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1.
Blood ; 139(12): 1903-1907, 2022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35113987

ABSTRACT

Vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is triggered by vaccination against COVID-19 with adenovirus vector vaccines (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19; Ad26.COV2-S). In this observational study, we followed VITT patients for changes in their reactivity of platelet-activating antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies by an anti-PF4/heparin IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a functional test for PF4-dependent, platelet-activating antibodies, and new thrombotic complications. Sixty-five VITT patients (41 females; median, 51 years; range, 18-80 years) were followed for a median of 25 weeks (range, 3-36 weeks). In 48/65 patients (73.8%; CI, 62.0% to 83.0%) the functional assay became negative. The median time to negative functional test result was 15.5 weeks (range, 5-28 weeks). In parallel, EIA optical density (OD) values decreased from median 3.12 to 1.52 (P < .0001), but seroreversion to a negative result was seen in only 14 (21.5%) patients. Five (7.5%) patients showed persistent platelet-activating antibodies and high EIA ODs for >11 weeks. None of the 29 VITT patients who received a second vaccination dose with an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine developed new thromboses or relevant increase in anti-PF4/heparin IgG EIA OD, regardless of whether PF4-dependent platelet-activating antibodies were still present. PF4-dependent platelet-activating antibodies are transient in most patients with VITT. VITT patients can safely receive a second COVID-19 mRNA-vaccine shot.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Platelet Factor 4 , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Vaccines/adverse effects
3.
J. Health Biol. Sci. (Online) ; 10(1): 1-3, 01/jan./2022. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1358188

ABSTRACT

Na atualidade, fotografar ou gravar o instante da imunização contra a Covid-19 se tornou rotina compartilhada nas redes sociais. Essa exposição instigou a observação de uma questão relevante: a técnica de aplicação está correta? Com a veiculação de imagens, é possível visualizar as vacinas sendo administradas em diferentes áreas do músculo deltoide, o que pode acarretar efeitos adversos. A otimização da qualificação técnica e pedagógica dos profissionais que elaboram e ministram as capacitações, bem como o envolvimento efetivo dos vacinadores nos treinamentos para injeção intramuscular é uma necessidade constante para evitar mais danos à saúde da população


Currently, photographing or recording the instant of immunization against Covid-19 has become a shared routine on social networks. This exposition prompted the observation of a relevant question: is the application technique correct? With the transmission of images, it is possible to visualize the vaccines being administered in different areas of the deltoid muscle, which can cause adverse effects. The optimization of the technical and pedagogical qualification of the professionals who design and deliver the training, as well as the effective involvement of vaccinators in training for intramuscular injection, is a constant need to avoid further damage to the health of the population


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Immunization , Process Optimization , Deltoid Muscle , Injections
4.
Am J Epidemiol ; 191(4): 570-583, 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34999751

ABSTRACT

We estimated the trends and correlates of vaccine hesitancy and its association with subsequent vaccine uptake among 5,458 adults in the United States. Participants belonged to the Communities, Households, and SARS-CoV-2 Epidemiology COVID (CHASING COVID) Cohort, a national longitudinal study. Trends and correlates of vaccine hesitancy were examined longitudinally in 8 interview rounds from October 2020 to July 2021. We also estimated the association between willingness to vaccinate and subsequent vaccine uptake through July 2021. Vaccine delay and refusal decreased from 51% and 8% in October 2020 to 8% and 6% in July 2021, respectively. Compared with non-Hispanic (NH) White participants, NH Black and Hispanic participants had higher adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for both vaccine delay (for NH Black, aOR = 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 2.7), and for Hispanic, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0, 1.7)) and vaccine refusal (for NH Black, aOR = 2.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 3.6), and for Hispanic, 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0, 2.0)) in June 2021. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, compared with vaccine-willingness, was associated with lower odds of subsequent vaccine uptake (for vaccine delayers, aOR = 0.15, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.18; for vaccine refusers, aOR = 0.02; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.03 ), adjusted for sociodemographic factors and COVID-19 history. Vaccination awareness and distribution efforts should focus on vaccine delayers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
5.
Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) ; 70(5): 341-350, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35491190

ABSTRACT

Vaccines have contributed to the prevention of infectious diseases for a long time. Pathogen-derived antigens and adjuvants in vaccine formulations stimulate immune cells to elicit humoral and cellular immune responses against pathogens. Achieving highly immune responses with decreased adverse effects requires the development of a system that can deliver antigens to specific immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are well-known professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate acquired immune responses by presenting antigens to T cells. Accordingly, DC-targeted vaccines have been investigated and applied in clinical trials for the treatment of infectious diseases and for chronic diseases such as cancers. In addition to DCs, B lymphocytes are regarded as professional APCs despite their primary role in humoral immunity. Therefore, B cell-targeted vaccines are also expected to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. In this review we summarize the basic functions of DCs and B cells as APCs. We also provide information on DC and B cell targeted vaccines in preclinical and clinical settings. Finally, we introduce our novel antigen delivery system that targets splenic marginal zone B cells and the ability of this system to act as a novel vaccine that elicits both humoral and cellular immune responses.


Subject(s)
Antigens , Vaccines , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Dendritic Cells , Immunity, Cellular
6.
Aust J Gen Pract ; 51(5): 373-379, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35491464

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: General practitioners (GPs) are often the first source of vaccine information for expectant parents. A multicomponent intervention package (P3-MumBubVax) has been designed for midwives, but interventions to support GPs' vaccine discussions are limited. This qualitative study explored Australian GPs' attitudes, practices and educational needs to inform adaptation of the P3-MumBubVax intervention for primary care. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews with 30 GPs explored attitudes towards recommending maternal vaccines, vaccine communication approaches and training preferences. Data were analysed using thematic template analysis. RESULTS: Vaccination was central to the role of GPs and most felt confident discussing vaccines. GPs had opportunities to discuss maternal vaccines before and during pregnancy using a variety of communication techniques. GPs preferred convenient, interactive training with examples and up-to-date maternal vaccine resources. DISCUSSION: Findings informed adaptation of the P3-MumBubVax intervention, which offers GPs tailored vaccine resources, online communication training and interactive quizzes for individual or group learning.


Subject(s)
General Practitioners , Vaccines , Australia , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Vaccination
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 865759, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35493373

ABSTRACT

Background: A lack of knowledge on adult vaccination has been documented among physicians. They play a critical role in promoting adult vaccines. This study aimed to review the status of adult vaccination in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and evaluate physicians' knowledge and knowledge sources regarding adult vaccines. Methods: Local, regional, and global adult vaccination guidelines were reviewed. A 40-item questionnaire was used to collect data from physicians from June to October 2020, using convenience and snowball sampling. Knowledge score was calculated, and predictors identified using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H-tests. Ordinary Least Squares regression was used for Multivariate Analysis. Results: A total of 500 responses were included. A quarter were internists, and another quarter were family physicians. Fifty-seven percent were medical interns and residents. Both perceived and actual knowledge of adult vaccination were low. Bivariate analysis showed knowledge depending on department, level of training, workplace, and perceived knowledge. All remained significant after multivariable regression except workplace. International and local guidelines were the most common knowledge sources. Forty-two percent were unable to access the local guidelines. Conclusions: Physicians' knowledge was poor and local guidelines were not clear or easily accessible. Participants were highly receptive to guidance and practice with adult vaccines.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Vaccines , Adult , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates , Vaccination
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 829176, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35493393

ABSTRACT

Background: As the epidemic progresses, universal vaccination against COVID-19 has been the trend, but there are still some doubts about the efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccines in adolescents, children, and even infants. Purpose: To evaluate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines in the population aged 0-17 years. Method: A comprehensive search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from inception to November 9, 2021. All data were pooled by RevMan 5.3 statistical software, with risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval as the effect measure. This study protocol was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42021290205). Results: There was a total of six randomized controlled trials included in this systematic review and meta-analysis, enrolling participants in the age range of 3-17 years, and containing three types of COVID-19 vaccines. Compared with mRNA vaccines and adenovirus vector vaccines, inactivated vaccines have a more satisfactory safety profile, both after initial (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04-1.90, P = 0.03) and booster (RR 1.84, 95% CI 1.20-2.81, P = 0.005) vaccination. The risk of adverse reactions was significantly increased after the first and second doses, but there was no significant difference between the first two doses (RR 1.00, 95%CI 0.99-1.02, P = 0.60). Nevertheless, the two-dose regimen is obviously superior to the single-dose schedule for immunogenicity and efficacy. After booster vaccination, both neutralizing antibodies (RR 144.80, 95%CI 44.97-466.24, P < 0.00001) and RBD-binding antibodies (RR 101.50, 95%CI 6.44-1,600.76, P = 0.001) reach optimal levels, but the cellular immune response seemed not to be further enhanced. In addition, compared with younger children, older children and adolescents were at significantly increased risk of adverse reactions after vaccination, with either mRNA or inactivated vaccines, accompanied by a stronger immune response. Conclusion: The available evidence suggests that the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines are acceptable in people aged 3-17 years. However, there is an urgent need for additional multicenter, large-sample studies, especially in younger children under 3 years of age and even in infants, with long-term follow-up data. Systematic Review Registration: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42021290205, identifier: CRD42021290205.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Vaccination
9.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(643): eabf3685, 2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507671

ABSTRACT

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the major cause of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several human cancers and, more recently, multiple sclerosis. Despite its prevalence and health impact, there are currently no vaccines or treatments. Four viral glycoproteins (gp), gp350 and gH/gL/gp42, mediate entry into the major sites of viral replication, B cells, and epithelial cells. Here, we designed a nanoparticle vaccine displaying these proteins and showed that it elicits potent neutralizing antibodies that protect against infection in vivo. We designed single-chain gH/gL and gH/gL/gp42 proteins that were each fused to bacterial ferritin to form a self-assembling nanoparticle. Structural analysis revealed that single-chain gH/gL and gH/gL/gp42 adopted a similar conformation to the wild-type proteins, and the protein spikes were observed by electron microscopy. Single-chain gH/gL or gH/gL/gp42 nanoparticle vaccines were constructed to ensure product homogeneity needed for clinical development. These vaccines elicited neutralizing antibodies in mice, ferrets, and nonhuman primates that inhibited EBV entry into both B cells and epithelial cells. When mixed with a previously reported gp350 nanoparticle vaccine, gp350D123, no immune competition was observed. To confirm its efficacy in vivo, humanized mice were challenged with EBV after passive transfer of IgG from mice vaccinated with control, gH/gL/gp42+gp350D123, or gH/gL+gp350D123 nanoparticles. Although all control animals were infected, only one mouse in each vaccine group that received immune IgG had detectable transient viremia. Furthermore, no EBV lymphomas were detected in immune animals. This bivalent EBV nanoparticle vaccine represents a promising candidate to prevent EBV infection and EBV-related malignancies in humans.


Subject(s)
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections , Vaccines , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/prevention & control , Ferrets , Herpesvirus 4, Human , Immunoglobulin G , Mice , Vaccines, Combined
10.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(780): 890-893, 2022 May 04.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35510280

ABSTRACT

While no vaccine is on the horizon to prevent traveler's diarrhea, progress has been made in the field of malaria and dengue fever. In both cases, the objective is not primarily the prevention among travelers but rather the reduction of morbidity and mortality in populations living in endemic areas. The immune mechanisms protecting against parasitosis are not well understood, which further complicates vaccine development. The fact that veterinary vaccines against the parasites causing cysticercosis and echinococcosis are available for animals, justifies a certain optimism that vaccines against parasitosis will also be available for humans in the future. We report on recent developments in dengue, malaria, schistosomiasis, and hookworm vaccines.


Si aucun vaccin ne pointe à l'horizon pour prévenir la diarrhée des voyageurs, des progrès ont été faits dans le domaine de la malaria et de la dengue. Dans les deux cas, l'objectif n'est pas prioritairement la prévention chez les voyageurs mais plutôt la diminution de la morbidité et mortalité dans les populations vivant en zone d'endémie. Les mécanismes immunitaires protégeant contre les parasitoses ne sont pas bien connus, ce qui complique encore le développement vaccinal. Le fait que des vaccins vétérinaires contre les parasites causant la cysticercose et l'échinococcose soient disponibles pour les animaux justifie un certain optimisme de voir à l'avenir aussi chez l'humain des vaccins contre des parasitoses. Nous faisons le point sur les développements récents des vaccins contre la dengue, la malaria, la schistosomiase et l'ankylostomiase.


Subject(s)
Malaria , Vaccines , Diarrhea , Humans , Malaria/prevention & control , Travel , Vaccines/therapeutic use
11.
J Laryngol Otol ; 136(5): 466-468, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35510490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In a bid to end the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, many countries, including the UK, have rolled out mass immunisation programmes. While considered generally safe and effective, vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 have been reported to be associated with rare and potentially adverse reactions and side effects. CASE REPORT: This paper reports an unusual case of a patient who developed a unilateral vocal fold paralysis shortly after receiving the first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccine. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of vocal fold paralysis following administration of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. The authors support the position that currently approved coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines remain safe and effective; however, further surveillance and vigilance using real-world data are highly encouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Paralysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Vocal Cords
12.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(5): 315-328, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35521037

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate equity in the allocation and distribution of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to countries and territories participating in the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access (COVAX) Facility. Methods: We used publicly available data on the numbers of COVAX vaccine doses allocated and distributed to 88 countries and territories qualifying for COVAX-sponsored vaccine doses and 60 countries self-financing their vaccine doses facilitated by COVAX. We conducted a benefit-incident analysis to examine the allocation and distribution of vaccines based on countries' gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. We plotted cumulative country-level per capita allocation and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines from COVAX against the ranked per capita GDP of the countries and territories to generate a measure of the equity of COVAX benefits. Findings: By 23 January 2022 the COVAX Facility had allocated a total of 1 678 517 990 COVID-19 vaccine doses, of which 1 028 291 430 (61%) doses were distributed to 148 countries and territories. Taking account of COVAX subsidies, we found that countries and territories with low per capita GDP benefited more than higher-income countries in the numbers of vaccines. The benefits increased further when the analysis was adjusted by population age group (aged 65 years and older). Conclusion: The COVAX Facility is helping to balance global inequities in the allocation and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. However, COVAX alone has not been enough to reverse the inequality of total COVID-19 vaccine distribution. Future studies could examine the equity of all COVID-19 vaccine allocation and distribution beyond the COVAX-facilitated vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Global Health , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0266003, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507554

ABSTRACT

Why do people prefer one particular COVID-19 vaccine over another? We conducted a pre-registered conjoint experiment (n = 5,432) in France, Germany, and Sweden in which respondents rated the favorability of and chose between pairs of hypothetical COVID-19 vaccines. Differences in effectiveness and the prevalence of side-effects had the largest effects on vaccine preferences. Factors with smaller effects include country of origin (respondents are less favorable to vaccines of Chinese and Russian origin), and vaccine technology (respondents exhibited a small preference for hypothetical mRNA vaccines). The general public also exhibits sensitivity to additional factors (e.g. how expensive the vaccines are). Our data show that vaccine attributes are more important for vaccine preferences among those with higher vaccine favorability and higher risk tolerance. In our conjoint design, vaccine attributes-including effectiveness and side-effect prevalence-appear to have more muted effects among the most vaccine hesitant respondents. The prevalence of side-effects, effectiveness, country of origin and vaccine technology (e.g., mRNA vaccines) determine vaccine acceptance, but they matter little among the vaccine hesitant. Vaccine hesitant people do not find a vaccine more attractive even if it has the most favorable attributes. While the communication of vaccine attributes is important, it is unlikely to convince those who are most vaccine hesitant to get vaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Germany , Humans , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines/adverse effects
14.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0267214, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507562

ABSTRACT

Since its identification in 2019, Covid-19 has spread to become a global pandemic. Until now, vaccination in its different forms proves to be the most effective measure to control the outbreak and lower the burden of the disease on healthcare systems. This arena has become a prime target to criminal networks that spread counterfeit Covid-19 vaccines across the supply chain mainly for profit. Counterfeit vaccines provide false sense of security to individuals, heightens the risk of exposure and outbreak of the virus, and increase the risk of harm linked to Covid-19 infection. Moreover, the increase in counterfeit vaccines feeds hesitancy towards vaccination and erodes the trust in mass immunisation programmes. It is therefore of paramount importance to work on rapid and reliable methods for vaccine authentication. Subsequently this work utilised a portable and non-destructive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic method for authentication of Covid-19 vaccines. A total of 405 Covid-19 vaccines samples, alongside their main constituents, were measured as received through glass vials. Spectral quality and bands were inspected by considering the raw spectra of the vaccines. Authentication was explored by applying principal component analysis (PCA) to the multiplicative scatter correction-first derivative spectra. The results showed that NIR spectra of the vaccine featured mainly bands corresponding to the mRNA active ingredient. Fewer bands corresponded to the excipients and protein spectra. The vaccines NIR spectra were strongly absorbing with maximum absorbances up to 2.7 absorbance units and that differentiated them from samples containing normal saline only (constituent reported for counterfeit Covid-19 vaccines). Clustering based on PCA offered optimal authentication of Covid-19 vaccines when applied over the range of 9000-4000 cm-1These findings shed light on the potential of using NIR for analysing Covid-19 vaccines and presents a rapid and effective initial technique for Covid-19 vaccine authentication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , RNA, Messenger , Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared/methods
16.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 114, 2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35509077

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat) infections are frequently associated with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results were reported with a two-dose (0-2 months) schedule of an investigational AS01E-adjuvanted NTHi-Mcat vaccine containing three surface proteins from NTHi and one from Mcat. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of three NTHi-Mcat vaccine doses administered in two different schedules to adults with a smoking history (≥ 10 pack-years), immunologically representing the COPD population. METHODS: In this 18-month, randomised (1:1), observer-blind study with 6-month open follow-up, 200 healthy adults aged 40-80 years received NTHi-Mcat vaccine at 0-2-6 months and placebo at 12 months (0-2-6 group), or vaccine at 0-2-12 months and placebo at 6 months (0-2-12 group). Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded for 7 and 30 days, respectively, post-vaccination, and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) and serious AEs (SAEs) throughout the study. Immune responses were assessed. RESULTS: No safety concerns were identified with the third vaccine dose or overall. Most solicited AEs were mild/moderate. Unsolicited AEs were reported in 16%, 16.1% and 14.4% of participants in the 0-2-6 group post-dose 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and 20%, 20.4% and 9.7%, respectively, in the 0-2-12 group. In 24 months, SAEs were reported in 12 participants in the 0-2-6 group and 9 in the 0-2-12 group (18 events in each group). There were three deaths (unknown cause, 0-2-6 group; myocardial infarction, lung cancer in 0-2-12 group). pIMDs were reported in three participants in the 0-2-6 group (non-serious inflammatory bowel disease, gout, psoriasis) and three in the 0-2-12 group (serious ulcerative colitis, two with non-serious gout). The SAEs, deaths and pIMDs were considered not causally related to vaccination. Antigen-specific antibody concentrations were higher at 12 months post-dose 1 with the 0-2-6 schedule than with the 0-2-12 schedule and at 12 months post-dose 3 were similar between schedules, remaining higher than baseline. CONCLUSIONS: No safety concerns were identified when the investigational NTHi-Mcat vaccine was administered via a 0-2-6 months or 0-2-12 months schedule to older adults with a smoking history. Persistent immune responses were observed after the third vaccine dose. Trial registration https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ; NCT03443427, registered February 23, 2018.


Subject(s)
Gout , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Vaccines , Aged , Haemophilus influenzae , Humans , Moraxella catarrhalis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/prevention & control
17.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2022-05-04. (PAHO/FPL/IM/21-0043).
in English | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-55954

ABSTRACT

This factsheet provides important information related to frequently asked questions on the following rotavirus vaccines: RotaSIIL (Serum Institute of India) and RotaVac (Bharat Biotech).


Subject(s)
Immunization , Rotavirus , Vaccines
18.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 142(7)2022 05 03.
Article in Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35510454

Subject(s)
Malaria , Vaccines , Humans
19.
20.
BMJ ; 377: o1148, 2022 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35523434
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