dioxygenases/genetics , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Aging/genetics , Aging/pathology , Atherosclerosis/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Clonal Evolution/genetics , Clonal Hematopoiesis/genetics , Humans , Mutation/genetics , Telomere/genetics
16.
Epidemiol Health ; 43: e2021063, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34525499

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Data on associations between body temperature (BT) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which has been widely used as a biomarker of cellular senescence in recent epidemiological studies, are limited. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the associations between a normal BT range (35.0-37.5°C) and LTL via 6-year longitudinal observations of 2,004 male and female adults aged 50 or older. METHODS: BT was obtained by measuring the tympanic temperature, and relative LTL was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Robust regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the baseline and follow-up LTL values and their differences. RESULTS: A significant inverse association was found between BT and LTL at baseline. The regression coefficient estimate was -0.03 (95% confidence interval, -0.07 to -0.001; p<0.05). This association was stronger in participants with a body mass index >25 kg/m2 and males (p<0.01). However, there were no associations between BT and LTL at follow-up or BT and 6-year longitudinal differences in LTL. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that having a high BT between 35°C and 37.5°C (95°F and 99°F) may be detrimental for obese individuals in terms of biological aging.


Subject(s)
Body Temperature , Telomere , Aged , Female , Humans , Leukocytes , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Republic of Korea , Telomere/genetics , Temperature
17.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 227: 108982, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34482039

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Drug dependence promotes accelerated aging and higher mortality compare with the general population. Telomere length is a biomarker of determination of cellular aging. Telomere attrition has been reported in heroin dependent patients. To investigate whether telomere length is affected by morphine or not, the expressions of hTERT and TERF2 in morphine treated human SH-SY5Y cells were determined and compared with untreated cells. METHODS: The SH-SY5Y cells were treated with 1 and 5 µM concentrations of morphine for different exposure times (1d, 2d, 3d, 7d and 60 days). The mRNA levels of hTERT and TERF2 were determined using quantitative real-time RCR. The relative telomere length was measured as the ratio of telomere/36B4. RESULTS: The hTERT and TERF2 mRNA levels were down regulated in morphine treated cells as a function of exposure duration. These alterations were reversible if morphine was removed from the culture medium. No reduction in the relative expression of hTERT and TERF2 in the cells exposed to N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) plus morphine was observed. In the SH-SY5Y cells treated by 5 µM morphine for 60 consecutive days, the hTERT and TERF2 mRNA levels and relative telomere lengths remarkably decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Reversible alteration of mRNA levels by removing morphine from culture medium, and effect of NAC in co-treatment of morphine plus NAC, emphasize the role of reactive oxygen species in down-regulation of the expression of hTERT and TERF2 by morphine. Telomere attrition in morphine treated cells is a consequence of down-regulation of the expression of hTERT and TERF2.


Subject(s)
Telomerase , Telomere , Down-Regulation , Humans , Morphine/pharmacology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Telomerase/genetics , Telomerase/metabolism , Telomere/genetics , Telomere/metabolism , Telomeric Repeat Binding Protein 2
18.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 16(1): 395, 2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34565437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telomere biology disorders (TBD) such as dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) lead to progressive multi-organ failure as impaired telomere maintenance disturbs cellular proliferative capacity. A wide range of hepatic manifestations from asymptomatic liver enzyme elevation to overt liver fibrosis/cirrhosis can be observed in TBD patients. However, the incidence of hepatic involvement remains unknown. Non-invasive transient elastography (TE) predicts early fibrosis by measuring liver stiffness and may uncover subclinical liver damage in TBD patients. METHODS: Liver screening procedures of nine TBD patients from the Aachen TBD Registry are being presented retrospectively. Following clinical suspicion, TBD was diagnosed using flow-FISH with telomere length (TL) below the 1% percentile and confirmed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) detecting pathogenic mutations in telomere maintenance genes TERC or TERT. RESULTS: In all patients, TBD was first diagnosed in adulthood. Patients showed normal to slightly elevated liver function test parameters. Hepatic ultrasound revealed inhomogeneous parenchyma in seven (77.7%) and increased liver echogenicity in four patients (44.4%). Median liver stiffness was 10.7 kilopascal (kPa) (interquartile range 8.4, 15.7 kPa). Using 7.1 kPa as cut-off, 88.8% of patients were classified as moderate fibrosis to cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: Subclinical chronic liver involvement is frequent in patients with adult-onset TBD. TE could have a valuable role in the routine work-up of patients with telomere disorders including DKC for early detection of patients at risk for liver function impairment.


Subject(s)
Dyskeratosis Congenita , Elasticity Imaging Techniques , Adult , Biology , Dyskeratosis Congenita/genetics , Humans , Liver/diagnostic imaging , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnostic imaging , Liver Cirrhosis/genetics , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Telomere/genetics
19.
Cytogenet Genome Res ; 161(6-7): 297-304, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34433164

ABSTRACT

Werner syndrome (WS) is an accelerated ageing disease caused by multiple mutations in the gene encoding the Werner DNA helicase (WRN). The major clinical features of WS include wrinkles, grey hair, osteoporosis, and metabolic phenomena such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and fatty liver, and resemble those seen in normal ageing, but occur earlier, in middle age. Defective DNA repair resulting from mutations in WRN explain the majority of the clinical features of WS, but the underlying mechanisms driving the larger metabolic dysfunction remain elusive. Recent studies in animal models of WS and in WS patient cells and blood samples suggest the involvement of impaired mitophagy, NAD+ depletion, and accumulation of damaged mitochondria in metabolic dysfunction. This mini-review summarizes recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of metabolic dysfunction in WS, with the involvement of DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, mitophagy reduction, stem cell impairment, and senescence. Future studies on NAD+ and mitophagy may shed light on potential therapeutic strategies for the WS patients.


Subject(s)
Aging/genetics , DNA Damage , Mitochondria/genetics , Mitophagy/genetics , Stem Cells/metabolism , Werner Syndrome/genetics , Animals , Cellular Senescence/genetics , Humans , Mitochondria/metabolism , Telomere/genetics , Telomere/metabolism , Werner Syndrome/metabolism , Werner Syndrome/pathology
20.
Kidney Int ; 100(5): 1063-1070, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34339747

ABSTRACT

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent in the elderly population. However, it is rarely investigated whether kidney function is causally linked to biological aging itself. In this Mendelian randomization study, genetic instruments for telomere attrition were applied to a CKDGen genome wide association study results for 41,395 cases of CKD among 480,698 individuals as summary-level Mendelian randomization. A replicative analysis was performed by polygenic score analysis using independent United Kingdom Biobank data for 8,118 cases of CKD among 321,024 white individuals of British ancestry. Reverse-direction Mendelian randomization analysis was performed utilizing genetic instruments for log-estimated glomerular filtration rate change with Z-standardized telomere length outcome data for 326,075 participants in the UK Biobank. Genetic predisposition toward telomere attrition (one Z score decrease in length) was found to be a causative factor for a higher CKD risk [Odds Ratio 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.08‒1.33)], as supported by pleiotropy-robust Mendelian randomization sensitivity analyses implemented using the CKDGen data. Based on United Kingdom Biobank data, the polygenic score for telomere attrition was significantly associated with a higher risk of CKD [1.20 (1.04‒1.39)]. In reverse-direction Mendelian randomization, the genetically predicted kidney function decrease was significantly associated with a higher degree of telomere attrition [beta 0.039 (0.009‒0.069)]. Thus, our study supports the causal linkage between telomere attrition and kidney function impairment.


Subject(s)
Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Aged , Genome-Wide Association Study , Glomerular Filtration Rate/genetics , Humans , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/genetics , Telomere/genetics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...