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3.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38765516

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the association between clinical and imaging with surgical and pathological findings in patients with suspected neuroendocrine tumor of appendix and/or appendix endometriosis. Methods: Retrospective descriptive study conducted at the Teaching and Research Institute of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, in which medical records and databases of patients with suspected neuroendocrine tumor of appendix and/or endometriosis of appendix were analyzed by imaging. Results: Twenty-eight patients were included, all of which had some type of appendix alteration on the ultrasound examination. The pathological outcome of the appendix found 25 (89.3%) lesions compatible with endometriosis and three (10.7%) neuroendocrine tumors. The clinical findings of imaging and surgery were compared with the result of pathological anatomy by means of relative frequency. Conclusion: It was possible to observe a higher prevalence of appendix endometriosis when the patient presented more intense pain symptoms. The image observed on ultrasound obtained a high positive predictive value for appendicular endometriosis.


Subject(s)
Appendix , Endometriosis , Neuroendocrine Tumors , Ultrasonography , Humans , Female , Endometriosis/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , Adult , Neuroendocrine Tumors/diagnostic imaging , Appendix/diagnostic imaging , Appendix/pathology , Middle Aged , Diagnosis, Differential , Young Adult , Appendiceal Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Appendiceal Neoplasms/pathology , Cecal Diseases/diagnostic imaging
4.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38765514

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aims to correlate pelvic ultrasound with female puberty and evaluate the usual ultrasound parameters as diagnostic tests for the onset of puberty and, in particular, a less studied parameter: the Doppler evaluation of the uterine arteries. Methods: Cross-sectional study with girls aged from one to less than eighteen years old, with normal pubertal development, who underwent pelvic ultrasound examination from November 2020 to December 2021. The presence of thelarche was the clinical criterion to distinguish pubescent from non-pubescent girls. The sonographic parameters were evaluated using the ROC curve and the cutoff point defined through the Youden index (J). Results: 60 girls were included in the study. Uterine volume ≥ 2.45mL had a sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 90%, PPV of 90%, NPV of 93% and accuracy of 91% (AUC 0.972) for predicting the onset of puberty. Mean ovarian volume ≥ 1.48mL had a sensitivity of 96%, specificity of 90%, PPV of 90%, NPV of 97% and accuracy of 93% (AUC 0.966). Mean PI ≤ 2.75 had 100% sensitivity, 48% specificity, 62% PPV, 100% NPV and 72% accuracy (AUC 0.756) for predicting the onset of puberty. Conclusion: Pelvic ultrasound proved to be an excellent tool for female pubertal assessment and uterine and ovarian volume, the best ultrasound parameters for detecting the onset of puberty. The PI of the uterine arteries, in this study, although useful in the pubertal evaluation, showed lower accuracy in relation to the uterine and ovarian volume.


Subject(s)
Puberty , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Child , Puberty/physiology , Adolescent , Child, Preschool , Uterus/diagnostic imaging , Uterus/blood supply , Infant , Sensitivity and Specificity , Uterine Artery/diagnostic imaging , Ovary/diagnostic imaging , Ovary/blood supply , Pelvis/diagnostic imaging , Pelvis/blood supply , Ultrasonography , ROC Curve
6.
J Foot Ankle Res ; 17(2): e12014, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38773711

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is characterized by chronic pain in the anterior aspect of the knee during loading activities. Many studies investigating muscle morphology changes for individuals with PFP focus on the proximal joints, however, few studies have investigated muscles of the foot and ankle complex. This study aimed to explore the differences in peroneal muscle size and activation between individuals with PFP and healthy controls using ultrasound imaging in weight-bearing. METHODS: A case-control study in a university lab setting was conducted. Thirty individuals with PFP (age: 20.23 ± 3.30 years, mass: 74.70 ± 27.63 kgs, height: 161.32 ± 11.72 cm) and 30 healthy individuals (age: 20.33 ± 3.37 years, mass: 64.02 ± 11.00 kgs, height: 169.31 ± 9.30 cm) participated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) images of the peroneal muscles were taken in non-weight bearing and weight-bearing positions. The functional activation ratio from lying to single-leg standing (SLS) was calculated. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant (p = 0.041) group (PFP, healthy) by position (non-weight-bearing, weight-bearing) interaction for the peroneal muscle CSA with a Cohen's d effect size of 0.2 in non-weight-bearing position and 0.7 in weight-bearing position. The functional activation ratio for the healthy group was significantly more (p = 0.01) than the PFP group. CONCLUSION: Peroneal muscles were found to be smaller in size in those with PFP compared to the healthy subjects in the weight-bearing SLS position. This study found that those with PFP have lower activation of peroneal muscles in functional position.


Subject(s)
Muscle, Skeletal , Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome , Ultrasonography , Weight-Bearing , Humans , Weight-Bearing/physiology , Case-Control Studies , Male , Female , Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging , Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology , Muscle, Skeletal/pathology , Young Adult , Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome/physiopathology , Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome/pathology , Adult , Adolescent , Foot/physiopathology , Foot/diagnostic imaging , Foot/pathology , Posture/physiology
7.
Scand J Med Sci Sports ; 34(5): e14665, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38773808

ABSTRACT

The objective of the study was to obtain adjusted ultrasonographic reference values of the Achilles tendon thickness (maximum anterior-posterior distance) in adults without (previous) Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and to compare these reference values with AT patients. Six hundred participants were consecutively included, comprising 500 asymptomatic individuals and 100 patients with clinically diagnosed chronic AT. The maximum tendon thickness was assessed using Ultrasound Tissue Characterization. A multiple quantile regression model was developed, incorporating covariates (personal characteristics) that were found to have a significant impact on the maximum anterior-posterior distance of the Achilles tendon. A 95% reference interval (RI) was derived (50th, 2.5th-97.5th percentile). In asymptomatic participants median (95% RI) tendon thickness was 4.9 (3.8-6.9) mm for the midportion region and 3.7 (2.8-4.8) mm for the insertional region. Age, height, body mass index, and sex had a significant correlation with maximum tendon thickness. Median tendon thickness for the midportion region was calculated with the normative equation -2.1 + AGE × 0.021 + HEIGHT × 0.032+ BMI × 0.028 + SEX × 0.05. For the insertional region, the normative equation was -0.34 + AGE × 0.010+ HEIGHT × 0.018 + BMI × 0.022 + SEX × -0.05. In the equations, SEX is defined as 0 for males and 1 for females. Mean (95% CI) difference in tendon thickness compared to AT patients was 2.7 mm (2.3-3.2, p < 0.001) for the midportion and 1.4 mm (1.1-1.7, p < 0.001) for the insertional region. Compared to the asymptomatic population 73/100 (73%) AT patients exhibited increased tendon thickening, with values exceeding the 95% RI. This study presents novel reference values for the thickness of midportion and insertional region of the Achilles tendon, which were adjusted for personal characteristics. Our novel web-based openly accessible calculator for determining normative Achilles tendon thickness (www.achillestendontool.com) will be a useful resource in the diagnostic process. Trial registration number: This trial is registered in the Netherlands Trial Register (NL9010).


Subject(s)
Achilles Tendon , Tendinopathy , Ultrasonography , Humans , Achilles Tendon/diagnostic imaging , Achilles Tendon/anatomy & histology , Achilles Tendon/pathology , Male , Female , Tendinopathy/diagnostic imaging , Tendinopathy/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Middle Aged , Reference Values , Aged , Body Mass Index , Young Adult , Sex Factors
8.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 15: 21501319241255576, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38773821

ABSTRACT

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a valuable clinical tool used at the patient bedside to rapidly assess a wide variety of symptoms and problems which would otherwise take hours or even days. Though it has become the standard of care in Emergency Medicine and is becoming so in hospital internal medicine, less uptake has been appreciated in the outpatient setting despite reported interest from clinicians practicing there. A number of common barriers have been cited to explain this gap in use, which usually include access to equipment, mentorship, and time. In this review we present a proposed framework for clinicians who have an interest in implementing POCUS in their outpatient practice which we hope can mitigate some of these barriers and provide a more streamlined pathway to their desired goals.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Point-of-Care Systems , Ultrasonography , Humans , Ultrasonography/methods , Ambulatory Care/methods
9.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1385836, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38774231

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Ultrasound is instrumental in the early detection of thyroid nodules, which is crucial for appropriate management and favorable outcomes. However, there is a lack of clinical guidelines for the judicious use of thyroid ultrasonography in routine screening. Machine learning (ML) has been increasingly used on big data to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to leverage the ML approach in assessing the risk of thyroid nodules based on common clinical features. Methods: Data were sourced from a Chinese cohort undergoing routine physical examinations including thyroid ultrasonography between 2013 and 2023. Models were established to predict the 3-year risk of thyroid nodules based on patients' baseline characteristics and laboratory tests. Four ML algorithms, including logistic regression, random forest, extreme gradient boosting, and light gradient boosting machine, were trained and tested using fivefold cross-validation. The importance of each feature was measured by the permutation score. A nomogram was established to facilitate risk assessment in the clinical settings. Results: The final dataset comprised 4,386 eligible subjects. Thyroid nodules were detected in 54.8% (n=2,404) individuals within the 3-year observation period. All ML models significantly outperformed the baseline regression model, successfully predicting the occurrence of thyroid nodules in approximately two-thirds of individuals. Age, high-density lipoprotein, fasting blood glucose and creatinine levels exhibited the highest impact on the outcome in these models. The nomogram showed consistency and validity, providing greater net benefits for clinical decision-making than other strategies. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the viability of an ML-based approach in predicting the occurrence of thyroid nodules. The findings highlight the potential of ML models in identifying high-risk individuals for personalized screening, thereby guiding the judicious use of ultrasound in this context.


Subject(s)
Machine Learning , Thyroid Nodule , Ultrasonography , Thyroid Nodule/diagnostic imaging , Thyroid Nodule/pathology , Humans , Female , Ultrasonography/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Adult , Thyroid Gland/diagnostic imaging , Thyroid Gland/pathology , Risk Assessment/methods , Aged , Nomograms , China/epidemiology
10.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 70(5): e20231548, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38775510

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare endometrial thickness with the use of transdermal estrogen (gel) versus oral estrogen (pills) for endometrial preparation in the frozen embryo transfer cycle and serum estrogen concentrations during the preparation cycle, side effects, and chemical and clinical pregnancy rates. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of women undergoing endometrial preparation for cryopreserved blastocyst transfer. A total of 88 women were randomized, of which 82 completed the study protocol. Of this group, 44 received 6 mg/day of estradiol valerate orally (pills group) and 38 received 4.5 mg/day of estradiol hemihydrate transdermally (gel group). Endometrial thickness was measured using transvaginal ultrasound between the 7 and 10th day of the cycle. Serum estradiol concentrations were measured on the day of initiating the cycle, on control transvaginal ultrasounds, and on the day of embryo transfer. Side effects were documented at each study visit. p<0.05 were adopted as statistically significant. The groups were compared using Student's t-test for continuous variables and chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. RESULTS: There were no significant group differences (p>0.05) in endometrial thickness, biochemical and clinical pregnancy rates, miscarriage rate, blood estradiol concentrations, duration of estradiol administration, or cycle cancellation rates. CONCLUSION: Endometrial preparation with transdermal estrogen yielded similar reproductive outcomes to oral estrogen with fewer side effects.


Subject(s)
Administration, Cutaneous , Cryopreservation , Embryo Transfer , Endometrium , Estradiol , Pregnancy Rate , Humans , Female , Embryo Transfer/methods , Endometrium/drug effects , Endometrium/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Pregnancy , Estradiol/administration & dosage , Estradiol/blood , Administration, Oral , Prospective Studies , Cryopreservation/methods , Gels , Estrogens/administration & dosage , Ultrasonography
11.
J Tradit Chin Med ; 44(3): 629-632, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38767648

ABSTRACT

Acupuncture is a typical example of Traditional Chinese Medicine and has been used in China for hundreds of years to treat a wide range of illnesses. However, in the clinic, issues and deficiencies were primarily seen in four areas: loss of accuracy in the operation process; difficulty understanding the depth of acupuncture; difficulty using reinforcing and reducing techniques; and lack of a clear dynamic effect of acupuncture points following acupuncture. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography may quantitatively evaluate the acupuncture location and display the distribution of small nerves near and within the fascia of the acupuncture point in real time. The subjects were asked how they felt about receiving Qi when the needle body reached different depths and different tissues. The Qi obtained from an acupuncture point and the connective tissue of the fascia can be further understood by combining the physiological response of the acupuncture point with the anatomical structure, which offers a new method for defining the nature of the acupuncture point and standardizing the acupuncture point.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Acupuncture Therapy , Ultrasonography , Humans , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Ultrasonography/methods , Musculoskeletal System/diagnostic imaging
12.
Oral Oncol ; 153: 106823, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38701572

ABSTRACT

Resection margins of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are often inadequate. A systematic review on clinical intraoperative whole-specimen imaging techniques to obtain adequate deep resection margins in oral SCC is lacking. Such a review may render better alternatives for the current insufficient intraoperative techniques: palpation and frozen section analyses (FSA). This review resulted in ten publications investigating ultrasound (US), four investigating fluorescence, and three investigating MRI. Both US and fluorescence were able to image the tumor intraorally and perform ex-vivo imaging of the resection specimen. Fluorescence was also able to image residual tumor tissue in the wound bed. MRI could only be used on the ex-vivo specimen. The 95 % confidence intervals for sensitivity and specificity were large, due to the small sample sizes for all three techniques. The sensitivity and specificity of US for identifying < 5 mm margins ranged from 0 % to 100 % and 60 % to 100 %, respectively. For fluorescence, this ranged from 0 % to 100 % and 76 % to 100 %, respectively. For MRI, this ranged from 7 % to 100 % and 81 % to 100 %, respectively. US, MRI and fluorescence are the currently available imaging techniques that can potentially be used intraoperatively and which can image the entire tumor-free margin, although they have insufficient sensitivity for identifying < 5 mm margins. Further research on larger cohorts is needed to improve the sensitivity by determining cut-off points on imaging for inadequate margins. This improves the number of adequate resections of oral SCC's and pave the way for routine clinical implementation of these techniques.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Margins of Excision , Mouth Neoplasms , Humans , Mouth Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Mouth Neoplasms/surgery , Mouth Neoplasms/pathology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/surgery , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnostic imaging , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Ultrasonography/methods , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
J Emerg Med ; 66(5): e614-e618, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Left-sided intracardiac thrombi are most commonly seen in conditions with decreased cardiac flow, such as myocardial infarction or atrial fibrillation. They can be propagated into the systemic circulation, leading to a cerebrovascular accident. Identification of thrombus-in-transit via point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has the potential to change patient management given its association with high patient morbidity and mortality. CASE REPORT: An intubated 60-year-old man was transferred to our emergency department for management of altered mental status and seizure-like activity. The patient was markedly hypotensive on arrival, and cardiac POCUS was performed to identify potential causes of hypotension. A left ventricular thrombus-in-transit was identified. The thrombus was notably absent on a repeat POCUS examination < 10 min later, which led to concern for thrombus propagation. Furthermore, the patient's vasopressor requirements had significantly increased in that time period. Subsequent emergent neuroimaging revealed a large ischemic stroke in the left internal carotid and middle cerebral artery distribution. The patient was, unfortunately, deemed to not be a candidate for either thrombectomy or thrombolysis and ultimately expired in the hospital. Why Should an Emergency Physician Be Aware of This? Serial POCUS examinations identified the propagation of this patient's thrombus-in-transit, leading the physician to change the initial presumptive diagnosis and treatment course, and pursue further imaging and workup for ischemic stroke. Identification of a thrombus-in-transit is a clue to potentially underlying critical pathology and should be followed with serial POCUS examinations to assess for treatment efficacy and thrombus propagation.


Subject(s)
Point-of-Care Systems , Thrombosis , Ultrasonography , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/methods , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Heart Ventricles/physiopathology , Hypotension/etiology , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/complications , Fatal Outcome
14.
J Emerg Med ; 66(5): e642-e644, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy can be complicated by nonspecific laboratory and radiographic findings. The multiple alternative diagnoses must be weighed against each other based on the entire clinical presentation. CASE REPORT: We present a case of a 20-year-old woman who arrived to the Emergency Department (ED) with abdominal pain and ended up being transferred for an Obstetrics evaluation of a possible heterotopic pregnancy. Her radiology-performed ultrasound had revealed an "intrauterine gestational sac" along with an adnexal mass near the right ovary. The patient was not undergoing assisted-reproductive fertilization, nor did she have meaningful risk factors for heterotopic pregnancy. The patient was managed expectantly over the ensuing week to see whether the intrauterine fluid was a true gestational sac. After multiple repeat ED visits, the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made. Ultimately, the patient elected for surgical management of her ectopic pregnancy. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: This case offers a reminder of the subtleties of radiographic identification of intrauterine pregnancies and the ever-present need to "clinically correlate."


Subject(s)
Pregnancy, Ectopic , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Pregnancy, Ectopic/diagnosis , Young Adult , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Ultrasonography/methods , Gestational Sac/abnormalities , Delayed Diagnosis , Pregnancy, Heterotopic/diagnosis , Adult , Diagnosis, Differential , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration
15.
BMJ Case Rep ; 17(5)2024 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724214

ABSTRACT

This abstract describes a case of the growth of a serous borderline tumour recurrence and cyst to papillary projection ratio with associated ultrasound images. The aetiology, presentation and management of such cases are explored and compared to the literature.


Subject(s)
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Female , Ultrasonography , Ovarian Neoplasms/pathology , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Middle Aged
16.
Int J Nanomedicine ; 19: 4121-4136, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38736655

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aims to broaden the application of nano-contrast agents (NCAs) within the realm of the musculoskeletal system. It aims to introduce novel methods, strategies, and insights for the clinical management of ischemic muscle disorders, encompassing diagnosis, monitoring, evaluation, and therapeutic intervention. Methods: We developed a composite encapsulation technique employing O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMC) and liposome to encapsulate NCA-containing gold nanorods (GNRs) and perfluoropentane (PFP). This nanoscale contrast agent was thoroughly characterized for its basic physicochemical properties and performance. Its capabilities for in vivo and in vitro ultrasound imaging and photothermal imaging were authenticated, alongside a comprehensive biocompatibility assessment to ascertain its effects on microcirculatory perfusion in skeletal muscle using a murine model of hindlimb ischemia, and its potential to augment blood flow and facilitate recovery. Results: The engineered GNR@OCMC-liposome/PFP nanostructure exhibited an average size of 203.18±1.49 nm, characterized by size uniformity, regular morphology, and a good biocompatibility profile. In vitro assessments revealed NCA's potent photothermal response and its transformation into microbubbles (MBs) under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation, thereby enhancing ultrasonographic visibility. Animal studies demonstrated the nanostructure's efficacy in photothermal imaging at ischemic loci in mouse hindlimbs, where NIR irradiation induced rapid temperature increases and significantly increased blood circulation. Conclusion: The dual-modal ultrasound/photothermal NCA, encapsulating GNR and PFP within a composite shell-core architecture, was synthesized successfully. It demonstrated exceptional stability, biocompatibility, and phase transition efficiency. Importantly, it facilitates the encapsulation of PFP, enabling both enhanced ultrasound imaging and photothermal imaging following NIR light exposure. This advancement provides a critical step towards the integrated diagnosis and treatment of ischemic muscle diseases, signifying a pivotal development in nanomedicine for musculoskeletal therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Contrast Media , Gold , Ischemia , Muscle, Skeletal , Nanotubes , Ultrasonography , Animals , Gold/chemistry , Nanotubes/chemistry , Contrast Media/chemistry , Contrast Media/pharmacology , Mice , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/therapy , Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/methods , Hindlimb/blood supply , Fluorocarbons/chemistry , Fluorocarbons/pharmacology , Liposomes/chemistry , Chitosan/chemistry , Chitosan/pharmacology , Muscular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Muscular Diseases/therapy , Photothermal Therapy/methods , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Pentanes
17.
J Med Life ; 17(1): 116-122, 2024 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38737666

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound can identify important characteristics in primary hypothyroidism and diffuse hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). Therefore, sonologists are actively investigating ultrasound criteria to differentiate between these two conditions. Nevertheless, practice shows the absence of such ultrasonic landmarks. For the first time in the literature, three cases of primary hypothyroidism have demonstrated an ultrasound pattern identical to that of Graves' disease. This pattern includes the presence of goiter, marked total hypoechogenicity of the parenchyma, significantly or moderately increased blood flow intensity ('thyroid inferno'), and elevated peak systolic velocity of the superior thyroid arteries. These signs are less common in hypothyroidism compared to hyperthyroidism. Diagnostic data suggest that the pathogeneses of primary hypothyroidism and Graves' disease share the same mechanisms, leading to similar thyroid ultrasound patterns. One of these shared mechanisms is presumably thyroid overstimulation by the autonomic nervous system, which is adequate to the body's hormonal requirements in hypothyroidism but excessive in hyperthyroidism.


Subject(s)
Graves Disease , Hypothyroidism , Thyroid Gland , Ultrasonography , Humans , Graves Disease/diagnostic imaging , Graves Disease/complications , Hypothyroidism/diagnostic imaging , Hypothyroidism/complications , Ultrasonography/methods , Thyroid Gland/diagnostic imaging , Female , Middle Aged , Adult , Male
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 514, 2024 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38720299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ultrasound has widely used in various medical fields related to critical care. While online and offline ultrasound trainings are faced by certain challenges, remote ultrasound based on the 5G cloud platform has been gradually adopted in many clinics. However, no study has used the 5G remote ultrasound cloud platform operating system for standardized critical care ultrasound training. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of 5G-based remote interactive ultrasound training for standardized diagnosis and treatment in critical care settings. METHODS: A 5G-based remote interactive ultrasound training system was constructed, and the course was piloted among critical care physicians. From July 2022 to July 2023, 90 critical care physicians from multiple off-site locations were enrolled and randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The 45 physicians in the experimental group were trained using the 5G-based remote interactive ultrasound training system, while the other 45 in the control group were taught using theoretical online videos. The theoretical and practical ultrasonic capabilities of both groups were evaluated before and after the training sessions, and their levels of satisfaction with the training were assessed as well. RESULTS: The total assessment scores for all of the physicians were markedly higher following the training (80.7 ± 11.9) compared to before (42.1 ± 13.4) by a statistically significant margin (P < 0.001). Before participating in the training, the experimental group scored 42.2 ± 12.5 in the critical care ultrasound competency, and the control group scored 41.9 ± 14.3-indicating no significant differences in their assessment scores (P = 0.907). After participating in the training, the experimental group's assessment scores were 88.4 ± 6.7, which were significantly higher than those of the control group (72.9 ± 10.8; P < 0.001). The satisfaction score of the experimental group was 42.6 ± 2.3, which was also significantly higher than that of the control group (34.7 ± 3.1, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The 5G-based remote interactive ultrasound training system was well-received and effective for critical care. These findings warrant its further promotion and application.


Subject(s)
Critical Care , Feasibility Studies , Ultrasonography , Humans , Education, Distance , Clinical Competence , Male , Female , Adult
20.
J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil ; 37(3): 521-524, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728180

Subject(s)
Ultrasonography , Humans , Child
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