Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 781
Filter
1.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(6): 334, 2024 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722345

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe the characteristics of and the associations between health-related quality of life, pain, craniomandibular function, and psychosocial factors related to pain and fear of movement in patients with head and neck cancer. METHODS: Seventy-eight patients diagnosed with HNC were recruited. Measurements of the maximum mouth opening range and pressure pain thresholds on the masseter muscle and the distal phalanx of the thumb were conducted, as well as a battery of self-report questionnaires were administrated, including the QoL Questionnaire (EORT QLQ-H&N35), Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Spanish translation of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia for Temporomandibular Disorders (TSK-TMD), and the short version of the Craniofacial Pain and Disability Inventory (CF-PDI-11). RESULTS: The study sample (66.7% men, mean age 60.12 [11.95] years) experienced a moderate impact on their QoL levels (57.68 [18.25] EORT QLQ-H&N35) and high kinesiophobia values (20.49 [9.11] TSK-TMD). Pain was present in 41% of the patients, but only 3.8% reported severe pain. 26.4% had a restricted mouth opening range, and 34.62% showed significant catastrophism levels. There were strong positive correlations between EORT QLQ-H&N35 and CF-PDI-11 (r = 0.81), between NRS and CF-PDI-11 (r = 0.74), and between PCS and CF-PDI-11 (r = 0.66). CONCLUSION: Patients with HNC experience negative effects in their QoL, related to their impairment in craniomandibular function. Fear of movement, pain intensity, and catastrophism are associated with poorer functionality; relationships that should be considered when attempting to improve health care.


Subject(s)
Head and Neck Neoplasms , Quality of Life , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Head and Neck Neoplasms/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/complications , Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pain Measurement , Movement , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Fear/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cancer Pain/psychology , Adult , Pain Threshold/psychology
2.
Clin Oral Investig ; 28(6): 302, 2024 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38714576

ABSTRACT

Investigating the collective impact of psychometric properties and sleep quality on pain sensitivity in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients could improve clinical management strategies. OBJECTIVE: Assessing whether combined psychometric properties and sleep quality impact painful mechanical sensitivity and pain modulation in TMD patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study using secondary data analysis of 77 TMD patients and 101 controls. All participants completed questionnaires characterizing their psychometric profile (anxiety, depression, stress and catastrophizing) and sleep quality, alongside psychophysical tests for painful mechanical sensory (mechanical pain threshold (MPT), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and wind-up ratio (WUR)) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Participants were grouped into "High distress" or "Low distress" categories based on psychometric properties and sleep quality using hierarchical cluster and k-means analyses. Multiple linear regression evaluated the influence of TMD, age, and the distress cluster on MPT, WUR, PPT, and CPM in masseter and thenar muscles. Differences were statistically significant when p < 0.05. RESULTS: The presence of TMD was the strongest predictor of mechanical painful sensitivity in the trigeminal region (MPT[F(3,174) = 51.902;p < .001;R2 = .463]; TMD presence (ß = -.682) / PPT[F(3,174) = 15.573;p < .001;R2 = .198] TMD presence (ß = -.452), and extra-trigeminal (MPT[F(3,174) = 35.897;p < .001;R2 = .382] TMD (ß = -.647) / CPM [F(3,174) = 4.106;p < .05;R2 = .050] TMD presence (ß = .197). Furthermore, neither the high distress group nor the low distress group were able to significantly influence the variation of the values of any of the psychophysical variables evaluated (p > .05). CONCLUSIONS: There is not a significant influence of impairment clusters based on psychological variables and sleep quality on painful mechanical sensitivity and pain modulation, regardless of the presence of TMD. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This outcome suggests that psychosocial factors and sleep quality may not play a decisive role in the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, particularly concerning painful TMD.


Subject(s)
Pain Measurement , Pain Threshold , Psychometrics , Sleep Quality , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pain Threshold/physiology , Adult , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Facial Pain/physiopathology , Facial Pain/psychology
3.
Clin Oral Investig ; 28(5): 273, 2024 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38664277

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the associations of orofacial two-point discrimination (2-PD) test result with pain symptoms and psychological factors in patients with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). METHODS: 193 patients with TMDs were included in this study. Patients' demographics, pain intensity, and psychological status were recorded. The 2-PDs in the bilateral temporal, zygomatic, mandibular, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) regions of the patients were measured. Statistical analyses were conducted to observe the associations between variables. RESULTS: For Pain-related TMDs (PT) patients, Monthly Visual Analogue Scale (VAS-M) and Current Analogue Scale (VAS-C) were correlated with TMJ, zygomatic and temporal 2-PDs. Patients with PT tended to have higher TMJ 2-PDs[Right: ß = 1.827 mm, 95%CI(0.107, 3.548), P = 0.038], zygomatic 2-PDs[Right: ß = 1.696 mm, 95%CI(0.344, 3.048), P = 0.014], temporal 2-PDs[Left: ß = 2.138 mm, 95%CI(0.127, 4.149), P = 0.037; Right: ß = 1.893 mm, 95%CI(0.011, 3.775), P = 0.049]. Associations were also observed between VAS-C and TMJ 2-PDs[Left: ß = 0.780, 95%CI(0.190, 1.370), P = 0.01; Right: ß = 0.885, 95%CI(0.406, 1.364), P = 0.001], Zygomatic 2-PDs[Right: ß = 0.555, 95%CI(0.172, 0.938), P = 0.005]; VAS-M and TMJ 2-PDs[Left: ß = 0.812, 95%CI(0.313, 1.311), P = 0.002; Right: ß = 0.567, 95%CI(0.152, 0.983), P = 0.008], zygomatic 2-PDs[Left: ß = 0.405, 95%CI(0.075, 0.735), P = 0.016; Right: ß = 0.545, 95%CI(0.221, 0.870), P = 0.001], and temporal 2-PDs [Left: ß = 0.741, 95%CI(0.258, 1.224), P = 0.003; Right: ß = 0.519, 95%CI(0.063, 0.975), P = 0.026]. CONCLUSION: TMJ, zygomatic, and temporal 2-PDs were significantly associated with PT and pain intensity. Age, gender and psychological factors were not associated with orofacial 2-PDs. PT patients exhibited weaker tactile acuity compared to Non-PT patients. Further discussion on the underlying mechanism is needed. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Orofacial tactile acuity of TMDs patients was associated with their pain symptoms, which researchers should take account into when performing 2-PD tests for TMDs patients. The 2-PD test can be considered as a potential tool along with the current procedures for the differentiations of PT and Non-PT.


Subject(s)
Facial Pain , Pain Measurement , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Female , Male , Adult , Facial Pain/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Pain Threshold/physiology
4.
BMC Prim Care ; 25(1): 137, 2024 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38671353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) are a variety of conditions that affect different parts of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) and can cause orofacial pain and functional impairment. This study aims to investigate dental practitioners' knowledge and management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMDs), particularly their knowledge of the role physical therapy plays in TMD treatment. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach was adopted to provide a comprehensive view of current knowledge, management practices, and attitudes toward collaboration among dental practitioners in treating TMD. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 335 dentists in Karachi using a detailed questionnaire to assess their knowledge of the role of physical therapy in the treatment of TMD. Twenty dentists were chosen for face-to-face, in-depth interviews to explore their experiences and challenges in managing TMDs based on their responses to the administered questionnaire. RESULTS: The cumulative quantitative and qualitative findings of the study revealed a landscape marked by individualized approaches to referral practices and significant gaps in interdisciplinary collaboration. Most practitioners holding a bachelor's degree predominantly used medication (65.2%) and cause-specific treatment (65.3%) for TMD treatment. Thematic analysis of clinical efficacy and practitioner challenges in managing TMD revealed significant issues faced by dental professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The study successfully validated a questionnaire to understand dental practitioners' knowledge regarding physical therapy in TMD treatment. The study identified significant gaps in knowledge and a lack of collaboration between dentists and physiotherapists. The limited referral practices highlighted in the study, along with insights from dentist interviews, emphasize the need for improved interdisciplinary approaches to managing TMDs within dental practice.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Dentists/psychology , Male , Female , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Physical Therapy Modalities , Referral and Consultation , Practice Patterns, Dentists' , Middle Aged
5.
Head Face Med ; 20(1): 26, 2024 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38659050

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aims to analyze to what extent patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are affected by temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and its impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). To collect data, an online questionnaire was created to recruit participants from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland through social media and support groups. The questionnaire consists of free-text questions, the German versions of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-G14), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS), and the Graded Chronic Pain Status (GCPS). RESULTS: A total of 76 participants with diagnosed MFS were included. Of these, 65.8% showed TMD symptoms, the most common being pain or stiffness of the masticatory muscles in the jaw angle (50.0%). Only 14.5% of the participants were already diagnosed with TMD. Of the participants with an increased likelihood of a depression disorder, 76.9% showed TMD symptoms. Of those with a critical score for an anxiety disorder, 90.9% showed TMD symptoms. 73.3% of participants with TMD symptoms reached the critical score for a stress disorder. TMD symptoms were associated with a higher risk for chronic pain. In the median, participants with TMD showed statistically notably higher OHIP-G14 scores than participants without TMD (11.5 [IQR 17] vs. 1 [IQR 3] points, p ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSION: TMD symptoms had a noticeable impact on OHRQoL in patients with MFS, i.e., chronic pain and psychological impairment. TMD seems underdiagnosed, and more research is needed to prevent the associated chronification of pain and psychological burden to improve the OHRQoL.


Subject(s)
Marfan Syndrome , Quality of Life , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Marfan Syndrome/complications , Marfan Syndrome/psychology , Marfan Syndrome/physiopathology , Female , Male , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/etiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Adult , Germany/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Switzerland/epidemiology , Austria/epidemiology , Young Adult , Oral Health
6.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(6): 1025-1033, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38475974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Longitudinal intervention studies on treatment options in temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) including self reports and salivary biomarkers of stress are rare and the exact therapeutic function of occlusal splints widely unknown. METHODS: We examined the therapeutic effects of a Michigan splint with occlusal relevance in patients with TMD using a placebo-controlled, delayed-start design. Two intervention groups received a Michigan splint, while one of them had a placebo palatine splint for the first 3 weeks. We collected pain intensities (at rest and after five occlusal movements), salivary measures associated with stress (cortisol and alpha-amylase) and self-reported psychological distress (stress, anxiety, catastrophizing) at baseline and 3 and 7 weeks after onset of intervention. RESULTS: At baseline, we observed increased pain intensity and psychological distress in TMD patients compared to 11 matched healthy controls. Baseline anxiety was linked to movement pain intensity through stress. Over therapy reductions in pain intensity and morning cortisol were more pronounced in those patients starting immediately with the Michigan splint, while psychological distress decreased similarly in both groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that perceived stress plays a role for the association between anxiety and TMD pain and underlines the need for an interdisciplinary perspective on the pathogenesis and therapy of TMD in a setting where psychotherapeutic knowledge is still scarce or rarely applied.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers , Hydrocortisone , Occlusal Splints , Pain Measurement , Saliva , Stress, Psychological , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Female , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/metabolism , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Adult , Male , Saliva/chemistry , Saliva/metabolism , Biomarkers/analysis , Biomarkers/metabolism , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Stress, Psychological/metabolism , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Treatment Outcome , Facial Pain/therapy , Facial Pain/psychology , Facial Pain/physiopathology , Facial Pain/metabolism , Middle Aged , Young Adult , alpha-Amylases/metabolism , alpha-Amylases/analysis
7.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38480071

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The comorbidities between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and somatization and their associations with personality traits, emotional disorders, and sleep disturbances were investigated. STUDY DESIGN: Adults aged 18 to 24 years completed an electronic survey encompassing TMD symptoms (5Ts), Patient Health Questionnaire-15, Big Five Personality Inventory-10, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data were assessed using non-parametric tests/correlation analysis and logistic regression analysis (α = 0.05). RESULTS: The sample comprised 365 participants, of whom 22.2% and 19.5% were 5Ts-negative without and with somatization, respectively, and 18.1% and 40.3% were 5Ts-positive without and with somatization, respectively. Significant differences in neuroticism, distress, depression, anxiety, stress, and sleep quality were observed between 5Ts-negative participants with somatization and 5Ts-positive participants with somatization compared with 5Ts-negative participants without somatization and 5Ts-positive participants without somatization. Distress, anxiety, stress, and sleep were moderately correlated with somatic but not TMD symptoms (rs = 0.45-0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of whether they had TMDs, participants with somatization exhibited heightened levels of neuroticism and emotional and sleep disturbances.


Subject(s)
Comorbidity , Sleep Wake Disorders , Somatoform Disorders , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Male , Somatoform Disorders/epidemiology , Somatoform Disorders/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Adolescent , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult , Personality Inventory , Personality , Patient Health Questionnaire
8.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(6): 1034-1040, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38486491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Limitation of mouth opening, widely known as trismus, is a major symptom altering quality of life in individuals presenting from temporomandibular joint disorder or head and neck cancer. A French-language instrument addressing jaw opening limitation following treatment for head and neck cancer (HNC) or temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is lacking. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to translate and validate the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire-2 (GTQ-2) into French. METHODS: A French translation of the GTQ-2 was performed according to established international guidelines, leading to the French-GTQ-2 (F-GTQ-2). The validation study included 154 participants with trismus (minimum interincisal opening of ≤35 mm) following treatment for TMD or HNC and 149 age-matched participants without trismus. All participants completed the F-GTQ-2 and participants with trismus completed additional health-related quality of life questionnaires to allow for analysis of convergent validity. RESULTS: The F-GTQ-2 demonstrated retained psychometric properties with Cronbach's alpha values above 0.70 for the domains, jaw-related problems, eating limitations, facial pain and somewhat lower for muscular tension (0.60). Mainly moderate correlations were found when comparing the F-GTQ-2 to other instruments, which was in line with the pre-specified hypotheses, indicating satisfactory convergent validity. Discriminant validity was found with statistically significant differences in all domains of the F-GTQ-2 between trismus and non-trismus participants. CONCLUSION: The F-GTQ-2 can be considered a reliable and valid instrument to assess jaw-related difficulties in individuals with trismus due to HNC or TMD.


Subject(s)
Head and Neck Neoplasms , Psychometrics , Quality of Life , Translations , Trismus , Humans , Trismus/physiopathology , Female , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Adult , Head and Neck Neoplasms/complications , Head and Neck Neoplasms/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Aged , France , Facial Pain/physiopathology
9.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 299, 2024 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38431574

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex joint that facilitates mandibular movements during speech, chewing, and swallowing activities. The Axis I evaluation of the DC/TMD focuses on assessing physical diagnoses related to TMDs. It includes an assessment of pain and functional limitations, such as jaw opening range, joint sounds, and joint tenderness. The Axis II evaluation of the DC/TMD provides information on the patient's psychological status and quality of life. This Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis aimed to evaluate the accuracy of Temporomandibular Disorders diagnosis considered through the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorder (DC/TDM) axis II compared to the Axis I evaluations. METHODS: A search was made in PubMed, Web of Science and Lilacs for articles published from the inception until 20 January 2023. We applied the Population, Exposure, Comparator, and Outcomes (PECO) model [1] to assess document eligibility. Only studies that evaluated patients by DC/TMD Axis I and Axis II were considered. Review Manager version 5.2.8 (Cochrane Collaboration) was used for the pooled analysis. We measured the odds ratio (OR) between the two groups (Axis I and Axis II). RESULTS: Fifty-one articles were selected because of the search. Four papers were excluded before the screening: 2 pieces were not in English, and two were reviewed. The remaining 47 articles were selected for the title and abstract screening to evaluate whether they met the PECO criteria. Among these, four papers were established; the overall effect showed that there was no difference in TMD diagnosis between Axis I and Axis II (RR 1.17; 95% CI: 0.80- 1.71; Z:0.82; P = .41), suggesting that there is no difference between Axis I and Axis II. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, DC/TMD is an effective tool for the diagnosis of TMD. It improves the accuracy of TMD diagnosis, allows for the classification of subtypes, and assesses psychosocial factors that may impact the development or maintenance of TMD symptoms.


Subject(s)
Facial Pain , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Facial Pain/etiology , Quality of Life , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint , Mandible
10.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(6): 982-991, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38414127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Large horizontal maxillary overjet (overjet) is associated with reduced bite force (BF) and number of contacts, which influence the chewing effectivity (CE). Oral health, oro-facial function (OF) and malocclusion have great impact on psychological well-being and quality of life (QoL). OBJECTIVES: The aims of the study were to examine OF, temporomandibular disorders (TMD), BF, CE, QoL and well-being in children and adolescents with large overjet. METHODS: The study was a case-control study including healthy children with large overjet in the study group compared to a control group of healthy children with neutral occlusion, all 9-14 years old. OF was examined by use of Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S), Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) and registration of morphological and functional occlusion. QoL and well-being were examined using KIDSCREEN-10 and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. RESULTS: The study and control groups included 37 and 32 participants, respectively. Significantly increased NOT-S score (p < .001) and reduced BF (p = .011), numbers of contacts (p < .001) and CE (p = .005) were found in the study group. BF, numbers of contacts and CE were negatively associated with erupting canines and premolars. No significant difference was found in age, gender, dental eruption, TMD diagnosis or QoL between the groups. Significantly increased emotional symptoms (p = .007), hyperactivity (p = .043) and total difficulties score (p = .009) were found in the study group. CONCLUSION: The study group showed higher NOT-S score and reduced BF, number of contacts and CE. No difference in QoL were found between the groups, although reduced well-being and increased emotional symptoms, hyperactivity and total difficulties were found in the study group.


Subject(s)
Bite Force , Overbite , Quality of Life , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Female , Child , Male , Case-Control Studies , Adolescent , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Overbite/physiopathology , Mastication/physiology , Oral Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , Malocclusion/physiopathology , Malocclusion/psychology , Maxilla/physiopathology
11.
Int. j. morphol ; 42(1): 1-8, feb. 2024. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1528813

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Temporomandibular joint dysfunction interferes with the quality of life and activities of daily living among patients. The symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction, including pain and clicking and popping sounds, are worsened during stressful events, and patients report increased pain around the temporomandibular joint. Stress-related behaviors, such as teeth clenching and teeth grinding, are commonly reported as increasing during stress. The prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction and stress-related behaviors is reported differently in the literature. Stress in higher education is common. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and stress-related behaviors among staff members at a local University. The study also sought to explore pain patterns described by people experiencing temporomandibular joint dysfunction and the relationship between stress-related behaviors and pain symptoms experienced. Further, the impact of stress on symptoms experienced by people with temporomandibular dysfunction was investigated in this pilot study.


La disfunción de la articulación temporomandibular interfiere con la calidad de vida y las actividades de la vida diaria entre los pacientes. Los síntomas de la disfunción temporomandibular, incluidos el dolor y los chasquidos, empeoran durante los eventos estresantes, y los pacientes informan un aumento del dolor alrededor de la articulación temporomandibular. Los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés, como apretar y rechinar los dientes, suelen aumentar durante el estrés. La prevalencia de la disfunción temporomandibular y los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés se informa de manera diferente en la literatura. El estrés en la educación superior es común. El propósito de este estudio piloto fue investigar la prevalencia de la disfunción de la articulación temporomandibular y los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés entre los miembros del personal de una universidad local. El objetivo del estudio además fue explorar los patrones de dolor descritos por personas que experimentan disfunción de la articulación temporomandibular y la relación entre los comportamientos relacionados con el estrés y los síntomas de dolor experimentados. Además, en este estudio piloto se investigó el impacto del estrés en los síntomas que experimentan las personas con disfunción temporomandibular.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Pain/psychology , Pain/epidemiology , Universities , Pilot Projects , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
JDR Clin Trans Res ; 9(2): 170-179, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37114677

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The largest epidemiologic study conducted about painful temporomandibular disorders (pTMDs) to date identified 3 clusters of individuals with similar symptoms-adaptive, pain sensitive, and global symptoms-which hold promise as a means of personalizing pain care. Our goal was to compare the clinical and psychological characteristics that are consistent with a pTMD clinical examination among patients who are seeking care and assigned to the different clusters. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used data from the medical records of patients attending Duke Innovative Pain Therapies between August 2017 and April 2021 who received a pTMD diagnosis (i.e., myalgia) and consented to have their data used for research. Data included orofacial and pain-related measures, dental features, and psychological measures. We used the Rapid OPPERA Algorithm to assign clusters to patients and multinomial regression to determine the likelihood (odds ratios [OR] and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of being assigned to the pain sensitive or global symptoms cluster attributed to each measure. RESULTS: In total, 131 patients were included in this study and assigned a cluster: adaptive (n = 54, 41.2%), pain sensitive (n = 49, 37.4%), and global symptoms (n = 28, 21.4%). The PS cluster displayed greater numbers of temporomandibular joint sites (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.65) and masticatory (1.48; 1.19 to 1.83) and cervical (1.23; 1.09 to 1.39) muscles with pain evoked by palpation. The GS cluster displayed greater scores of pain catastrophizing (1.04; 1.01 to 1.06) and perceived stress (1.23; 1.03 to 1.46) and was more likely to report persistent pain (16.23; 1.92 to 137.1) of higher impact (1.43; 1.14 to 1.80). CONCLUSION: Our findings support that care-seeking patients with pTMDs who are assigned to the GS cluster display a poorer psychological profile, even though those assigned to the PS cluster display more measures consistent with orofacial pain. Findings also establish the PS cluster as a group that does not display psychological comorbidities despite being hypersensitive. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER STATEMENT: This study informs clinicians that patients seeking care for painful temporomandibular disorders, in specific cases of myalgia, can be classified into 1 of 3 groups that display unique profiles of symptoms. Most importantly, it emphasizes the importance of examining patients with painful temporomandibular disorders in a holistic manner that includes assessing symptoms of psychological distress. Patients with greater psychological distress will likely benefit from multidisciplinary treatment strategies that may include psychological treatments.


Subject(s)
Myalgia , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Facial Pain/diagnosis , Facial Pain/epidemiology , Facial Pain/etiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/epidemiology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint
13.
Braz Oral Res ; 37: e070, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37436293

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the association of pain-related disability with biopsychosocial factors in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. The study was carried out at the Orofacial Pain Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Feira de Santana, Bahia, from September 2018 to March 2020. The sociodemographic aspects, TMD subtypes, presence of pain-induced disability, pressure pain threshold, perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing were evaluated in 61 patients. The studied variables were compared between patients with and without pain-induced disability. Crude and adjusted logistic regression were performed to obtain estimates of odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. With the exception of catastrophizing, there was no association between the biopsychosocial factors and pain-induced disability. The presence of catastrophizing increased the chance of having chronic pain-induced disability by 4.02 times. The results of this study indicate a strong association between pain catastrophizing and disability in individuals with chronic painful TMD.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Anxiety , Pain Measurement/methods , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology
14.
Clin Oral Investig ; 27(8): 4459-4470, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37243820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study proposed a conceptual framework for reporting Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) Axis I conditions and investigated the prevalence of TMD subtypes/categories in patients from Confucian heritage cultures. Variances in gender, age, and TMD chronicity between Chinese (CN) and Korean (KR) patients were also explored. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subjects were recruited from consecutive patients seeking care at two University-based centers in Beijing and Seoul. Eligible patients completed a demographic survey as well as the DC/TMD Symptom Questionnaire and were clinically examined according to the DC/TMD methodology. Axis I diagnoses were subsequently rendered with the DC/TMD algorithms and documented using the stratified reporting framework. Statistical evaluations were performed with chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests, and logistic regression analysis (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Data of 2008 TMD patients (mean age 34.8 ± 16.2 years) were appraised. Substantial differences in female-to-male ratio (CN > KR), age (KR > CN), and TMD duration (KR > CN) were observed. Ranked frequencies of the most common Axis I diagnoses were: CN - disc displacements (69.7%) > arthralgia (39.9%) > degenerative joint disease (36.7%); KR - disc displacements (81.0%) > myalgia (60.2%) > arthralgia (56.1%). Concerning TMD categories, notable differences in the prevalence of intra-articular (CN 55.1% > KR 15.4%) and combined (KR 71.8% > CN 33.4%) TMDs were discerned. CONCLUSIONS: Though culturally similar, the two countries require disparate TMD care planning/prioritization. While TMJ disorders in children/adolescents and young adults should be emphasized in China, the focus in Korea would be on TMD pain in young and middle-aged adults. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Besides culture, other variables including socioeconomic, environmental, and psychosocial factors can influence the clinical presentation of TMDs. Chinese and Korean TMD patients exhibited significantly more intra-articular and combined TMDs respectively.


Subject(s)
Facial Pain , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , Child , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Facial Pain/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Arthralgia/diagnosis , Myalgia
15.
J Oral Rehabil ; 50(11): 1167-1180, 2023 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37144484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for use in adults is in use worldwide. Until now, no version of this instrument for use in adolescents has been proposed. OBJECTIVE: To present comprehensive and short-form adaptations of the adult version of DC/TMD that are appropriate for use with adolescents in clinical and research settings. METHODS: International experts in TMDs and experts in pain psychology participated in a Delphi process to identify ways of adapting the DC/TMD protocol for physical and psychosocial assessment of adolescents. RESULTS: The proposed adaptation defines adolescence as ages 10-19 years. Changes in the physical diagnosis (Axis I) include (i) adapting the language of the Demographics and the Symptom Questionnaires to be developmentally appropriate for adolescents, (ii) adding two general health questionnaires, one for the adolescent patient and one for their caregivers and (iii) replacing the TMD Pain Screener with the 3Q/TMD questionnaire. Changes in the psychosocial assessment (Axis II) include (i) adapting the language of the Graded Chronic Pain Scale to be developmentally appropriate for adolescents, (ii) adding anxiety and depression assessment that have been validated for adolescents and (iii) adding three constructs (stress, catastrophizing and sleep disorders) to assess psychosocial functioning in adolescents. CONCLUSION: The recommended DC/TMD, including Axis I and Axis II for adolescents, is appropriate to use in clinical and research settings. This adapted first version for adolescents includes changes in Axis I and Axis II requiring reliability and validity testing in international settings. Official translations of the comprehensive and short-form to different languages according to INfORM requirements will enable a worldwide dissemination and implementation.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Adult , Adolescent , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Pain Measurement/methods , Language , Facial Pain/diagnosis
16.
J Oral Rehabil ; 50(8): 706-714, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37078711

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The management of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) requires a comprehensive approach that considers multiple factors, including the impact of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Through this investigation we aim to assess the impact of OHRQoL played in a TMD-afflicted individual. METHODS: Using keywords relevant to our research, such as "Oral health related quality of life," "Oral hygiene," "Temporomandibular joint" and "Temporomandibular disorders," a comprehensive search across multiple online databases was carried out, yielding a total of 632 studies at the preliminary stage of the review. Modified New Castle Ottawa scale was used to assess the quality of studies included. RESULTS: Eight studies were included in the review, out of which six were eligible for further meta-analysis. The studies included in this review employed various OHRQoL measures, including the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and the OHIP- 49. All the studies demonstrated significant effect of TMDs on the OHRQoL of the target population under study. CONCLUSION: The impact of OHRQoL on the management of TMD was deemed to be significant. The comprehensive management of TMD should consider the impact of the condition on the individual's daily life and incorporate interventions that address both the physical and psychological aspects of the condition. By improving OqL, individuals with TMD can experience improved overall well-being and quality of life.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , Oral Health , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint , Oral Hygiene , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
J Indian Prosthodont Soc ; 23(2): 163-169, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37102542

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to determine the association of stress and salivary cortisol levels in the adult Indian population with and without temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and to validate it with bite force. Settings and Design: The present study had an observational, case-control study design. Materials and Methods: This study sample comprised two groups of 25 cases and 25 controls between 18 and 45 years of age. Diagnostic criteria-TMD questionnaire Axis I was used to assess TMD classification, the TMD Disability Index and modified Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) questionnaires were filled, and salivary cortisol levels were measured using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). Bite force analysis was performed using a portable load indicator. Statistical Analysis Used: To characterize and analyze the study variables, means, standard deviations, Mann-Whitney U-test, and logistic regression were employed (STATA 14.2 [Texas, USA]). Shapiro-Wilk test was used to test the normality of the data. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant (95% power). Results: Female gender was proportionately higher in both the groups (P = 0.508), TMD Disability Index was significantly higher for cases (P < 0.001), TMD cases perceived higher stress levels (P = 0.011), there was no statistically significant difference in salivary cortisol level between cases and controls (P = 0.648), and the median bite force was lower for cases (P = 0.0007). Conclusions: This study concluded that the chance of developing TMD increased with age. An increase in the TMD Disability Index score and modified PSS scores; and a decrease in the bite force increased the likelihood of TMD. Modified PSS score was negatively correlated with salivary cortisol concentrations, indicating a two-way response to TMD symptoms.


Subject(s)
Hydrocortisone , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Adult , Humans , Female , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Case-Control Studies , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Biomarkers/analysis , Stress, Physiological/physiology
18.
Medwave ; 23(1): e2648, 2023 Feb 23.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36883888

ABSTRACT

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are complex multi-system disorders for which common traditional dental-centric approaches to research and care unfortunately continue to prevail. A committee appointed by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NAM) of the United States of America summarized important recommendations regarding the urgent need to transform, from the predominantly biomedical model, the research, professional education/training, and patient care for TMDs into the biopsychosocial model that is standard in the rest of pain medicine. The release of the Consensus Study Report identifies eleven short-term and long-term recommendations regarding gaps and opportunities oriented towards the situation in the US, which are equally applicable to the situation in Chile. The first four recommendations focus on basic and translational research, public health research and strengthening clinical research. The next three recommendations concern risk assessment, diagnostics, and dissemination of clinical practice guidelines and care metrics to improve patient care and expand its access. Recommendations eight to ten propose Centers of Excellence for Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain Treatment, improving professional school education, and expanding specialized continuing education for healthcare providers. The eleventh recommendation focuses on patient education and stigma reduction. This article highlights the published recommendations and addresses what should be considered by Chilean professionals, as a first step of a major effort to shift TMD research, treatment, and education paradigms for the years to come.


Los trastornos temporomandibulares son complejos trastornos multisistémicos para los que, lamentablemente, siguen prevaleciendo los enfoques tradicionales odontocéntricos comunes de la investigación y la atención. Un comité designado por las Academias Nacionales de Ciencias, Ingeniería y Medicina de los Estados Unidos de América resumió importantes recomendaciones relativas a la urgente necesidad de transformar, desde el modelo predominantemente biomédico, la investigación, la educación/formación profesional y la atención al paciente para los trastornos temporomandibulares en el modelo biopsicosocial que es estándar en el resto de la medicina del dolor. La publicación del informe del estudio de consenso identifica once recomendaciones de corto y largo plazo respecto a brechas y oportunidades orientadas a la situación en Estados Unidos, que son igualmente aplicables a la situación en Chile. Las primeras cuatro recomendaciones se centran en la investigación básica y traslacional, la investigación en salud pública y el fortalecimiento de la investigación clínica. Las tres recomendaciones siguientes se refieren a la evaluación de riesgos, el diagnóstico y la difusión de guías de práctica clínica y métricas asistenciales para mejorar la atención de los pacientes y ampliar su acceso. Las recomendaciones octavas a décima proponen centros de excelencia para el tratamiento de los trastornos temporomandibulares y el dolor orofacial, la mejora de la formación en los centros profesionales y la ampliación de la formación continua especializada para los profesionales sanitarios. La undécima recomendación se centra en la educación de los pacientes y la reducción del estigma. Este artículo destaca las recomendaciones publicadas y aborda lo que debiesen considerar los profesionales chilenos, como primer paso hacia un gran esfuerzo por cambiar los paradigmas de investigación, tratamiento y educación sobre los trastornos temporomandibulares para los próximos años.


Subject(s)
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , United States , Chile , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Facial Pain/therapy , Pain Management
19.
J Oral Facial Pain Headache ; 37(1): 47-53, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36917236

ABSTRACT

Aims: To determine sleep quality and associated factors in a group of patients with painful TMDs. Methods: The medical records of 80 patients with arthralgia and/or myofascial pain were reviewed and compared to a healthy control group. Data about sex, age, subjective pain, physical activity, social activity, subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), pain vigilance (Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire [PVAQ]), and pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]) were collected. Relationships between PSQI, age, pain intensity, PVAQ, and PCS in the TMD group were also analyzed. Data from the control group were used to transform the PSQI results into T-scores, which were then used to divide the TMD group into two subgroups: normal and impaired sleep. Results: TMD patients presented a significantly higher (P < .001) PSQI score than the control group. Also, in the TMD group, there was a low to moderate correlation between PSQI and pain intensity and a significant correlation between PVAQ and PCS. The impaired sleep group presented a significantly higher (P < .001) PSQI T-score than the normal sleep group. Univariate analysis showed that subjective pain, social activity, and the PCS total and subscale scores differed significantly between the different PSQI T-score groups. The comparison between TMD pain patients and control subjects showed a significantly higher prevalence of T-score discordance in almost all PSQI components in TMD patients with impaired sleep. Conclusion: Subjective sleep quality in painful TMD patients could be associated with and influenced by psychosocial factors (catastrophizing and hypervigilance), social activity, and pain intensity.


Subject(s)
Sleep Wake Disorders , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Sleep Quality , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Pain/etiology , Anxiety , Surveys and Questionnaires , Catastrophization , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology
20.
J Oral Facial Pain Headache ; 37(1): 55-73, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36917237

ABSTRACT

Aims: To systematically review the qualitative evidence related to experiences of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and to explore their journeys within health care services. Methods: A systematic search of the following databases was conducted: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL Complete, and the Cochrane database. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze and synthesize the data from qualitative studies that explored the journeys of TMD patients within health care services. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool was used to critically appraise the quality of the included studies. Results: The search strategies yielded 4,563 articles across all databases, and 18 articles were eventually included. Six themes were derived: care-seeking attitudes; expectations and health care experience; the patient-clinician interaction; diagnosis as a stepping stone for improvement; management; and social support. Conclusion: The journey within health care services may play a valuable role in the ability to cope with chronic TMDs. Receiving a diagnosis, being listened to, and being believed are among the most important elements making for a positive clinical experience.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Health Services , Qualitative Research , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Humans , Social Support , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Chronic Disease , Physician-Patient Relations , Clinical Competence , Motivation
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...