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1.
J Sports Med Phys Fitness ; 61(10): 1333-1338, 2021 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34652086

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is to compare a 16-week tai chi and Iyengar yoga program effects on muscle strength, static and dynamic balance, and balance confidence in elderly people. METHODS: A total of 48 participants (≥60 years old) without mobility-impairing neurological disease, dementia, cardiovascular disease/symptoms during moderate exercise, poorly controlled hypertension, or balance-impairing drug use. Participants were divided into a tai chi group, an Iyengar yoga group, and a control group (eight males and eight females per group), using a restricted randomization scheme generated by software. While the former two undertook 16-week exercise programs, the control group received general education. Maximum concentric strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. The one-legged stand with eyes closed, "8 feet up and go," and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale were used to assess static balance, dynamic balance, and balance confidence in daily activities, respectively. RESULTS: Both programs improved all measures significantly with tai chi being more effective for increasing knee flexor strength (P=0.045) and extensor strength (P=0.032) and ABC score (P=0.034); Iyengar yoga was more effective for improving static balance (P=0.014) and dynamic balance (P=0.025; all P values here vs. the other program). CONCLUSIONS: Tai chi and Iyengar yoga can improve strength, balance, and balance confidence among older people. Both are suitable exercise choices for older adults.

2.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34659434

RESUMEN

Background: Hypertension has been a global public health problem. Qigong as a complementary and alternative therapy is often used to reduce blood pressure. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of Qigong on blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Methods: Six electronic resource databases were searched from inception to January 2019, and randomized controlled trials of Qigong on hypertension were retrieved. Meta-analysis was conducted according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration, and Review Manager 5.3 was applied. Two researchers independently identified articles to include based on inclusion/exclusion criteria, data extraction, and quality evaluation. Results: Fourteen studies, with 829 individuals, were included. The meta-analysis demonstrates that, compared with no exercise, Qigong has significant positive effects on systolic blood pressure (mean difference = -8.90, 95% CI (-12.13, -5.67), P < 0.00001) and diastolic blood pressure (mean difference = -5.02, 95% CI (-7.88, -2.17), P < 0.00001). There is, however, no significant difference between Qigong and other aerobic exercises in reducing blood pressure. Conclusion: Qigong can effectively reduce blood pressure levels. Longer-term engagement in the practice has an even better effect in hypertension patients. However, the conclusion of this study still needs to be verified by more high-quality studies.

3.
Res Sports Med ; 29(6): 586-592, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34477036

RESUMEN

This study examined the biomechanics of the lower limbs during four typical Tai Chi (TC) movements: wave hand in cloud, leaning fly side, repulse monkey, and brush knee and twist step, in order to provide biomechanical evidence-based recommendations for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) practicing TC. Joint angles and joint moments of the hip, knee, and ankle in frontal and sagittal plane as well as ground reaction forces were examined while performing TC and regular walking in an experienced 38 years old TC master. The results showed that relative to walking, the four TC movements are characterized by a wide motion range of lower limbs, slow increase in joint loading, and strong muscle activity during performance. Therefore, these TC movements could be suitable for patients with knee OA to practice for improving the muscle strength of their lower limbs and functional ability.


Asunto(s)
Extremidad Inferior/fisiología , Osteoartritis de la Rodilla/fisiopatología , Osteoartritis de la Rodilla/rehabilitación , Rango del Movimiento Articular/fisiología , Tai Ji/métodos , Caminata/fisiología , Soporte de Peso/fisiología , Adulto , Fenómenos Biomecánicos , Humanos , Cinética , Masculino
4.
Trials ; 22(1): 614, 2021 Sep 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34517878

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of death worldwide. China faces a similar risk of stroke as developed countries because of considerable changes in lifestyle, such as overeating and smoking. Tai Chi is a traditional form of mind-body exercise that has been widely practiced in China for thousands of years. However, there are few studies on the effect of Tai Chi on the cardiopulmonary function of stroke patients in the recovery phase. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of Tai Chi on the cardiorespiratory fitness of patients after stroke. METHODS: This is a parallel-design, two-arm, analyst assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. A total of 226 stroke patients in the recovery phase will be recruited and assigned randomly to a control group or Tai Chi group at a 1:1 ratio. The patients in the Tai Chi group will perform the Tai Chi exercise. The patients in the control group will perform walking exercises. Patients in both groups will receive conventional treatments and healthy education. The primary outcomes will be VO2peak and scores on the MOS item short form health survey (SF-36) scale. Secondary outcomes will include vital capacity (VC), ejection fractions (EF), and cardiac output (CO). The assessments of the tests will be performed at three time points (before exercise, at the end of exercise, and 6 weeks after exercise). Adverse events will be recorded faithfully during the study. DISCUSSION: If the results are positive, this study will contribute to the establishment of further guided Tai Chi rehabilitation programs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR2000034719 . Registered on 16 July 2020.


Asunto(s)
Accidente Cerebrovascular , Tai Ji , Ejercicio Físico , Terapia por Ejercicio , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Accidente Cerebrovascular/diagnóstico , Accidente Cerebrovascular/terapia , Resultado del Tratamiento , Caminata
5.
Motor Control ; : 1-15, 2021 Sep 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34530402

RESUMEN

The team developed the newly compiled eight methods and five steps of Tai Chi (EMFSTC), which includes introductory routines to Tai Chi characterized by simple structures. This study examined the effectiveness of EMFSTC practice on balance control. A total of 31 participants were randomly assigned to EMFSTC (n = 15, age = 66.4 ± 1.7 years, received 16-week EMFSTC practice) or control (n = 16, age = 66.7 ± 1.8 years, received no practice) groups. Significant group by training interactions were observed. After EMFSTC practice, balance control improved, as indicated by decreased root mean square and mean velocity of center of pressure, proprioception threshold during knee extension, and plantar tactile sensitivity threshold at the arch. EMFSCT can be an effective rehabilitation modality to improve balance control among older adults.

6.
Cancer Med ; 2021 Sep 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34533284

RESUMEN

To manage acute, long-term, and late effects of cancer, current guidelines recommend moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic and resistance exercise. Unfortunately, not all cancer survivors are able or willing to perform higher intensity exercise during difficult cancer treatments or because of other existing health conditions. Tai Chi is an equipment-free, multicomponent mind-body exercise performed at light-to-moderate intensity that may provide a more feasible alternative to traditional exercise programs for some cancer survivors. This systematic review evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Tai Chi across the cancer care continuum. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, and CINAHL databases for interventional studies from inception to 18 September 2020. Controlled trials of the effects of Tai Chi training on patient-reported and objectively measured outcomes in cancer survivors were included. Study quality was determined by the RoB 2 tool, and effect estimates were evaluated using the Best Evidence Synthesis approach. Twenty-six reports from 14 trials (one non-randomized controlled trial) conducted during (n = 5) and after treatment (after surgery: n = 2; after other treatments: n = 7) were included. Low-level evidence emerged to support the benefits of 40-60 min of thrice-weekly supervised Tai Chi for 8-12 weeks to improve fatigue and sleep quality in cancer survivors. These findings need to be confirmed in larger trials and tested for scaling-up potential. Insufficient evidence was available to evaluate the effects of Tai Chi on other cancer-related outcomes. Future research should examine whether Tai Chi training can improve a broader range of cancer outcomes including during the pre-treatment and end of life phases.

7.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 20: 15347354211033352, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34549648

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A majority of lung cancer patients are diagnosed at advanced stages. Although there is considerable evidence of the benefits of aerobic exercise and tai-chi for lung cancer patients, little is known about the comparative effectiveness of the 2 exercise modes in advanced lung cancer patients. OBJECTIVES: To explore the feasibility and preliminary effects of aerobic exercise and tai-chi interventions on survival and well-being among advanced lung cancer patients. METHODS: In an assessor-blinded, exploratory randomized controlled trial, 30 advanced lung cancer patients were randomized to an aerobic exercise group, a tai-chi group (both attending 12-week, twice-weekly supervised sessions), or a self-management control group (receiving written exercise guidelines). The primary outcomes focused on feasibility including intervention completion, exercise adherence, and adverse events, while the secondary outcomes addressed preliminary effects and included 1-year survival, cancer symptoms (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, Brief Fatigue Inventory), quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-LC13), physical performance (6-minute walk test, up-and-go, sit-to-stand, 1-leg standing), activity levels (actigraph), and circadian rhythms (salivary cortisol). RESULTS: Intervention feasibility was established with a satisfactory completion rate at post-intervention for the aerobic exercise group (80%) and the tai-chi group (78%). The tai-chi group attained higher adherence than the exercise group in terms of attendance in supervised sessions (89% vs 75% of scheduled classes) and self-practice (225% vs 87% of the prescribed amount). Higher adherence to self-practice in the tai-chi group remained at the 6-month follow-up (81% vs 38% of the prescribed amount). No adverse event as a result of the intervention was reported. Effect-related outcomes did not show statistically significant changes in any group, except an improvement post-intervention in the up-and-go (-2.26, 95% CI: -4.04, -0.48) and sit-to-stand tests (4.52, 95% CI: 2.19, 6.85) in the aerobic exercise group. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the feasibility of aerobic exercise and tai-chi interventions in advanced lung cancer patients. A future study with a larger sample from multiple sites is recommended to confirm the comparative effects of the 2 exercise interventions relative to the self-management group and to enhance the generalizability of the findings.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias Pulmonares , Tai Ji , Ejercicio Físico , Estudios de Factibilidad , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Calidad de Vida
8.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444609

RESUMEN

The public space of a park is one of the most important carriers of social interaction and cultural practice in urban areas. Taking an ethnography of Taijiquan in Chengdu (China) as a case study, this article explores the production of Taijiquan's "park culture space" (PCS). Our analysis revealed that the development of PCS not only transformed "public space" in the park to a "private space" through Taijiquan practice and exchange but also transformed "material space" in the park into "social space" with identification. We found that working on the process of self-managing Taijiquan's "park culture space" included the democratic operation mechanism of communication and consultation, the cooperative operation mechanism of mutual benefit, and the incentive operation mechanism of balancing interests. Taijiquan's "park culture space" was the reproduction of public space that was not only bonded with Taijiquan practice but was also reconstructed and expanded by Taijiquan practitioners. Furthermore, it involved the return of Taijiquan practitioners' historical memory and collective life experience alongside the construction of Taijiquan practitioners' group identity and the development of self-organization.


Asunto(s)
Automanejo , Tai Ji , Antropología Cultural , China , Humanos , Placer
9.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(16)2021 Aug 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34450836

RESUMEN

Since multispectral images (MSIs) and RGB images (RGBs) have significantly different definitions and severely imbalanced information entropies, the spectrum transformation between them, especially reconstructing MSIs from RGBs, is a big challenge. We propose a new approach, the Taiji Generative Neural Network (TaijiGNN), to address the above-mentioned problems. TaijiGNN consists of two generators, G_MSI, and G_RGB. These two generators establish two cycles by connecting one generator's output with the other's input. One cycle translates the RGBs into the MSIs and converts the MSIs back to the RGBs. The other cycle does the reverse. The cycles can turn the problem of comparing two different domain images into comparing the same domain images. In the same domain, there are neither different domain definition problems nor severely underconstrained challenges, such as reconstructing MSIs from RGBs. Moreover, according to several investigations and validations, we effectively designed a multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) to substitute the convolutional neural network (CNN) when implementing the generators to make them simple and high performance. Furthermore, we cut off the two traditional CycleGAN's identity losses to fit the spectral image translation. We also added two consistent losses of comparing paired images to improve the two generators' training effectiveness. In addition, during the training process, similar to the ancient Chinese philosophy Taiji's polarity Yang and polarity Yin, the two generators update their neural network parameters by interacting with and complementing each other until they all converge and the system reaches a dynamic balance. Furthermore, several qualitative and quantitative experiments were conducted on the two classical datasets, CAVE and ICVL, to evaluate the performance of our proposed approach. Promising results were obtained with a well-designed simplistic MLP requiring a minimal amount of training data. Specifically, in the CAVE dataset, to achieve comparable state-of-the-art results, we only need half of the dataset for training; for the ICVL dataset, we used only one-fifth of the dataset to train the model, but obtained state-of-the-art results.


Asunto(s)
Tai Ji , Redes Neurales de la Computación
10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444200

RESUMEN

Contributing to Taijiquan studies, this research uses spatial analysis tools in ArcGIS 10.3 and SPSS 23.0 to map out the spatial distributional pattern of the Taijiquan organizations in London, and then explores factors attributing to the spatial distribution of Taijiquan culture. The result shows that the distribution of Taijiquan organizations in London generally presents a spatial distribution structure of "dense center + sparse periphery"; the spatial distribution is unbalanced, showing a cohesive distribution; the directional distribution tends to be obvious in areas that are proximate to urban traffic arteries and afforestation in London. Through multivariate hierarchical regression analysis, the study explores the influential factors for the spatial distribution of Taijiquan organizations in London. The results show that: population size, economic level, and education level have little influence on the spatial distribution of Taijiquan organizations; however, the population density of people over 65 years old, the accessibility of public service facilities such as green spaces, and public urban traffic has a significant impact on the spatial distribution of Taijiquan organizations.


Asunto(s)
Parques Recreativos , Tai Ji , Anciano , Humanos , Londres , Organizaciones , Densidad de Población
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e048115, 2021 08 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34408044

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The fatigue-sleep disturbance-depression symptom cluster (FSDSC) is one of the most common and debilitating side effects in patients with breast cancer (BC) throughout their treatment trajectory. Tai chi has been supported as a promising non-pharmacological intervention for the individual symptom relief of cancer-related fatigue, sleep disturbance and depression. However, relevant evidence of using tai chi for FSDSC management in patients with BC has been lacking. METHODS: This study will be a two-arm, single-blinded pilot randomised controlled trial involving an 8-week intervention and a 4-week follow-up. Seventy-two patients with BC experiencing the FSDSC will be recruited from two tertiary medical centres in China. The participants will be randomised to either a tai chi group (n=36) or a control group (n=36). The participants in the tai chi group will receive an 8-week tai chi intervention in addition to standard care, while the participants in the control group will receive standard care only consisting of a booklet on the self-management of cancer symptoms. The primary outcomes will include a series of feasibility assessments of the study protocol in relation to the study's methodological procedures, including subject recruitment and follow-up process, completion of study questionnaires and the feasibility, acceptability and safety of the intervention. The secondary outcomes will be the clinical outcomes regarding the effects of tai chi on the FSDSC and quality of life, which will be evaluated by the Brief Fatigue Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast questionnaires. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was obtained from relevant sites (H19094, KY2019133, 201932). The findings of the study will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and at conferences. TRAIL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04190342; Pre-results.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Tai Ji , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias de la Mama/terapia , Depresión/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Sueño , Síndrome
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26866, 2021 Aug 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34397864

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak began in late 2019 and spread rapidly throughout China and then the rest of the world. COVID-19 is a serious respiratory disease and many patients' exhibit varying levels of persistent parenchymal lung damage. However, there is currently a lack of effective rehabilitation treatments for COVID-19 patients with lung damage. Several clinical trials have shown that Liuzijue Qigong (LQG) can enhance the strength of respiratory muscles and overall quality of life. In this study, a meta-analysis approach was used to assess the effects of LQG on the lung function of COVID-19 patients during disease recovery. METHODS: Eight databases will be explored for relevant investigations including China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, VIP, China Biology Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. All databases will be explored for articles published from inception through July 2021. Data will be extracted independently by 2 researchers according to the eligibility criteria. Finally, RevMan 5.3.0 will be implemented for statistical analyses. RESULTS: The results of this study will show the effects of LQG on the lung function of COVID-19 patients during disease recovery and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSIONS: This study will provide reliable evidence based on the effects of LQG on the lung function of COVID-19 patients during disease recovery. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021268102.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/terapia , Protocolos Clínicos , Pulmón/anomalías , Qigong/normas , COVID-19/psicología , Humanos , Pulmón/fisiopatología , Metaanálisis como Asunto , Qigong/métodos , Pruebas de Función Respiratoria/métodos , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto , Resultado del Tratamiento
14.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 449, 2021 07 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34332537

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Degenerative osteoarthritis (OA) often leads to pain and stiffness of the affected joints, which may affect the physical performance and decrease the quality of life of people with degenerative knee OA. Compared to traditional exercise, tai chi is a safe exercise with slow movements which can facilitate physical functioning and psychological well being, and might be suitable for improving the physical activities of older adults with knee OA. Therefore, this study investigated the impacts of tai chi exercise on the functional fitness of community-dwelling older adults with degenerative knee OA. METHODS: Sixty-eight community-dwelling older adults with knee OA were recruited from the local community to participate in this randomized controlled clinical trial. All subjects were randomly assigned to either an TCE group that practiced tai chi exercise (TCE) (n = 36) or a control group (CON) (n = 32) that received regular health education programs twice per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measurements were determined using functional fitness tests before and after the intervention, including a 30-s chair stand (number of repeats), 30-s arm-curl (number of repeats), 2-min step (number of steps), chair sit-and-reach (reaching distance, cm), back-scratch flexibility (distance between hands, cm), single-leg stand (time, s), functional reach (reaching distance, cm), 8-foot up-and-go (time, s), and 10-m walk tests (time, s). Pre-post comparisons of functional fitness were analyzed using the ANCOVA test with SPSS software version 18.0. RESULTS: Results revealed that participants' functional fitness in the TCE group had significantly higher adjusted mean post-tests scores than that in the CON group after the intervention, including the 8-foot up-and-go (s) (mean difference [MD]=-2.92 [-3.93, -1.91], p = 2.39*10- 7), 30-s arm curl (MD = 4.75 (2.76, 6.73), p = 1.11*10- 5), 2-min step (MD = 36.94 [23.53, 50.36], p = 7.08*10- 7), 30-s chair stand (MD = 4.66 [2.97, 6.36], p = 6.96*10- 7), functional-reach (MD = 5.86 [3.52, 8.20], p = 4.72*10- 6), single-leg stand with eyes closed (MD = 3.44 [1.92, 4.97], p = 2.74*10- 5), chair sit-and-reach (MD = 3.93 [1.72, 6.15], p = 0.001), and single-leg stand with eyes opened (MD = 17.07 [6.29, 27.85], p = 0.002), with large effect sizes (η²=0.14 ~ 0.34). CONCLUSIONS: Community-dwelling older adults with knee OA in the TCE group had better functional fitness performances after the 12-week tai chi intervention than those receiving only health education.


Asunto(s)
Osteoartritis de la Rodilla , Tai Ji , Anciano , Ejercicio Físico , Humanos , Vida Independiente , Osteoartritis de la Rodilla/terapia , Aptitud Física , Calidad de Vida
15.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(7): 7468-7478, 2021 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34353036

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported that C reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients are significantly increased, and their progressive increases are clinical warning indicators of severe and critical severity. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the efficacy of Tai Chi on CRP, TNF-alpha and IL-6, and provide a basis for complementary treatment of COVID-19. METHODS: Five English databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Cochrane Library and Embase) and four Chinese electronic databases (CNKI, Wanfang, China Science and Technology Journal Database and SinoMed) were searched from inception to April 1st, 2020. Combination MeSH and free text terms were used to make up search strategy. Interventions in RCTs were Tai Chi with or without comparison (usual care, health education, drug therapy, psychosocial therapy). Revman version 5.3 was used to analyze the extracted data. Continuous outcomes were described by SMD, and the I2 test was used to assess heterogeneity. Revised Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used to assess methodological quality. RESULTS: Nine RCTs involving 571 participants met the inclusion criteria, and the sample size ranged from 19 to 100 per study. Tai Chi can significantly reduce TNF-alpha (Tai Chi intervention: SMD =-0.92, 95% CI: -1.32 to -0.53; Tai Chi plus drug treatment intervention: SMD =-0.63, 95% CI: -1.15 to -0.11), moreover, it could reduce the amount of IL-6 (Tai Chi intervention: SMD =-0.62, 95% CI: -1.00 to -0.23; Tai Chi plus drug treatment intervention: SMD =-2.17, 95% CI: -3.69 to -0.64) and CRP (Tai Chi plus drug treatment intervention: SMD =-1.98, 95% CI: -2.47 to -1.50) while with a high exercise amount. A low exercise amount of Tai Chi showed poor efficacy on CRP (Tai Chi intervention: SMD =-0.18, 95% CI: -0.61 to 0.25; Tai Chi plus drug treatment intervention: SMD =-0.15, 95% CI: -0.47 to 0.16) and IL-6 (Tai Chi intervention: SMD =0.15, 95% CI: -0.24 to 0.55). DISCUSSION: The strength of evidence might be limited due to relatively low methodological quality, heterogeneity and indirectness. The overall results elucidate that Tai Chi could significantly reduce TNF-alpha while it did not show the same effects in IL-6 and CRP. After subgroup analysis, Tai Chi with a high exercise amount can reduce IL-6 and CRP. Tai Chi with a high exercise amount could be suggested as a complementary intervention for people with COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020177655.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Tai Ji , Proteína C-Reactiva , Humanos , Inflamación/terapia , Interleucina-6 , SARS-CoV-2 , Factor de Necrosis Tumoral alfa
16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34404606

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Geriatric depression is difficult to treat and frequently accompanied by treatment resistance, suicidal ideations and polypharmacy. New adjunctive mind-body treatment strategies can improve clinical outcomes in geriatric depression and reduce risk for side-effects of pharmacological treatments. METHODS: We conducted a 3-month randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy and tolerability of combining Tai Chi Chih (TCC) or Health Education and Wellness training (HEW) with the stable standard antidepressant treatment on mood and cognitive functioning in depressed older adults (NCT02460666). Primary outcome was change in depression as assessed by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) post-treatment. Remission was defined as HAM-D ≤ 6; naturalistic follow-up continued for 6 months. We also assessed psychological resilience, health-related quality of life and cognition. RESULTS: Of the 178 randomized participants, 125 completed the 3-month assessment and 117 completed the 6-month assessment. Dropout and tolerability did not differ between groups. Remission rate within TCC was 35.5% and 33.3%, compared to 27.0% and 45.8% in HEW, at 3 and 6 months respectively (χ2(1) = 1.0, p = 0.3; χ2(1) = 1.9, p =0.2). Both groups improved significantly on the HAM-D at 3 and 6 months. TCC demonstrated a greater improvement in general health compared to HEW. CONCLUSIONS: Both TCC and HEW combined with a standard antidepressant treatment improved symptoms of depression in older adults. While TCC was superior to HEW in improving general health, we did not find group differences in improvement in mood and cognition.

17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34200236

RESUMEN

While studies on the health benefits of Tai Chi have sprung up over the past four decades, few have engaged in collecting global data, estimating the developing trends, and conducting reviews from the perspective of visualization and bibliometric analysis. This study aimed to provide a summary of the global scientific outputs on Tai Chi research from 1980 to 2020, explore the frontiers, identify cooperation networks, track research trends and highlight emerging hotspots. Relevant publications were downloaded from the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC) database between 1980 and 2020. Bibliometric visualization and comparative analysis of authors, cited authors, journals, co-cited journals, institutions, countries, references, and keywords were systematically conducted using CiteSpace software. A total of 1078 publications satisfied the search criteria, and the trend of annual related publications was generally in an upward trend, although with some fluctuations. China (503) and Harvard University (74) were the most prolific country and institution, respectively. Most of the related researches were published in the journals with a focus on sport sciences, alternative medicine, geriatrics gerontology, and rehabilitation. Our results indicated that the current concerns and difficulties of Tai Chi research are "Intervention method", "Targeted therapy", "Applicable population", "Risk factors", and "Research quality". The frontiers and promising domains of Tai Chi exercise in the health science field are preventions and rehabilitations of "Fall risk", "Cardiorespiratory related disease", "Stroke", "Parkinson's disease", and "Depression", which should receive more attention in the future.


Asunto(s)
Tai Ji , Bibliometría , China , Humanos , Publicaciones
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34208823

RESUMEN

Many people living with Parkinson's Disease (PD) face issues with healthcare services, including delays in diagnosis and treatment, as well as limited access to specialized care, including rehabilitation programs. Non-motor and motor signs and symptoms typically observed in people with PD, such as tremor, rigidity, postural instability, bradykinesia, and freezing are particularly disabling and have been associated with falls, fractures, hospitalizations, and a worse quality of life. Baduanjin Qigong (BDJ) programs have been proven potentially effective in improving physical outcomes and reducing the incidence of falls in PD. The aim of this case report, proof-of-concept, study was to explore the adherence, feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of a BDJ program offered via telerehabilitation in people with PD living in the community. Two participants performed semi-supervised exercise sessions at home, twice a week (over eight weeks) using the TeraPlus platform. Adherence, adverse events, and feasibility (technical implementability), acceptability (patient satisfaction), patient-reported, self-reported, and performance outcomes were measured. Results were based on single-subject descriptive data, minimal detectable change, and anchor-based minimally important difference. Our findings suggest that the intervention seems feasible with no major technical issues or adverse events, and high adherence; acceptable (patient satisfaction); and potentially effective to improve markers of walking performance (gait speed, balance), and quality of life (activities of daily living, mobility).


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad de Parkinson , Qigong , Telerrehabilitación , Actividades Cotidianas , Terapia por Ejercicio , Humanos , Equilibrio Postural , Calidad de Vida
19.
Rev Sci Instrum ; 92(5): 054501, 2021 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34243339

RESUMEN

The Taiji program plans to utilize the laser interferometer to measure the movement at the picometer level between free-floating test masses. As the phase readout equipment, the phasemeter needs to obtain the beat note with an accuracy of µrad/Hz. The main source of noise in the phasemeter is the analog frontend of the analog to digital converter. A self-designed phasemeter prototype with a low-noise analog frontend, which includes the theme of the pilot tone correction, has been developed and tested for the Taiji program in this Note. The experimental results show that the performance of the developed phasemeter can satisfy the Taiji sensitivity requirement in the whole frequency range. The sensitivity of the board can reach 0.5 µrad/Hz in the frequency range of 0.1-1 Hz. Therefore, the prototype gives us a good model for the fully functional Taiji phasemeter.

20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34199174

RESUMEN

Practices such as "Reiki", therapeutic touch, healing touch, and external "Qigong" have been regarded as some form of "energy medicine" or "biofield therapy". The biofield concept has been studied and debated by researchers of distinct areas of expertise, and although the phenomenon was sometimes described as physically related to electromagnetics, other factors such as "subtle energy" and focused intention might be involved. These nonconventional practices integrate contact and non-contact techniques, and those dealing with so-called distant healing interventions are perhaps the most difficult to understand and accept. Practitioners describe these so-called nonlocal interventions as involving intentional factors and particular states of consciousness. With a spiritual mindset and a particular state of awareness, compassion is said to work out as a catalyst to produce physiological and physical changes through mechanisms that are still unknown. At the body level, these vegetative changes might be related to individual self-perception variations as part of the body neurovegetative feedback system of regulation. Further mechanisms are difficult to document and measure, and might be more accessible to research by using physical signal detectors, chemical dynamics methods, detectors using biological materials, detectors using living sensors, and detectors using the human body. The growing interest in these practices and the considerable amount of research exploring their effects and clinical applications encouraged this narrative review, which aims to provide an easy to consult partial overview of the history, theory and findings of quantitative research strategies exploring non-contact biofield-based practices. This work also aims to stimulate the reader's mind with the raised hypotheses, catalyzing further research on the subject to confirm or deny the reported outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Terapias Mente-Cuerpo , Qigong , Estado de Conciencia , Fenómenos Electromagnéticos , Humanos , Intención
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