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1.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10974, 2024 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38744911

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to explore seasonal variations in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) prevalence in South Korea, utilizing nationwide population-based big data. Data corresponding to the Korean Standard Classification of Diseases code of K07.6, which identifies TMD, were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service online platform for the period from 2010 to 2022. Additionally, we integrated these data with climate temperature records from the Korean Meteorological Administration. We subsequently conducted a statistical analysis of TMD patient data on a monthly and seasonal basis over the past 13 years to assess prevalence. Over the past 13 years, the number of TMD patients in Korea has steadily increased. The prevalence of TMD rose from 0.48% (224,708 out of a total population of 50,515,666) in 2010 to 0.94% (482,241 out of a total population of 51,439,038) in 2022, marking a 1.96-fold increase. Among children under 10 years of age, no significant differences were observed in TMD prevalence between boys and girls. However, a distinct female predominance emerged after the age of 10, with an average female-to-male ratio of 1.51:1. The peak prevalence of TMD occurred in individuals in their 20 s, followed by adolescents in their late 10 s. The majority of TMD patients were concentrated in Seoul and Gyeonggi province, with metropolitan areas accounting for 50% of the total patient count. Seasonally, TMD patient numbers showed no significant increase in winter compared with spring or summer. The temperature difference, defined as the absolute difference between the highest and lowest temperatures for each month, showed a positive correlation with TMD patient counts. A greater temperature difference was associated with higher patient counts. The strongest correlation between temperature differences and TMD patient numbers was observed in winter (r = 0.480, p < 0.01), followed by summer (r = 0.443, p < 0.01), and spring (r = 0.366, p < 0.05). Temperature differences demonstrated a significantly stronger correlation with the increase in the number of TMD patients than absolute climate temperatures. This aspect should be a key consideration when examining seasonal trends in TMD prevalence in South Korea.


Subject(s)
Seasons , Temperature , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Male , Female , Child , Prevalence , Adolescent , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Climate , Aged , Child, Preschool
2.
J Int Med Res ; 52(4): 3000605241242582, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38603608

ABSTRACT

This narrative review aims to demonstrate and summarize the complex relationship between Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) by reviewing the results of observational studies and case reports. EDS are a set of hereditary connective tissue disorders, where generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), especially in the hypermobile subtype (hEDS), is a key symptom. Mutations have been identified in genes that impact the production or assembly of collagen for all subtypes except hEDS. While the correlation between GJH and TMD has been analysed in various studies, fewer studies have examined TMD in patients with EDS, with most showing an increased prevalence of TMD. In case-control studies, an elevated prevalence of myalgia, arthralgia and disc-related disorders was found in individuals with EDS. Various therapeutic interventions have been reported within the literature in the form of case reports and observational studies, but there are no long-term clinical trials with results on the efficacy of different therapeutic approaches to date. This review demonstrates the high prevalence of different TMDs in different subtypes of EDS, but also shows that little is known about the success of treatment thus far. Further clinical research is necessary to provide adequate guidance on targeted treatment.


Subject(s)
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome , Joint Instability , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/complications , Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/diagnosis , Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/genetics , Joint Instability/complications , Joint Instability/epidemiology , Collagen , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/etiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies
3.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 131(4): 151-158, 2024 04.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591118

ABSTRACT

What is the prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis? 3 groups (of 50 participants each) were examined for a possible TMD diagnosis: 1. patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, 2. at-risk individuals, and 3. healthy controls. A possible association with bruxism, determined on the basis of self-reporting and clinical features, was also examined. At-risk patients had a higher prevalence of TMD pain diagnoses compared to healthy controls (p = 0.046). Within the early rheumatoid arthritis group, seronegative patients had a higher prevalence of TMD pain diagnoses than seropositive patients (p = 0.048). No further differences in the prevalence of TMD diagnoses were found between the groups. Participants with a TMD pain diagnosis were more often diagnosed with probable sleep bruxism than those without a TMD pain diagnosis. The prevalence of TMD pain is increased in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative early rheumatoid arthritis patients, and is associated with signs of bruxism.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Bruxism , Sleep Bruxism , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Bruxism/epidemiology , Bruxism/complications , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sleep Bruxism/epidemiology , Facial Pain/epidemiology , Facial Pain/etiology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology
4.
Acta Odontol Scand ; 83: 210-218, 2024 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38682700

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Maxillofacial diseases may pose a risk factor for the onset of tinnitus, and may influence the severity of its symptoms. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tinnitus among patients routinely visiting the Faculty of Dentistry and to assess the relationship between tinnitus and maxillofacial diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cross-sectional study conducted on 3,626 patients. Demographic data, information on tinnitus symptoms, temporomandibular disorder (TMD) presence, the existence of trigger points in masticatory muscles, toothache, and bruxism were evaluated. RESULTS: Tinnitus was detected in 385 patients, resulting in a prevalence rate of 10.61%. Of the patients, 38.4% were male and 61.6% were female, and the mean age was 42.66 ± 16.34 years. Tinnitus was categorised as normal in 47.8% of the patients and pathological in 52.2% of the patients. Bruxism was identified in 65.5% of the patients, toothache in 42.9%, TMD in 33.8%, and masticatory trigger points in 27.0% of the patients. A tendency towards tinnitus provoked by toothache was observed in 5.9% of the patients. The presence of pathological tinnitus was found to increase the risk by 1.839 times for toothache and 1.456 times for bruxism. CONCLUSION: There may be an association between oral and maxillofacial diseases and tinnitus, especially bruxism and toothache. Therefore, the evaluation of these conditions may be a routine part of tinnitus management.


Subject(s)
Tinnitus , Humans , Tinnitus/epidemiology , Female , Male , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prevalence , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Aged , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Adolescent , Risk Factors
5.
Neurol Clin ; 42(2): 573-584, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38575267

ABSTRACT

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headache disorders are highly prevalent in the population. TMDs can present headache symptoms as a secondary headache and, in addition, be comorbid with primary headache disorders. This overlap has significant clinical implications for which it is essential for the physician to be aware, and they should screen for the potential presence of TMDs in a headache patient. Bruxism is a parafunctional behavior also prevalent in the population which has a role in TMDs and may influence headache symptomatology, but it is still necessary to clarify this relationship.


Subject(s)
Bruxism , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Bruxism/complications , Bruxism/diagnosis , Bruxism/epidemiology , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/etiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Comorbidity
6.
Cranio ; 42(3): 253-258, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38573060

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and their effects on quality of life (QoL) of dental patients. METHODS: A survey consisting of two validated questionnaires was distributed to dental patients registered at the University of Malaya Faculty of Dentistry. The Fonseca Anamnestic Index (FAI) evaluates the prevalence and severity of TMD, while the Oral Health Impact Profile - Temporomandibular Disorder (OHIP-TMD) appraises the effects of TMD on oral health-related QoL. RESULTS: Out of 342 patients (aged 16 to 50 years, 45% male and 55% female) enrolled in the survey, 50.9% had varying degrees of TMD. All 7 domains of OHIP-TMD showed a statistically significant correlation with TMD severity. CONCLUSION: TMD seems to be prevalent among Malaysian dental patients. Not only does TMD affect the QoL of an individual, but the more severe the degree of reported symptoms, the poorer their perceived oral health QoL.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Female , Humans , Male , Malaysia/epidemiology , Oral Health , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged
7.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38480071

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The comorbidities between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and somatization and their associations with personality traits, emotional disorders, and sleep disturbances were investigated. STUDY DESIGN: Adults aged 18 to 24 years completed an electronic survey encompassing TMD symptoms (5Ts), Patient Health Questionnaire-15, Big Five Personality Inventory-10, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data were assessed using non-parametric tests/correlation analysis and logistic regression analysis (α = 0.05). RESULTS: The sample comprised 365 participants, of whom 22.2% and 19.5% were 5Ts-negative without and with somatization, respectively, and 18.1% and 40.3% were 5Ts-positive without and with somatization, respectively. Significant differences in neuroticism, distress, depression, anxiety, stress, and sleep quality were observed between 5Ts-negative participants with somatization and 5Ts-positive participants with somatization compared with 5Ts-negative participants without somatization and 5Ts-positive participants without somatization. Distress, anxiety, stress, and sleep were moderately correlated with somatic but not TMD symptoms (rs = 0.45-0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of whether they had TMDs, participants with somatization exhibited heightened levels of neuroticism and emotional and sleep disturbances.


Subject(s)
Comorbidity , Sleep Wake Disorders , Somatoform Disorders , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Male , Somatoform Disorders/epidemiology , Somatoform Disorders/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Adolescent , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult , Personality Inventory , Personality , Patient Health Questionnaire
8.
Head Face Med ; 20(1): 19, 2024 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38515168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigates the relationship between professional and recreational singing on temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) in women compared to a nonsinging control group. METHODS: A total of 288 female subjects between the ages of 18 and 45 participated in the self-assessment questionnaire including demographic data, as well as questions on vocal practice and TMDs symptoms. Depending on the singing time per week, the (non)vocalists were assigned to the groups professional (n = 96), recreational (n = 96) and nonsingers (n = 96). RESULTS: The TMDs prevalence in professional singers (42%) was higher than that in recreational singers (31%) and noticeably higher than that in nonsingers (25%). The Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact test showed that the differences between the groups were not noticeable (p = .053) but could be formulated as tendencies. The professionals suffered much more from restricted jaw movement (p = .004; OR = 2.718; 95% CI = 1.409-5.242), temporomandibular joint sounds (p < .009; OR = 2.267; 95% CI = 1.264-4.064) and temporomandibular pain (p = .010; OR = 2.333; 95% CI = 1.264-4.308) than nonsingers. CONCLUSIONS: Singing might have an enhancing effect on the appearance of TMDs. In particular, professional singers suffered more from self-reported TMDs than recreational singers and nonsingers. In addition to the high level of physical workload if participating in professional singing, the psychosocial impact should be investigated more in further studies. No new treatment strategies resulted from this study, as the etiological significance of singing is still unclear. Knowledge about risk factors for multifactorial TMDs can help practitioners and patients prevent and treat TMDs.


Subject(s)
Singing , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Self-Assessment , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pain
9.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(6): 992-997, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38433411

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Foramen tympanicum (FT) is a defect located anterior-inferior to the external acoustic meatus. We evaluated its prevalence, location, size, and relationship with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. METHODS: Cone beam computed tomography was performed for 200 patients who presented to the Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University Ahmet Kelesoglu Faculty of Dentistry Hospital. The location and size of the FT in the axial and sagittal planes were evaluated. Descriptive statistics were used to compare the study parameters among age and sex groups. Patients with FT were reevaluated by two maxillofacial surgeons at the study centre. RESULTS: In total, 200 images from 400 joints were examined. Unilateral and bilateral FT (19 [9.5%] and 8 [4%], respectively) was detected in 35 (17.5%) images from 27 (13.5%) patients. Examinations were performed for TMJ disorders in 24 patients. Participants with bilateral defects had the highest rates of presence of sounds and ear pain on the left and right sides (p < .05). CONCLUSION: Foramen tympanicum can lead to TMJ disorders and spread of tumours or infections from the external auditory canal to the infratemporal fossa. The increased prevalence of such disorders in patients with bilateral FT suggests an association between them.


Subject(s)
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , Prevalence , Temporal Bone/diagnostic imaging , Aged
10.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 342, 2024 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38493079

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study focuses on temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), which affect the temporomandibular joint and related muscles and have multiple causes. Recent studies have examined the connection between menstrual cycles, estrogen levels, and TMDs, but results are inconsistent, highlighting the need for more research. The aim is to explore the prevalence of TMDs in pregnant women and consider how hormonal changes during pregnancy might influence these disorders. METHODS: In this cross-sectional case-control study, we compared 32 pregnant women with 35 non-pregnant women. We evaluated several TMD-related factors such as pain levels, chronic pain classification, scores on the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale-20 and Oral Behaviors Checklist, and psychological health. We used various statistical methods including descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, linear regression, and adjustments for multiple comparisons to analyze the data. RESULTS: Pregnant women showed different pain perceptions, generally reporting less pain and lower severity. Nonetheless, these differences were not uniform across all TMD-related measures. Linear regression did not find a consistent link between pregnancy and TMD scores, except for chronic pain grade, which was not significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. There was a significant relationship between depression and TMD severity, emphasizing the need to consider mental health in TMD evaluations. DISCUSSION: The findings suggest that pregnancy is neither a risk nor a protective factor for TMD. Differences in pain perception, functional status, and psychological health were observed in pregnant women but were not consistent for all TMD-related aspects. The role of estrogen in TMJ health and TMD risk is complex and requires further study. The research highlights the necessity of including mental health, especially depression, in TMD assessments. More comprehensive research with larger sample sizes is essential to better understand the connections between pregnancy, TMD, and hormones, aiming to improve TMD management in pregnant women and others.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Facial Pain , Case-Control Studies , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Estrogens
11.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(6): 1081-1090, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38449443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This global bibliometric review aimed to investigate trends in publications relating to tinnitus and TMD. METHODS: A search was performed in eight databases (June/2022), by independent researchers with relevant keywords about tinnitus and TMD, without restriction of date or language. Original research or case report/series evaluating prevalence, association and risk related to tinnitus and TMD were included. Independent examiners selected studies by title and abstract and performed data extraction. Data about publication and researchers, study population, objective, study design and diagnostic criteria for tinnitus and TMD were exported to VintagePoint® for bibliometric analyses. Data about the direct association between tinnitus and TMD were extracted. RESULTS: One hundred and seventeen articles from 25 countries were included, most observational (68.4%) and evaluating association (N = 60; 44.8%). Among the 60 studies of association, 22 (36.6%) presented results of a direct association between the presence/absence of tinnitus and the presence/absence of TMD. Brazil (19.5%) and the United States (12.7%) were the countries with the most publications, and Dentistry (48.6%) was the main publication area. A growth in publications in Dentistry was observed in the past 30 years and in the past 10 years in Medicine. Half of the studies included the elderly population (50.2%). The main diagnostic criterion for both tinnitus (37.8%) and TMD (28%) was general questionnaires and/or self-report. CONCLUSION: There is a growing trend in publications relating to tinnitus and TMD, especially in Dentistry, with a predominance of observational and association studies in the elderly population using questionnaires and/or self-report. More research with robust diagnostic methods and other study designs should be encouraged in the future.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Tinnitus , Humans , Tinnitus/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Prevalence , Global Health
12.
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 62(3): 318-323, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38355385

ABSTRACT

Patients with chronic pain have a higher prevalence of mood disorders with depression and anxiety contributing to higher pain intensity, emotional allodynia, and neuro-anatomical changes. We sought to quantify the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities (PCs) in a tertiary referral clinic for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Medical records of all patients attending clinics run by three tertiary temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgeons for the period January to April 2022 inclusive were audited for the prevalence of concomitant psychiatric conditions. A total of 166 patients were identified with a female to male ratio of 5:1 and mean (SD) age of 45.1 (15.2) years. A total of 124 (89.9%) patients were tertiary referrals and 72 (43.4%) patients had concomitant psychiatric diagnoses, with 58 (34.9%) being on some form of psychotropic medication (PM) (patients on anticonvulsants for neuropathic pain were not included). A majority of 136 (81.9%) patients had some form of intervention (including Dysport® and minimally invasive surgery) which appeared more common in patients with co-existing psychiatric issues (p < 0.05). A higher proportion of mental health issues exist among TMD patients in a tertiary referral clinic than would be expected in the general population. We suggest a holistic approach to patients with multidisciplinary care taking into account this prevalence to ensure decision-making that contextualises the patient and not simply the pathology.


Subject(s)
Comorbidity , Mental Disorders , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Tertiary Care Centers , Humans , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/complications , Adult , Prevalence , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
13.
Int. j. morphol ; 42(1): 1-8, feb. 2024. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1528813

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Temporomandibular joint dysfunction interferes with the quality of life and activities of daily living among patients. The symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction, including pain and clicking and popping sounds, are worsened during stressful events, and patients report increased pain around the temporomandibular joint. Stress-related behaviors, such as teeth clenching and teeth grinding, are commonly reported as increasing during stress. The prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction and stress-related behaviors is reported differently in the literature. Stress in higher education is common. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and stress-related behaviors among staff members at a local University. The study also sought to explore pain patterns described by people experiencing temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the relationship between stress-related behaviors and pain symptoms experienced. Further, the impact of stress on symptoms experienced by people with temporomandibular dysfunction was investigated in this pilot study.


La disfunción de la articulación temporomandibular interfiere con la calidad de vida y las actividades de la vida diaria entre los pacientes. Los síntomas de la disfunción temporomandibular, incluidos el dolor y los chasquidos, empeoran durante los eventos estresantes, y los pacientes informan un aumento del dolor alrededor de la articulación temporomandibular. Los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés, como apretar y rechinar los dientes, suelen aumentar durante el estrés. La prevalencia de la disfunción temporomandibular y los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés se informa de manera diferente en la literatura. El estrés en la educación superior es común. El propósito de este estudio piloto fue investigar la prevalencia de la disfunción de la articulación temporomandibular y los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés entre los miembros del personal de una universidad local. El objetivo del estudio además fue explorar los patrones de dolor descritos por personas que experimentan disfunción de la articulación temporomandibular y la relación entre los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés y los síntomas de dolor experimentados. Además, en este estudio piloto se investigó el impacto del estrés en los síntomas que experimentan las personas con disfunción temporomandibular.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Pain/psychology , Pain/epidemiology , Universities , Pilot Projects , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0297944, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38359009

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in subjects with skeletal class II dentofacial deformity referred for orthognathic surgery, as well as to elucidate its association with sociodemographic and psychosocial features. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. The sample comprised class II skeletal patients referred to an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery center in the Brazilian Northeast. RESULTS: Seventy-three subjects were enrolled and completed the data collection, which consisted of a physical examination according to Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and facial analysis. Women represented 82.2% of the sample. Among the assessed subjects, 68.5% were already undergoing orthodontic treatment, and the mean overjet of patients was 6.97 mm. The prevalence of TMD in this sample was 46.6%, with muscular disorders being the most common. Patients with an anteroposterior discrepancy greater than 7 mm showed a higher occurrence of TMD (p = 0.017). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated a high prevalence of TMD in skeletal class II patients referred for orthognathic surgery, especially in those with a pronounced overjet, being Group I (muscular disorders) and Group III (degenerative disorders) the most prevalent.


Subject(s)
Orthognathic Surgery , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Brazil/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint
15.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(5): 817-826, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38205584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As one of the most important indicators of socioeconomic status, educational attainment (EA) exhibits a strong association with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Despite this link, there is a lack of evidence regarding the causal role of EA in either facilitating or preventing TMDs. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the causal effect of education on TMDs and explore potential mediating pathways. METHODS: Utilizing summary statistics from genome-wide association studies on years of schooling (N = 766 345) and TMDs (N = 211 023), we conducted Mendelian randomization (MR) to assess the overall effect of education. Additionally, a two-step MR approach was employed to evaluate 30 potential mediators and calculate the mediation proportions in the association. Comprehensive sensitivity analyses were used to verify the robustness, heterogeneity, and pleiotropy. RESULTS: Univariable MR analyses revealed a causal effect of lower EA on an increased risk of TMDs (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.43-0.66, p < .001). Five out of 30 modifiable factors were identified as causal mediators in the associations of EA with TMDs, including feeling nervous (mediation proportion: 11.6%), feeling tense (10.2%), depression (9.6%), feeling worry (7.6%) and daily smoking (8.9%). Meanwhile, no pleiotropy was detected in the analyses (p > .05). CONCLUSION: Our findings supported that higher EA has a protective effect on the onset of TMDs, with partial mediation by psychological disorders and daily smoking. Interventions on these factors thus have the potential of substantially reducing the burden of TMDs attributed to low education.


Subject(s)
Genome-Wide Association Study , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Educational Status , Emotions , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
16.
J Occup Health ; 66(1)2024 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38258933

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between recovery experience, job demands, psychological distress, and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Japanese workers. METHODS: It used cross-sectional data from the fourth survey of a multi-wave longitudinal project, conducted using the registered monitors of an internet research company. Finally, 1278 respondents' data were analyzed (655 males, 623 females; mean [SD] age = 41.63 [10.31] years). We utilized Sugiaski's TMD screening question to assess TMD prevalence, Brief Job Stress Questionnaire to assess job demands, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) to assess psychological distress, and the Japanese version of the Recovery Experience Questionnaire to assess recovery experiences. The moderated mediation analysis was conducted using the Process macro program for SPSS developed by Preacher and Hayes, examining the effect of job demands on TMD through psychological distress, moderated by the recovery experience. RESULTS: The results showed that 13.1% (n = 168) of the respondents had TMD. Mediation analysis indicated high job demands were associated with an increased TMD prevalence through psychological distress. The moderated mediation analysis revealed that relaxation and control moderated the relationship between job demands and psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional study established the relationship between job demands, psychological distress, and TMD among Japanese workers. The findings suggest that increased job demands contribute to high TMD prevalence through the mediation of psychological distress, moderated by relaxation and control.


Subject(s)
Occupational Stress , Psychological Distress , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Female , Male , Humans , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Internet , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology
17.
PLoS One ; 19(1): e0296329, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38165877

ABSTRACT

This study employs machine learning analysis with population data for the associations of preterm birth (PTB) with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and gastrointestinal diseases. The source of the population-based retrospective cohort was Korea National Health Insurance claims for 489,893 primiparous women with delivery at the age of 25-40 in 2017. The dependent variable was PTB in 2017. Twenty-one predictors were included, i.e., demographic, socioeconomic, disease and medication information during 2002-2016. Random forest variable importance was derived for finding important predictors of PTB and evaluating its associations with the predictors including TMD and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Shapley Additive Explanation (SHAP) values were calculated to analyze the directions of these associations. The random forest with oversampling registered a much higher area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve compared to logistic regression with oversampling, i.e., 79.3% vs. 53.1%. According to random forest variable importance values and rankings, PTB has strong associations with low socioeconomic status, GERD, age, infertility, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, TMD, salivary gland disease, hypertension, tricyclic antidepressant and benzodiazepine. In terms of max SHAP values, these associations were positive, e.g., low socioeconomic status (0.29), age (0.21), GERD (0.27) and TMD (0.23). The inclusion of low socioeconomic status, age, GERD or TMD into the random forest will increase the probability of PTB by 0.29, 0.21, 0.27 or 0.23. A cutting-edge approach of explainable artificial intelligence highlights the strong associations of preterm birth with temporomandibular disorder, gastrointestinal diseases and antidepressant medication. Close surveillance is needed for pregnant women regarding these multiple risks at the same time.


Subject(s)
Gastroesophageal Reflux , Premature Birth , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Pregnancy , Female , Infant, Newborn , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Artificial Intelligence , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Gastroesophageal Reflux/complications , Gastroesophageal Reflux/drug therapy , Gastroesophageal Reflux/epidemiology , Machine Learning
18.
J Affect Disord ; 349: 486-493, 2024 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38199395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a series of musculoskeletal diseases with high prevalence. A few studies have reported the correlation between TMD and suicide ideation (SI). However, the underlying mechanism of the relationship lacks in-depth exploration. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 954 pre-orthodontic patients. TMD assessment was based on the quintessential five TMD symptoms (5Ts) questionnaire. Anxiety, depression and pain catastrophizing was evaluated by Seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), Nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), respectively. Correlational and moderated mediated analysis was preformed to demonstrate the relationship between TMD and SI. RESULTS: In pre-orthodontic patients, 31.87 % reported having TMD symptoms and 6.50 % declared SI during the past two weeks. The SI prevalence was 10.53 % in participants with TMD and 4.62 % in those without TMD. Intra-articular TMD, rather than pain-related TMD were especially related with SI. Individuals with TMD had higher risk to SI (rs = 0.112, adjusted OR = 2.213, p < 0.001). The effect of TMD on SI was fully mediated through depression (ß = 0.445, 95 % CI = [0.326, 0.563]). Anxiety exerted a negative moderating effect on the depression-SI relation (ß = -0.033, 95 % CI = [-0.047, -0.019]). LIMITATIONS: This study was a single-centered and cross-sectional survey. The data collection relied on self-reporting methods. CONCLUSIONS: A positive link between TMD and SI was disclosed. The effect of TMD on SI was fully mediated through depression with anxiety as a negative moderator.


Subject(s)
Depression , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Pain
19.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 137, 2024 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38281907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Herbst appliance is an excellent therapy for treating class II malocclusions with increased overjet. Its mechanics involve propelling the mandibular bone using two pistons the patient cannot remove. The so-called bite-jumping keeps the mandible in a more anterior position for a variable period, usually at least 6 months. This appliance does not inhibit joint functions and movements, although there are scientific papers in the literature investigating whether this appliance can lead to temporomandibular disorders. This systematic review aims to evaluate whether Herbst's device can cause temporomandibular diseases by assessing the presence of TMD in patients before and after treatment. METHODS: A literature search up to 3 May 2023 was carried out on three online databases: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. Only studies that evaluated patients with Helkimo scores and Manual functional analysis were considered, as studies that assessed the difference in TMD before and after Herbst therapy. Review Manager version 5.2.8 (Cochrane Collaboration) was used for the pooled analysis. We measured the odds ratio (OR) between the two groups (pre and post-Herbst). RESULTS: The included papers in this review were 60. Fifty-seven were excluded. In addition, a manual search was performed. After the search phase, four articles were considered in the study, one of which was found through a manual search. The overall effect showed that there was no difference in TMD prevalence between pre-Herbst and post-Herbst therapy (OR 0.74; 95% CI: 0.33-1.68). CONCLUSION: Herbst appliance seems not to lead to an increase in the incidence of TMD in treated patients; on the contrary, it appears to decrease it. Further studies are needed to assess the possible influence of Herbst on TMDs.


Subject(s)
Malocclusion, Angle Class II , Orthodontic Appliances, Functional , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Prevalence , Cephalometry , Malocclusion, Angle Class II/therapy , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy
20.
JDR Clin Trans Res ; 9(2): 170-179, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37114677

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The largest epidemiologic study conducted about painful temporomandibular disorders (pTMDs) to date identified 3 clusters of individuals with similar symptoms-adaptive, pain sensitive, and global symptoms-which hold promise as a means of personalizing pain care. Our goal was to compare the clinical and psychological characteristics that are consistent with a pTMD clinical examination among patients who are seeking care and assigned to the different clusters. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used data from the medical records of patients attending Duke Innovative Pain Therapies between August 2017 and April 2021 who received a pTMD diagnosis (i.e., myalgia) and consented to have their data used for research. Data included orofacial and pain-related measures, dental features, and psychological measures. We used the Rapid OPPERA Algorithm to assign clusters to patients and multinomial regression to determine the likelihood (odds ratios [OR] and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of being assigned to the pain sensitive or global symptoms cluster attributed to each measure. RESULTS: In total, 131 patients were included in this study and assigned a cluster: adaptive (n = 54, 41.2%), pain sensitive (n = 49, 37.4%), and global symptoms (n = 28, 21.4%). The PS cluster displayed greater numbers of temporomandibular joint sites (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.65) and masticatory (1.48; 1.19 to 1.83) and cervical (1.23; 1.09 to 1.39) muscles with pain evoked by palpation. The GS cluster displayed greater scores of pain catastrophizing (1.04; 1.01 to 1.06) and perceived stress (1.23; 1.03 to 1.46) and was more likely to report persistent pain (16.23; 1.92 to 137.1) of higher impact (1.43; 1.14 to 1.80). CONCLUSION: Our findings support that care-seeking patients with pTMDs who are assigned to the GS cluster display a poorer psychological profile, even though those assigned to the PS cluster display more measures consistent with orofacial pain. Findings also establish the PS cluster as a group that does not display psychological comorbidities despite being hypersensitive. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER STATEMENT: This study informs clinicians that patients seeking care for painful temporomandibular disorders, in specific cases of myalgia, can be classified into 1 of 3 groups that display unique profiles of symptoms. Most importantly, it emphasizes the importance of examining patients with painful temporomandibular disorders in a holistic manner that includes assessing symptoms of psychological distress. Patients with greater psychological distress will likely benefit from multidisciplinary treatment strategies that may include psychological treatments.


Subject(s)
Myalgia , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Facial Pain/diagnosis , Facial Pain/epidemiology , Facial Pain/etiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint
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