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1.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0232288, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32379779

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Ethnobotanical studies that include participatory methods aim to engage residents in different steps to promote the strengthening and perpetuation of local culture, and empowerment in making decisions about the use of available environmental resources. Thus, the aim of this project was to perform an ethnobotanical survey based on traditional knowledge of medicinal plants with the active participation of residents living in Bairro do Cambury, Ubatuba, São Paulo State, Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During meetings held between the researchers and community members, locally used plants were regarded as an important means for preserving local knowledge for future generations. Some residents showed interest in participating as local partners, and training courses for collecting ethnobotanical data were offered. Local partners and researchers from São Paulo Federal University (Universidade Federal de São Paulo) utilized ethnobotanical methods to select and interview the specialists in medicinal plants for 80 days between 2016 and 2018. Data on plant use were recorded, and plants were collected and deposited in two herbaria. Furthermore, participant observation and fieldwork diaries were used by the researchers, aiding the data analysis. RESULTS: Three local partners participated in objective definitions, data collection, analysis and publication. Nine local specialists were interviewed by the local partners and indicated the use of 82 plant species in 90 recipes for 55 therapeutic uses. These uses were grouped into 12 categories. In addition, a video and booklet were created. CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained during participatory research show that training local communities in the registration of their own knowledge is feasible and necessary since they register knowledge based on local perceptions, as well as valuing knowledge and approaching the current discussion about intellectual property is a global concern.


Asunto(s)
Etnobotánica/métodos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud/etnología , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Brasil/etnología , Testimonio de Experto/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Conocimiento , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Plantas Medicinales , Registros , Participación de los Interesados/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
2.
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi ; 45(3): 689-696, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32237530

RESUMEN

Indigenous knowledge and traditional culture for sustainable use of native plants in Juenang cultural region of Rangtang county, Aba Zang and Qiang Prefecture of Sichuan province, have been characterized in this paper followed the principles and methods of ethnobotany. The results indicate that 38 species from 27 families(including 6 species of fungi) are ethnobotanically used commonly in this area. Of 38 species of the native plants, 13 species from 12 families are collected for eatables and vegetables, 12 families and 16 species of indigenous plants for medicinal and edible use, 4 species from 4 families for decoration, 4 species from 4 families used for building materials or firewood, and 1 species from 1 families used for religious folklore. Under the influence of Juenang culture and Tibetan culture, indigenous knowledge such as instinctive reverence and gratitude for nature, protection ecological environment and habitats, and moderate use of natural resources(especially wild bioresource), have been gotten passed on from generation to generation in Juenang culture region of Rangtang county, which is of great significance to the protection of local bioresources and environment, including ethnic medicinal plants, and also to provide practical guidance for biodiversity conservation and ecological restoration in those alpine ecological vulnerable areas.


Asunto(s)
Etnobotánica , Hongos/clasificación , Plantas Medicinales/clasificación , Biodiversidad , China , Conservación de los Recursos Naturales , Humanos , Conocimiento , Fitoterapia
3.
PLoS One ; 15(2): e0228529, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32027688

RESUMEN

Postpartum care is a critical element for ensuring survival and health of mothers and newborns but is often inadequate in low- and middle-income countries due to barriers to access and resource constraints. Newly delivered mothers and their families often rely on traditional forms of postnatal care rooted in social and cultural customs or may blend modern and traditional forms of care. This ethnographic study sought to explore use of biomedical and traditional forms of postnatal care. Data were collected through unstructured observation and in-depth interviews with 15 mothers. Participants reported embracing traditional understandings of health and illness in the post-partum period centered on heating the body through diet, steaming, and other applications of heat, yet also seeking injections from private health care providers. Thematic analysis explored concepts related to transitioning forms of postnatal care, valuing of care through different lenses, and diverse sources of advice on postnatal care. Mothers also described concurrent use of both traditional medicine and biomedical postnatal care, and the importance of adhering to cultural traditions of postnatal care for future health. Maternal and newborn health are closely associated with postnatal care, so ensuring culturally appropriate and high-quality care must be an important priority for stakeholders including understand health practices that are evolving to include injections.


Asunto(s)
Antropología Cultural , Temperatura Corporal/fisiología , Calor/uso terapéutico , Inyecciones , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Atención Posnatal/métodos , Adulto , Cambodia/epidemiología , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Hipertermia Inducida/métodos , Hipertermia Inducida/psicología , Hipertermia Inducida/estadística & datos numéricos , Salud del Lactante , Recién Nacido , Inyecciones/psicología , Inyecciones/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/estadística & datos numéricos , Madres , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Atención Posnatal/estadística & datos numéricos , Periodo Posparto , Pautas de la Práctica en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Embarazo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 249: 112386, 2020 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31730891

RESUMEN

AIM OF THE STUDY: The indigenous people of Sikkim Himalaya possess indispensable traditional knowledge including the use of flora and fauna due to their close association with nature. The present study aims to explore the rich and undocumented ethnozoological practices of different indigenous communities of the Sikkim Himalaya. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaire interviews among the traditional healers and indigenous communities of Sikkim. A total of 91 respondents covering all four districts of Sikkim were interviewed from September 2017-April 2018. RESULTS: This study recorded a total of 59 species belonging to nine taxonomic groups used for traditional ethnozoological practices by the indigenous communities of Sikkim. Mammals represented 58% of the total animals followed by birds (22%). Among the total, 71% of animal species were used for zootherapy whereas 29% were used for religious customs or shamanistic practices. Almost 64% species were used for treatment of more than one disease and the chief mode of preparation was by boiling the body parts. Among different parts used in traditional medicine, meat was most preferred while horns and hairs were mostly used for religious purposes. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that traditional medicine including zootherapy still serves as a source of primary healthcare in rural areas of Sikkim and provides an identity to the culture of a region. We recommend documentation of more such traditional medicinal systems along with scientific validation of traditional practices with modern tools. Biodiversity Management Committees (BMCs), the legally formed bodies at local level, may be entrusted in documentation of such practices which might contribute significantly in the conservation of traditional practices and also preserves the associated traditional knowledge as per the provision of Biological Diversity Act of India.

5.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 248: 112309, 2020 Feb 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31654798

RESUMEN

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Majority of people living in Ghana and many other developing countries rely on traditional medicinal plants for their primary healthcare. These plants are used either alone or in combination to manage a wide range of ailments. However, most of these plants have not been investigated for their mutagenic effects. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study, therefore aimed at evaluating the mutagenic activity of the most frequently used medicinal plants amongst Ghanaians living within the Accra metropolis, Ghana. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Validated questionnaires were administered to 53 herbalists and herbal medicines dealers in the Makola, Madina and Nima communities. Plants that were identified as being frequently used were investigated for their mutagenicity using the Ames test. RESULTS: A total of 110 medicinal plants belonging to 53 families were identified as most frequently used plants in the study sites. These are used to treat various ailments including gastric ulcer, fever, malaria, male impotence, diabetes, typhoid, high blood pressure and candidiasis. Thirteen samples (52%) showed moderate to high mutagenicity in the TA 100 bacterial strain before and after metabolism with rat liver enzyme. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that over half of the frequently used medicinal plants showed moderate to high mutagenicity before and after metabolism at the concentration of a 100 µg/mL. This may have implications for the safety of those who use them to manage diseases. These findings will suggest the need for an in-depth study of the mutagenic potentials of plants commonly used by indigenous people and more especially for those exhibiting high mutagenicity in this study.


Asunto(s)
Etnofarmacología , Medicina Tradicional Africana/efectos adversos , Mutagénesis , Extractos Vegetales/efectos adversos , Plantas Medicinales/efectos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Seguridad de Productos para el Consumidor , Femenino , Ghana , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pruebas de Mutagenicidad , Medición de Riesgo , Salmonella/efectos de los fármacos , Salmonella/genética , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
6.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 246: 112217, 2020 Jan 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31520672

RESUMEN

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Mauritania is a country in which few ethnobotanical studies have been conducted and consequently the ethnomedical data is scarce. Since the geographical region reflects the transition between tropical and Northern Africa, influenced by the Mediterranean floristic region, the traditional knowledge was influenced by several cultures from tropical Africa as well as Arab, Berber and Islamic societies. AIM OF THE STUDY: This paper aims to explore and compile the diversity of ethnomedical knowledge in one of the regions of Mauritania and to compare the data with similar studies from surrounding territories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surveys and interviews were carried out in 11 villages of Adrar province in northern Mauritania. Data were collected through open, semi-structured interviews (with individuals and focus groups). A sample of 120 people aged between 20 and 70 years, including 24 herbalists and 28 traditional healers was included. RESULTS: Ethnomedical data for 68 plant species belonging to 27 families were obtained. They are used to treat 50 health conditions grouped in 14 pathological groups. Remedies for digestive system disorders, skin problems and respiratory ailments were among the most frequent indications. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part and remedies generally used as a powder for the various applications and a total of 2'317 use reports were gathered. About 55% of the reported species were not cited previously in the literature focusing on Mauritania and neighbouring countries. Moreover, only 6 species are also cited by Ibn al-Baytar (13th century CE). CONCLUSIONS: This work shows a promising perspective for future studies, shedding light on the richness and the risk for conservation of traditional knowledge of herbal medicine in Mauritania.


Asunto(s)
Etnobotánica , Plantas Medicinales , Adulto , Anciano , Recolección de Datos , Etnofarmacología , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Mauritania , Persona de Mediana Edad , Fitoterapia , Preparaciones de Plantas/uso terapéutico , Adulto Joven
7.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 247: 112258, 2020 Jan 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31574342

RESUMEN

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: In northwestern Argentina inhabit several ancient indigenous communities with diverse cultural and historical background. Geographical isolation has contributed to the prevalence of a native plant-based folk medicine; "jarilla" species are medicinal plants widely used in local communities for the treatment of mycosis, respiratory, gastrointestinal and rheumatic disorders. THE AIM OF THE STUDY: To assemble the traditional knowledge acquired through years with scientific data concerning to phytochemistry, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of three "jarillas" species. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ethnobotanical data of three "jarillas", Zuccagnia punctata (Zp), Larrea cuneifolia (Lc), and Larrea divaricata (Ld), were explored by interviewing native people from Indigenous Community of Amaicha del Valle, Tucumán. Phenolic profiles from each infusion were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Antioxidant activity was determined by superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide scavenging capacity, lipoperoxidation inhibition, and ferrous iron chelating activity. It was also assessed their ability to inhibit pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as xanthine oxidase, lipoxygenase, and hyaluronidase. RESULTS: Ethnobotanical interviews showed that local people use "jarillas" mainly as infusions and baths. It was reported different categories of uses, such as medicinal (10 curative applications), to religious purposes, tinctorial, as construction material and as fuel. From infusions prepared, the MS and MS/MS data allowed the identification of 27 compounds from Z. punctata, and 11 from both Larrea sp. The infusions showed an important antioxidant activity through different mechanisms, highlighting Zp and Lc in free radical scavenging capacity and Ld on lipid peroxidation inhibition and iron binding. They were also capable of inhibit xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase enzymes, being Lc the most active one. CONCLUSIONS: This research work provides novel information concerning to several categories of traditional uses of "jarilla" species in a Diaguita-Calchaquí community and focus attention to infusions from a phytochemical and biological approach.


Asunto(s)
Antiinflamatorios/farmacología , Antioxidantes/farmacología , Etnobotánica , Magnoliopsida/química , Extractos Vegetales/farmacología , Antiinflamatorios/uso terapéutico , Antioxidantes/uso terapéutico , Argentina , Baños , Etnofarmacología , Humanos , Pueblos Indígenas , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Extractos Vegetales/uso terapéutico
8.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 353, 2019 Dec 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31806007

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Plants have been used as a primary source of medicine since ancient times and about 80% of the world's population use herbal medicine to treat different ailments. Plant use knowledge differs in space and time and thus requires documentation to avoid its loss from one generation to another. METHODS: In order to accomplish the survey, semi-structured questionnaires were used. The data collected included names of plant species, parts used, ailments treated, growth habit, methods of preparation and mode of administration of the herbal remedies. Descriptive statistics were used to present the data in form of tables and a graph. RESULTS: Results showed that 50 plant species belonging to 26 families were utilized in the treatment of paediatric diseases of which Asteraceae and Lamiaceae were the most common. Leaves (80%) were the most commonly used and decoctions were the main method of preparation. Twenty nine health conditions were treated out of which digestive disorders, malaria and respiratory tract infections were predominant. Herbs and shrubs were equally dominant. CONCLUSION: Herbal remedies are an important source of treatment for paediatric diseases in Buhunga Parish. However, there is need for collaboration between herbal medicine users and scientific institutions to help in the discovery of new drugs based on indigenous knowledge. Scientists ought to explore suitable methods of preparation and dosage formulations in order to achieve the best benefits from herbal remedies.


Asunto(s)
Etnofarmacología , Medicina Tradicional Africana , Preparaciones de Plantas/uso terapéutico , Plantas Medicinales , Niño , Enfermedades del Sistema Digestivo/tratamiento farmacológico , Femenino , Humanos , Malaria/tratamiento farmacológico , Masculino , Infecciones del Sistema Respiratorio/tratamiento farmacológico , Uganda/etnología
9.
Molecules ; 24(23)2019 Nov 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31766438

RESUMEN

Nerine Herbert, family Amaryllidaceae, is a genus of about 30 species that are native to South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, and Swatini (formerly known as Swaziland). Species of Nerine are autumn-flowering, perennial, bulbous plants, which inhabit areas with summer rainfall and cool, dry winters. Most Nerine species have been cultivated for their elegant flowers, presenting a source of innumerable horticultural hybrids. For many years, species of Nerine have been subjected to extensive phytochemical and pharmacological investigations, which resulted in either the isolation or identification of more than fifty Amaryllidaceae alkaloids belonging to different structural types. Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are frequently studied for their interesting biological properties, including antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antifungal, antimalarial, analgesic, cytotoxic, and cholinesterase inhibition activities. The present review aims to summarize comprehensively the research that has been reported on the phytochemistry and pharmacology of the genus Nerine.


Asunto(s)
Alcaloides de Amaryllidaceae/farmacología , Amaryllidaceae/química , Inhibidores de la Colinesterasa/farmacología , Etnobotánica , Extractos Vegetales/farmacología , Humanos
10.
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi ; 44(15): 3187-3194, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31602871

RESUMEN

Ethnomedicine is the precious wealth left by ethnic minorities in their struggle against diseases. It is similar to traditional Chinese medicine in a narrow sense and has the characteristics of multi-component,multi-target and multi-channel synergy. Under the guidance of the theory of ethnomedicine,the combination of ethnomedicine and network pharmacology will help to understand the essence of the prevention and treatment of ethnomedicines in a dynamic and holistic manner. This paper reviews the research progress of network pharmacology applied in ethnomedicine,analyses the problems and challenges existing in the application of network pharmacology in ethnomedicine research at present,such as inaccurate data and information,lack of network analysis platform for effective analysis of dose-effect relationship of chemical constituents and weak basic research of ethnomedicine,and puts forward corresponding prospects.


Asunto(s)
Etnofarmacología , Medicina Tradicional , Medicina China Tradicional
11.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 15(1): 50, 2019 Oct 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31623655

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: To best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative ethnobotanical study with the aim of documenting the local knowledge and practices of using plants for curing diseases in the Cava de' Tirreni area, Salerno Province, Campania Region, Italy. The present ethnobotanical field study, carried out during 2016-2017, documents the local uses of 119 plant species for medicinal, food and domestic purposes. METHODS: Ethnobotanical data were documented from 70 informants: field data were collected and information on the uses of plants was gathered through semi-structured and structured interviews with persons who still retain traditional ethnobotanical knowledge. Documented data were evaluated using the quantitative ethnobotanical index of use value (UV). RESULTS: Overall, the informants native of the area were interviewed and 277 use-reports have been recorded. The scientific names, local names, plant part used, preparation and administration processes are reported and compared with practices in other Southern Italian regions. In total, 101 species are documented as medicinal, 36 as food or food aromatizer, 29 for domestic and handicraft uses, 10 in veterinary medicine. More or less 64% of all species have more uses and over half of the food plants (23 species) are also used for medicinal purposes. CONCLUSIONS: The comparison of the documented species and their uses with ethnobotanical literature of other Italian regions reveals that the traditional plant knowledge in this area shows strong similarities with adjacent Southern Italian areas. Some of the recorded species and administration processes however seem to be unique for the zone.


Asunto(s)
Etnobotánica , Medicina Tradicional , Plantas Medicinales , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Italia , Conocimiento , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Preparaciones de Plantas , Plantas Comestibles
12.
PLoS One ; 14(9): e0222231, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31509582

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: While parents' construction of and actions around child growth are embedded in their cultural framework, the discourse on child growth monitoring (CGM) has been using indicators grounded in the biomedical model. We believe that for CGM to be effective, it should also incorporate other relevant socio-cultural constructs. To contribute to the further development of CGM to ensure that it reflects the local context, we report on the cultural conceptualization of healthy child growth in rural Tanzania. Specifically, we examine how caregivers describe and recognize healthy growth in young children, and the meanings they attach to these cultural markers of healthy growth. METHODS: Caregivers of under-five children, including mothers, fathers, elderly women, and community health workers, were recruited from a rural community in Kilosa District, Southeastern Tanzania. Using an ethnographic approach and the cultural schemas theory, data for the study were collected through 19 focus group discussions, 30 in-depth interviews, and five key informant interviews. Both inductive and deductive approaches were used in the data analysis. RESULTS: Participants reported using multiple markers for ascertaining healthy growth. These include 'being bonge' (chubby), 'being free of illness', 'eating well', 'growing in height', as well as 'having good kilos' (weight). Despite the integration of some biomedical concepts into the local conceptualization of growth, the meanings attached to these concepts are largely rooted in the participants' cultural framework. For instance, a child's weight is ascribed to the parents' adherence to postpartum sex taboos and to the nature of a child's bones. The study noted conceptual differences between the meanings attached to height from a biomedical and a local perspective. Whereas from a biomedical perspective the height increment is considered an outcome of growth, the participants did not see height as linked to nutrition, and did not believe that they have control over their child's height. CONCLUSIONS: To provide context-sensitive advice to mothers during CGM appointments, health workers should use a tool that takes into account the mothers' constructs derived from their cultural framework of healthy growth. The use of this approach should facilitate communication between health professionals and caregivers during CGM activities, increase the uptake and utilization of CGM services, and, eventually, contribute to reduced levels of childhood malnutrition in the community.


Asunto(s)
Antropología Cultural/métodos , Desarrollo Infantil/fisiología , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/psicología , Antropología Cultural/tendencias , Cuidadores , Preescolar , Agentes Comunitarios de Salud , Características Culturales , Cultura , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional Africana/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación de Necesidades/estadística & datos numéricos , Padres , Población Rural , Factores Socioeconómicos , Tanzanía/etnología
13.
J Anal Psychol ; 64(4): 548-564, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31418834

RESUMEN

This paper discusses the main features of Siberian identity formed throughout the historical development of Siberia under the influence of social, economic, geographical, climatic, and other factors. Siberian cultural identity is closely connected with the mythology and ancient religion of the indigenous peoples of Siberia - shamanism, whose rituals, images, symbols, and motifs are often manifested in the clients' dreams. Following an in-depth study of Siberian history and culture, I formulate a complex of homelessness rooted in a deep collective trauma that left its imprint on people's psyche. Three clinical cases presented in the paper reveal a deep relationship between cultural complexes and collective traumas on the one hand, and individual complexes and traumas, on the other. My psychotherapeutic practice shows that a client's awareness of their history and culture brings them closer to the meaning and source of their suffering, which, in turn, helps them find their own way of individuation, rather than relive the transgenerational trauma of their ancestors.


Asunto(s)
Cultura , Trauma Psicológico/etnología , Chamanismo , Identificación Social , Adulto , Sueños , Femenino , Humanos , Interpretación Psicoanalítica , Terapia Psicoanalítica , Siberia/etnología
14.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 15(1): 41, 2019 Aug 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31426826

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Wuliang Mountains of the Jingdong region is a settlement area of the Yi community located in south-western Yunnan Province in China. Due to its unique geographical location, this area harbours abundant medicinal plant resources. The medicinal plants used by the local people have a long history and play an important role in their daily life. During the long-term mixed lifestyle, the knowledge of traditional medicinal plants in different communities has been assimilated to some extent. Therefore, this paper is based on ethnobotanical investigations to document traditional medicinal plants used by local people and discuss the differences between the Yi and Han communities in the study area. METHODS: Data on traditional medicinal plants were collected from September 2016 to August 2017 in the Yi autonomous county of Jingdong. Seven townships and 16 villages were selected for the field investigations. Information was obtained through key informant interviews. A total of 44 key informants were interviewed, and all of them were herbalists or herbal sellers. RESULTS: In this study, a total of 302 traditional medicinal plant species belonging to 117 families and 252 genera were investigated and documented, most of which were obtained from herbalists. Although family Asteraceae was the most prevalent, with 27 species, the most commonly utilized species were members of family Papaveraceae, Dactylicapnos scandens (D. Don) Hutch., which is used as an antipyretic drug. Herbs comprised half of the total number of species, and the whole plant is the most frequently utilized plant part. The plants were used to treat more than 93 human diseases, with antipyretic drugs being the most common form of herbal medicine. The traditional medicinal plants used in the study area possess a high ratio of being documented in the literature. According to the analysis, the Chinese Pharmacopoeia recorded 76 species and the Resources of Traditional Chinese Medicine recorded 233 species of traditional medicinal plants. By evaluating the endangered status of the traditional medicinal plants in the study area, we found good conservation status of the cited medicinal plants. Regarding the similarity between the communities, there were significant differences between the Yi and Han communities, as indicated by the Jaccard similarity index (0.232). CONCLUSIONS: Medicinal plants are the embodiment of wisdom from our ancestors and play a significant role in treating various human disorders. As one of the birthplaces of Yi medicine, the study area possesses a high species diversity of traditional medicinal plants used by local people. With the rapid development of modern medicine, however, the inheritance of this valuable culture is facing enormous threats even though its potential value has not yet been fully explored. Therefore, some effective protection measures should be taken, and some modern techniques should be implemented to prove the safety and improve the scientific acceptance of the traditional medicinal plants.


Asunto(s)
Etnobotánica/métodos , Mercadotecnía/economía , Medicina China Tradicional/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Fitoterapia/métodos , Plantas Medicinales/clasificación , China , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Fitoterapia/estadística & datos numéricos , Población Rural
15.
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi ; 44(13): 2865-2870, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31359702

RESUMEN

To analyze the TCM health culture level and influence factors of Chinese citizens in 2017. PPS sampling combined with random sampling was used to select the residents aged between 15-69 years old in 30 provinces as the respondents,and a questionnaire study was conducted to investigate their TCM health culture level. In 2017,there were 87 287 valid questionnaires for Chinese citizens' TCM health culture level,including 48. 25% male and 51. 75% female,with a sex ratio of 1 ∶ 1. 073. In 2017,the overall TCM health culture level was 13. 39%,specifically 18. 77% for the urban areas and 10. 51% for the rural areas. Compared with people who were illiterate or less literate,people with an educational background of elementary school,junior high school,high school/vocational/technical school and junior college/university had a higher TCM health culture level,and the OR values were 1. 584( 95% CI[1. 166,2. 152]),2. 827( 95%CI[1. 839,4. 345]),5. 651( 95%CI[3. 637,8. 781]),9. 785( 95%CI[6. 187,15. 477]) in order. With civil servants as the reference,medical workers had a higher TCM health culture level( OR = 1. 829,95%CI[1. 279,2. 616]),while farmers had the lowest TCM health culture level( OR = 0. 493,95% CI[0. 349,0. 697]). Compared with people with the annual household income per capita of 20 000 yuan and below,people with the annual household income per capita between 20 000-50 000,50 000-80 000,80 000 yuan or above had a higher TCM health culture level,and the OR values were 1. 176( 95% CI[0. 963,1. 437]),1. 458( 95%CI[1. 168,1. 820]) and 1. 930( 95%CI[1. 509,2. 469]). Based on the differences between urban and rural areas,the influence factors of citizens' TCM health culture level include education,occupation and income.


Asunto(s)
Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Asiática , Alfabetización en Salud , Medicina China Tradicional , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , China , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
16.
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi ; 44(13): 2886-2892, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31359706

RESUMEN

Through summarizing the applications and funding for research related to ethnomedicine and ethnopharmacology in the department of Health Sciences of the National Natural Science Foundation of China( NSFC) from 1986 to 2018,and analyzing the categories,numbers,funds and research contents of all funded projects including Mongolian,Uygur,Tibetan,Zhuang,Miao,the study is aimed to provide certain reference for the declaration of ethnic medicine project. The results showed that the national medicine project application numbers and the amount of funding growth after 2011 have increased significantly,but the overall level of research remained to be further promoted,and the lack of suitable for the study of ethnic medicine features and ways,has yet to mainland medical universities and research institutions to give more attention and jointly promote the development of basic research in the field of ethnic medicine.


Asunto(s)
Etnofarmacología , Administración Financiera , Fundaciones , China , Medicina Tradicional
17.
Phytother Res ; 33(9): 2163-2178, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31290201

RESUMEN

Ageratum conyzoides L. (Asteraceae) is an invasive aromatic herb with immense therapeutic importance. The herb is distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. A. conyzoides has imparted numerous ethnomedicinal uses because it has been used to cure various ailments that include leprosy, skin disorders, sleeping sickness, rheumatism, headaches, dyspnea, toothache, pneumonia and many more. A number of phytoconstituents have been scrutinized such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, chromenes, and sterols from almost every part of this plant. These phytoconstituents have shown diverse pharmacological properties including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antioxidant, anticancer, antiprotozoal, antidiabetic, spasmolytic, allelopathy, and many more. The plant A. conyzoides has provided a platform for doing pharmaceutical and toxicological research in order to isolate some promising active compounds and authenticate their safety in clinical uses. A. conyzoides provides principal information for advanced studies in the field of pharmaceutical industries and agriculture. Present review article describes the cytogenetics, ethnobotany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicological aspects of A. conyzoides.


Asunto(s)
Ageratum/química , Etnofarmacología/métodos , Fitoquímicos/uso terapéutico , Fitoterapia/métodos , Humanos , Fitoquímicos/farmacología , Extractos Vegetales/química , Extractos Vegetales/farmacología
18.
Bol. latinoam. Caribe plantas med. aromát ; 18(4): 392-410, jul. 2019. mapas, tab, graf
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS | ID: biblio-1008179

RESUMEN

An ethnobotanical study was conducted with the aim to identify the medicinal plants used for the treatment of Diabetes mellitus (DM) in Sidi Bel Abbes region (Northwest Algeria). Sidi Bel Abbes, known for its diverse ecological habitats, such as mountains, steppe, lake, and fertile plains with diverse medicinal plants. The data was collected through questionnaire and interviews with inhabitants and traditional healers. The results obtained revealed that 33 plant species distributed in 20 genera belonging to 21 families for the treatment of DM were used. The most represented families were Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, Myrtaceae, Fabaceae and Lauraceae. Medicinal plants commonly used were Trigonella foenum-graecum, Olea europaea, Cinamomum cassia, Artemisia herba-alba, Lupinus albus, Juniperus communis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Prunus dulcis and Berberis vulgaris. The study revealed that, leaves, followed by seeds and stem bark were mostly used parts. Also, decoction and infusion were the most frequently used method of preparation. This study confirms that most people with Diabetes mellitus in the study areas rely on traditional medicine for their primary health care needs.


Se realizó un estudio etnobotánico con el objetivo de identificar las plantas medicinales utilizadas para el tratamiento de la Diabetes mellitus (DM) en la región de Sidi Bel Abbes (noroeste de Algeria). Sidi Bel Abbes, conocida por sus diversos hábitats ecológicos, como montañas, estepas, lagos y fértiles llanuras con plantas medicinales. Los datos se recopilaron mediante cuestionarios y entrevistas con habitantes y curanderos tradicionales. Los resultados obtenidos revelaron que 33 especies vegetales distribuidas en 20 géneros pertenecientes à 21 familias fueron utilizadas para el tratamiento de DM. Las familias más representadas fueron Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, Myrtaceae, Fabaceae y Lauraceae. Las plantas medicinales comúnmente utilizadas fueron Trigonella foenum-graecum, Olea europaea, Cinamomum cassia, Artemisia herba-alba, Lupinus albus, Juniperus communis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Prunus amygdalus y Berberis vulgaris. El estudio reveló que las hojas, seguidas de las semillas y la corteza de tallo, eran en su mayoría partes usadas. Sin embargo, la infusión y la decocción son el método de preparación más utilizado. El estudio reveló que las hojas, seguidas de las semillas y las partes del área, eran en su mayoría partes utilizadas. Tambien, la decocción y la infusión fueron los métodos de preparación más utilizado. Este estudio confirma que la mayoría de las personas con Diabetes mellitus en las áreas d'estudio dependen de la medicina tradicional para sus necesidades d'atenciónn primaria de la salud.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Anciano , Plantas Medicinales , Hojas de la Planta , Etnobotánica , Preparaciones de Plantas/uso terapéutico , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamiento farmacológico , Semillas , Extractos Vegetales/uso terapéutico , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Argelia , Medicina Tradicional
19.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 15(1): 29, 2019 Jun 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31238949

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Orchidaceae are noted for their floral diversity. In the Mount Cameroon Region (MCR), the genus Bulbophyllum is the most represented genus of the entire flora of this region. Despite the large number of different species in Orchidaceae, very little is known and documented about the orchids in Cameroon at large, in the MCR in particular. Orchids are widely used in flower gardens and trade. The aim of this study was to assess the floristic value of the orchids compared with those of other parts of the world and equally assess species which are used in herbal medicines. METHODS: This research was carried out in the MCR and the main flower market in Cameroon. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to vendors, buyers, and cultivators at a ratio of 1:1:1, as well as to herbalists and cultural use indices computed. A total of 107 flower gardens in all gardening localities (07) of the region were sampled. RESULTS: A total of 66 out of 107 gardens had at least one orchid species. Five orchids which are hybrids cultivated by vegetative propagation are traded as ornamental plants in the MCR. A total of 23 species were used for herbal treatment of certain ailments. The ethnobotanical richness of orchids was scored at 6.86. Ansellia africana had the highest cultural importance index (CI), relative importance index (RI), and the relative use index (RNU) while tradactyle tridactylites had the lowest. It was also found that most orchids were used for clairvoyance that is highly associated with myths or folklore and also for external application. CONCLUSION: The level of awareness on uses of orchids in the MCR is low. Many people consume orchids mixed with different species of plants for herbal treatment. Orchid trade is used as a part of subsistence by orchid cultivators and vendors.


Asunto(s)
Etnobotánica , Mercadotecnía , Orchidaceae , Fitoterapia , Plantas Medicinales , Camerún , Flores , Jardinería , Humanos
20.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 15(1): 24, 2019 May 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31122247

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Krummhübel (after 1945, Karpacz) in the Sudety Mountains (now SW Poland) was called "the village of pharmacists". At the end of the seventeenth century, there were 57 households, of which about 40 were inhabited by herbalists. Krummhübel herbalists were the first in the Sudety region who applied medicinal mixtures for the treatment of various diseases (using, among others, plants, oils, minerals and even viper venom) in contrast to previous herbalists who only indicated the use of individual plant species for specific diseases. Riesengebirge (in Polish Karkonosze) potions were sold in Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland and Russia, and some of them could even be purchased in Scandinavia and England. The purpose of this paper is an ethnopharmacological analysis of historical texts of herbalists from Krummhübel. Based on their recipes, we analysed the use reports of drugs. Recently, research on ethnobotany and ethnopharmacological analyses of historical materials or egodocuments related to formulations used in folk medicine have become an important source of acquiring knowledge about new medicines. METHODS: Based on 46 recipes of Krummhübel herbalists re-written by Reitzig (1943), we analysed the use reports of drugs which included plant taxa and other constituents such as animal formulations, fungi, inorganic and organic substances and minerals as well as tinctures (with alcohol/spirit) and elixirs (without alcohol/spirit). For each usage mentioned in the text, we recorded (i) the putative botanical identity of the taxon; (ii) the plant family or origin of other than the plant constituent; (iii) the reported plant part; (iv) the number of the recipe; (v) the name of the recipe; (vi) the vernacular name of ingredient; (vii) the described symptom, ailment or specific use; (viii) our modern (viz. biomedical) interpretation of the described symptom or ailment; (ix) the mode of administration; and (x) the category of use under which we filed the specific use. We also cross-checked the medicinal plants of Krummhübel herbalists with the species described in old manuscripts and regional surveys and compared their use with contemporary plant use. RESULTS: The paper introduces the generated database comprising 348 use reports of 46 drugs based on 70 plant taxa and other constituents. Besides, we address patterns such as the frequent recommendation of Fabaceae herbs for respiratory system issue and gynaecology and Asteraceae for respiratory system and cardiovascular problems. Gastrointestinal use reports are based on Asphodelaceae, Burseraceae and Rosaceae species. CONCLUSIONS: Remedies that lost importance over time as well as drugs used for diseases now controlled by conventional medicine may be interesting starting points for research on herbal medicine and drug discovery. It seems to be important to attempt to reproduce therapeutic mixtures from the preserved recipes of Krummhübel herbalists, which offers an opportunity to learn more about the real effects of the former medicines and their therapeutic activity. The obtained data can also be used to search for new drugs.


Asunto(s)
Etnofarmacología/historia , Fitoterapia/historia , Historia del Siglo XVII , Historia del Siglo XVIII , Historia del Siglo XIX , Humanos , Polonia
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