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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38490264

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To examine experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) screening among women who sell sex. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study. SETTING: Telephone interviews during the COVID-19 pandemic (June 2020 to October 2020). PARTICIPANTS: Women aged 18 to 49 years who sold or traded sex for food, drugs, money, or shelter at least three times during the past 3 months before recruitment (N = 22). METHODS: We used individual, semistructured telephone interviews to collect data about participants' experiences with IPV and IPV screening during health care encounters. We used reflexive thematic analysis to examine these data. RESULTS: We identified two overarching themes related to IPV screening experiences: Preferences for IPV Screening and Barriers to Disclosure of IPV Experiences. Participants described a preference for IPV screening done face-to-face with providers who show a genuine interest in their responses. Stigma was a barrier of IPV disclosure. CONCLUSION: Health care providers are a trusted safety net for disclosure of IPV experiences. Providing screening in a trauma-informed, nonstigmatizing manner may facilitate disclosure of IPV by women who sell sex. Future research among marginalized populations is needed to examine ways to address IPV in clinical settings with a harm reduction empowerment lens.

2.
J Prof Nurs ; 50: 35-42, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38369369

RESUMEN

The intricacies of the unique educational and leadership development trajectories of Black PhD-prepared nurse scientists are largely invisible in nursing faculty development literature. A broadened understanding of nursing leadership development and science mentorship can facilitate support for the next generation of Black nurse scientists. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) can serve as formative launch pads for nurse scientist development. However, the role of HBCUs and strategies for supporting robust educational and mentor/training opportunities for Black PhD-prepared nurse scientists require thoughtful description and application. Incorporating an intrapersonal, interpersonal, and integrative leadership framework, we describe and synthesize four Black nurse scientists and HBCU graduates' experiences to highlight early science mentorship and leadership resilience through the excellent educational foundations provided at HBCUs.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Docentes de Enfermería , Liderazgo , Universidades , Humanos , Mentores
3.
AIDS Behav ; 2024 Feb 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38351279

RESUMEN

While multi-level theories and frameworks have become a cornerstone in broader efforts to address HIV inequities, little is known regarding their application in adolescent and young adult (AYA) HIV research. To address this gap, we conducted a scoping review to assess the use and application of multi-level theories and frameworks in AYA HIV prevention and care and treatment empirical research. We systematically searched five databases for articles published between 2010 and May 2020, screened abstracts, and reviewed eligible full-text articles for inclusion. Of the 5890 citations identified, 1706 underwent full-text review and 88 met the inclusion criteria: 70 focused on HIV prevention, with only 14 on care and treatment, 2 on both HIV prevention and care and treatment, and 2 on HIV-affected AYA. Most authors described the theory-based multi-level framework as informing their data analysis, with only 12 describing it as informing/guiding an intervention. More than seventy different multi-level theories were described, with 38% utilizing socio-ecological models or the eco-developmental theory. Findings were used to inform the adaptation of an AYA World Health Organization multi-level framework specifically to guide AYA HIV research.

5.
Gerontologist ; 2023 Nov 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38015951

RESUMEN

As we age, the ability to move is foundational to health. Life space is one measure of a person's ability to move and engage in activity beyond the home. A separate but related concept is activity space, a measurement of a person's spatial behaviors and visited locations that include social networks, neighborhoods, and institutions. In this article, we integrate the literature on life space and activity space discussing how physical function is not only determined by individual capabilities, but also by the surrounding social and environmental factors which may limit their agency. We show how structural racism contributes to inequities within this paradigm linking related concepts of movement, agency, belonging, and timing. We also explore implications for research and theory for mobility, social connection, and activity.

6.
J Adv Nurs ; 2023 Nov 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37921256

RESUMEN

AIM: The aim of this study is to provide insight from maternal survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) describing their experiences with their ex-partners' firearm ownership, access, storage and behaviours in the context of co-parenting and separation. DESIGN: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study informed by the IPV and Coparenting Model. METHODS: The analytic sample consists of self-identified maternal survivors (n = 14) who completed semi-structured qualitative interviews between January and May 2023 describing experiences of post-separation abuse. Participants were recruited through social media and domestic violence advocacy and legal aid organizations. In the interview guide, participants were asked one item about firearm exposure: Have you or your children had any experiences with guns and your ex-partner that made you or your children feel scared? Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Interview transcripts were managed and coded in ATLAS.ti using a codebook. Codes were applied using descriptive content analysis, discrepancies reconciled and themes related to firearm exposure in the context of post-separation abuse identified. RESULTS: Six themes emerged related to firearm experiences and post-separation abuse: (1) gun ownership (2) gun access; (3) unsafe storage; (4) direct and symbolic threats; (5) involving the children; (6) survivors' protective actions. CONCLUSION: This manuscript provides context on how abusive ex-partners' firearm ownership, access and threats cause terror and pervasive fear for mothers and children following separation. Analysis of qualitative data provides important insights into opportunities to address firearm injury prevention. IMPACT: Findings add to the contextual understanding of how survivors of IPV experience non-fatal firearm abuse. Existing quantitative data may not capture the full extent of fear caused by perpetrators' gun ownership access and symbolic threats. Data from this study can help inform firearm injury prevention efforts. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: The authors would like to acknowledge and thank the individuals who helped in cognitive testing of the interview guide prior to conducting interviews with participants, including (3) survivors of post-separation abuse. The authors would also like to acknowledge domestic violence advocates and those individuals who helped with recruitment and connected us with participants. Importantly, with deep gratitude, the authors would like to thank the participants who generously shared their time and stories with us.

7.
Curr HIV/AIDS Rep ; 20(5): 296-311, 2023 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37768511

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Intimate partner violence (IPV) remains a critical challenge to HIV prevention and treatment efforts across the globe. We examined recently published (January 9, 2017-January 9, 2023) integrated behavioral interventions designed to address IPV and HIV across the care continuum. RECENT FINDINGS: Fifteen studies (involving n = 10,947 participants) met the inclusion criteria for this review. Majority (n = 13) of studies focused on IPV and HIV prevention whereas two studies addressed IPV and HIV care engagement among women living with HIV. Ten studies were conducted on the African continent representing 5 countries. Most interventions (n = 11) focused on individual-level outcomes among cisgender women although two involved male partners. About half of the interventions reviewed (n = 8) showed effectiveness on both IPV and HIV outcomes compared to control groups. Integrated HIV/IPV interventions are needed to address the synergistic nature of these epidemics among marginalized populations. Future studies should focus on developing and implementing strength-based interventions among people living with HIV, men, transgender people, and Black women in the USA. Additionally, researchers and program managers should consider addressing structural and internalized stigma as potential behavioral mechanisms for improving health among people simultaneously experiencing or at-risk for HIV and IPV.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Violencia de Pareja , Personas Transgénero , Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Violencia de Pareja/prevención & control , Terapia Conductista
8.
Sex Reprod Healthc ; 37: 100877, 2023 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37399761

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Emerging adult-aged (EA;18-25 years) women have disproportionately high rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections compared to other women of reproductive age. Little is known about how EA women define and prioritize various aspects of sexual and reproductive health. The purpose of this study was to identify EA women determined definitions of sexual and reproductive health. METHODS: Between September 2019 and September 2020, 13 women were interviewed about their sexual and reproductive health. Interview transcripts were used to conduct qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Definitions provided by participants were grouped according to three distinct thematic categories, Being Safe, Healthcare as a Tool, and Mind-Body Connection. Being Safe included using condoms and taking steps to prevent sexually transmitted infections. Healthcare as a Tool referred to utilization of healthcare services (e.g., an annual exam) to manage sexual and reproductive health. Mind-Body Connection included acknowledgement of both the physical and mental aspects of sexual and reproductive health, as well as awareness of physical and emotional discomfort related to it. These categories highlight EA women's holistic definitions of sexual and reproductive health. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare providers and researchers can use the holistic sexual and reproductive health definitions endorsed by EA women in this study as a starting point for creating and delivering sexual and reproductive healthcare and counseling that is developmentally appropriate and sensitive to population-specific needs.


Asunto(s)
Salud Reproductiva , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual , Embarazo , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Conducta Sexual , Salud de la Mujer , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/prevención & control , Condones
9.
Health Promot Int ; 38(4)2023 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37440255

RESUMEN

Women in the US Virgin Islands (USVI) experience intimate partner violence (IPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at disproportionate rates compared to women on the US mainland. Women in violent relationships report experiencing controlling behaviours that decrease their ability to negotiate for sex using condoms or to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Though several evidence-based interventions exist to prevent either IPV or HIV, few address them through an integrated health promotion approach or attend to particular USVI cultural mores. This article describes the systematic development of a theory based, culturally tailored, integrated health promotion intervention that addresses IPV and HIV among USVI women experiencing abuse. The process included: (i) identifying and integrating evidence-based health promotion interventions, (ii) conducting formative research using focus groups, (iii) synthesizing focus group data to inform intervention development and (iv) developing a culturally and linguistically appropriate intervention specific to the needs and concerns of USVI women. The Empowered Sisters Project: Making Choices Reducing Risks (ESP) was developed through this research. ESP is a three-session health promotion curriculum focussed on enhancing sexual health and safety among women experiencing abuse. The ESP intervention components included promoting condom use, increasing IPV and HIV knowledge and developing a personalized safety plan. Health professionals facilitated individual intervention sessions using culturally tailored visual media and scripts. This program focussed on experiences of women living in the USVI and has implications for utility across the Caribbean diaspora.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Violencia de Pareja , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual , Humanos , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , VIH , Islas Virgenes de los Estados Unidos , Violencia , Promoción de la Salud , Violencia de Pareja/prevención & control
10.
J Interpers Violence ; 38(19-20): 11091-11116, 2023 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37387530

RESUMEN

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent consequence of physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV); however, little is known about the unique contributions of economic IPV. Furthermore, women's economic self-sufficiency may explicate the potential relationship between economic IPV and PTSD symptoms. Guided by the Stress Process Theory and Intersectionality, this study examined associations between economic IPV and women's PTSD symptoms and assessed economic self-sufficiency as a mediator. Participants were 255 adult women experiencing IPV recruited from metropolitan Baltimore, MD, and the state of CT who participated in two different studies. Participants completed surveys on IPV, economic self-sufficiency, and PTSD. Path analyses were conducted to examine direct and indirect associations of economic IPV with economic self-sufficiency and PTSD. Economic IPV was uniquely associated with PTSD symptoms while controlling for other forms of IPV. Economic self-sufficiency significantly partially mediated the association between economic IPV and PTSD symptoms such that economic IPV was associated with PTSD symptoms through economic self-sufficiency. Economic IPV may limit women's ability to make autonomous decisions related to finances, which could be distressing. The mental health impact of economic IPV may be particularly debilitating for women with low economic self-sufficiency as their posttraumatic stress occurs within the context of feeling unable to meet their financial goals and also having a partner control their economic resources. Fostering economic empowerment and asset building may be a strengths-based approach to reduce the PTSD symptomatology among women experiencing IPV.


Asunto(s)
Violencia de Pareja , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático , Adulto , Humanos , Femenino , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/epidemiología , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/psicología , Violencia de Pareja/psicología , Conducta Sexual , Salud Mental , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
11.
Womens Health (Lond) ; 19: 17455057231183837, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37377349

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Sexual autonomy is an influential component of sexual health risk reduction frameworks, but a universal assessment of sexual autonomy is currently lacking. OBJECTIVES: This study develops and validates the Women's Sexual Autonomy scale (WSA), a comprehensive measure that captures women's perception of their sexual autonomy. DESIGN: Forty-one items were initially created based on current research and in consultation with sexual health experts. In Phase I, a cross-sectional study with 127 women was conducted to finalize the scale. In Phase II, a cross-sectional study with 218 women was conducted to test the stability and validity of the scale. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted with an independent sample of 218 participants. METHODS: In Phase I, principal component analysis with promax rotation was conducted to examine the factor structure for the sexual autonomy scale. Cronbach's alphas were conducted to assess the internal consistency of the sexual autonomy scale. In Phase II, confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to confirm the factor structure of the scale. Logistic and linear regressions were used to assess validity of the scale. Unwanted condomless sex and coercive sexual risk were used to test construct validity. Intimate partner violence was used to test predictive validity. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors across 17 items: 4 items on sexual cultural scripting (Factor 1), 5 items on sexual communication (Factor 2), 4 items on sexual empowerment (Factor 3), and 4 items on sexual assertiveness (Factor 4). Internal consistency for the total scale and subscales were adequate. The WSA scale showed construct validity by negatively relating to unwanted condomless sex and coercive sexual risk, and predictive validity by negatively relating to partner violence. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest the WSA scale provides a valid, reliable assessment of sexual autonomy for women. This measure can be incorporated into future studies investigating sexual health.


Asunto(s)
Asertividad , Violencia de Pareja , Autonomía Personal , Conducta Sexual , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Psicometría/métodos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Salud de la Mujer , Terapia Conductista
12.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(11): 4255-4267, 2023 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37313997

RESUMEN

STUDY AIM: To describe how socioecological influences of housing instability affect pregnancy health among birthing and postpartum people. DESIGN: We used the socioecological framework to guide this exploratory descriptive study using semi-structured, in-depth interviews. METHODS: We purposively recruited birthing people in the southern mid-Atlantic region. Seventeen one-time, semi-structured interviews were conducted between February 2020 and December 2021 with English-speaking unstably housed participants ≥18 years old, currently pregnant, or recently postpartum. Qualitative and quantitative content approaches were used to analyse transcribed interviews. Dedoose software was used to identify code patterns and refine the codebook until group consensus. The team examined code patterns, explored meaning in text and codified code-generated categories to describe experiences. RESULTS: Majority (82.4%) of participants were African Americans between 22 and 41 years, and most were postpartum (76.5%). Participants described multiple forms of housing instability, reasons for losing housing, challenges with finding housing and strategies for finding housing. Participants did not describe housing instability as a barrier to receiving prenatal care. Building and sustaining individual relationships and social support were prominent factors affecting their housing challenges. Participants also reported a lack of obstetric provider inquiry about housing status during pregnancy. Many reported that challenges with housing triggered mental health issues, especially depression. CONCLUSION: Nurses and other obstetric providers are key points of contact in the prenatal care setting for assessing housing stability. Additionally, refining social structures and funding support services within communities and prenatal health systems should be a strategy for future programme and policy planning improvement. IMPACT: This study highlights critical areas for consideration when addressing social determinants for birthing people and reinforces the need for more comprehensive assessment in the prenatal setting. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Members of the public participated in this study as key informants for study interviews.


Asunto(s)
Inestabilidad de Vivienda , Vivienda , Femenino , Embarazo , Humanos , Adolescente , Periodo Posparto , Apoyo Social , Atención Prenatal
13.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(5): 1898-1911, 2023 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36946262

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim of the study was to examine how female sex worker's motivations, desires, intentions and behaviours towards childbearing and childbearing avoidance inform their contraceptive decision-making. We explored the influence of social determinants of health in the domains of social context (sexual partners and experiences of violence), healthcare access, economic instability on the contraceptive decision-making process. DESIGN: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study informed by Miller's Theory of Childbearing Motivations, Desires and Intentions through the lens of social determinants of health. METHODS: Participants were recruited from a parent study, EMERALD, in July-September, 2020. Data were collected from 22 female sex workers ages 18-49 using semi-structured 45 to 60-min audio-recorded interviews and transcribed verbatim. Theory guided the development of the study's interview guide and thematic analytic strategy. RESULTS: Five themes emerged related to contraceptive decision-making: Motivations (value of fatherhood), Desires (relationships with love), Intentions and Behaviours (drugs overpower everything, contraceptive strategies and having children means being a protector). Women's contraceptive decision-making often included intentions to use contraception. However, social determinants such relationships with clients and intimate partners, interpersonal violence and challenges accessing traditional health care offering contraceptive services often interfered with these intentions and influenced contraceptive behaviours. CONCLUSION: Women's contraceptive decision-making process included well-informed desires related to childbearing and contraceptive use. However, social determinants across domains of health interfered with autonomous contraceptive decision-making. More effort is needed to examine the influence of social determinants on the reproductive health of this population. IMPACT: Findings from this study build on existing research that examines social determinants impacting reproductive health among female sex workers. Existing theoretical frameworks may not fully capture the influence constrained reproductive autonomy has on contraceptive decision-making. Future studies examining interpersonal and structural barriers to contraception are warranted. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: The parent study, EMERALD, collaborated with community service providers in the study intervention.


Asunto(s)
Anticonceptivos , Trabajadores Sexuales , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Anticoncepción , Conducta Sexual , Servicios de Planificación Familiar
14.
Violence Against Women ; : 10778012231153372, 2023 Feb 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36762382

RESUMEN

Women experiencing reproductive coercion (RC) report more unintended pregnancies and mental health symptoms that can influence contraceptive use patterns. We examined associations between RC and contraceptive use among intimate partner violence (IPV) exposed women aged 18-35 (N = 283). We tested depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and co-morbid depression and PTSD as effect modifiers. Though no association was found between RC and contraception, PTSD significantly modified this relationship. Among Black women (n = 112), those reporting RC and either PTSD or comorbid PTSD and depression were less likely to use partner-independent contraception compared to those reporting RC without mental health symptoms. PTSD could be a barrier to contraceptive choice among this population.

15.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(4): 1575-1588, 2023 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35864083

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim was to examine and describe women's emergency department visits and care-seeking experiences, including recognition, evaluation and communication of symptoms, injuries and health risks after non-fatal intimate partner strangulation. DESIGN: Using a diagnostic process framework, this mixed-methods study explores concordance and discordance of interview and medical records data to highlight opportunities for clinical diagnostic improvement. METHODS: In-depth, semi-structured interviews with women after an emergency department visit for non-fatal intimate partner strangulation, concurrent with medical records reviews, were conducted between March 2018 and January 2019. A constant comparative approach was used to analyse interview and medical record data using an a priori codebook designed based on the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine's conceptual model of the diagnostic process and prior intimate partner violence research. RESULTS: Interviews reflected participants did not have a sense of long-term health risks from their strangulation beyond addressing emotional trauma. Women noted that forensic and emergency nursing support was treatment in and of itself that allowed them to be heard and validated. Medical record clinical impressions and final diagnoses included domestic violence, domestic abuse or sexual assault, but not specifically strangulation. CONCLUSION: This study contributes to the growing literature regarding strangulation diagnosis and care. Our findings provide new details of women's emergency department care-seeking experiences which, whilst overall aligned with medical records documentation, were not reflected in final diagnostic impressions nor in patient recollection of long-term health risks. IMPACT: Nurses are strongly positioned as clinical practice leaders and policy advocates to improve collective responses to this dangerous violence mechanism. Actions such as improving patient education, referral and follow-up options to better communication and address long-term strangulation risk are one example. Further research on non-fatal intimate partner strangulation and care-seeking is warranted to expand this knowledge, particularly in longitudinal cohorts and varied geographical areas.


Asunto(s)
Violencia Doméstica , Violencia de Pareja , Femenino , Humanos , Violencia de Pareja/psicología , Parejas Sexuales , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud
17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38166595

RESUMEN

Poly-victimization is often reported by formerly incarcerated women and leads to physical and mental health problems that interfere with daily functioning, sustained employment, and housing stability. Although reentry programs exist, few focus on the physical and emotional impact of multiple traumas. Passport to Freedom (P2F), a woman-centered, trauma-informed reentry program, was developed to support formerly incarcerated women. The pilot intervention, performed in 2017, focused on the connections between trauma and health, coping with symptoms, and managing one's own health. To examine the effectiveness and feasibility of the intervention, we performed the current mixed methods study with two phases: (1) focus groups, and (2) sessions combining mindfulness and health promotion activities with follow-up evaluations. Participants (N = 24) showed decreased symptoms of depression and concerns of everyday stressors after the intervention. Of participants, 84% (n = 16) reported practicing mindfulness and 63% (n = 8) stated that mindfulness exercises helped with daily stress management. The P2F program offers a promising approach to support formerly incarcerated women with health self-management. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(xx), xx-xx.].

18.
Violence Against Women ; : 10778012221145292, 2022 Dec 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36567608

RESUMEN

Reproductive coercion (RC) is a type of intimate partner violence that includes birth control sabotage (BCS). We explored the perceived intent behind BCS to refine RC measurement, using a mixed-methods design with a clinic-based sample of Latina women (13 interviews; 482 surveys). Women perceived partners used BCS for reasons beyond pregnancy promotion. Specifically, 16.8% of participants reported any past-year RC; this decreased to 9.5% when asked if their partner used BCS with the sole intent of getting them pregnant. RC measures and assessment should separate behavior from intent in BCS questions to not underestimate the prevalence and to guide clinical response.

19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(10): e2236285, 2022 10 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36264582
20.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 90(3): 283-290, 2022 07 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35364598

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention method for women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). This study aimed to examine (1) relationships between physical, sexual, and psychological IPV and women's PrEP communication with a health care provider and domestic violence advocate; and (2) how IPV-specific medical mistrust modifies the association between IPV and PrEP communication. METHODS: Data were from 2 studies conducted in Connecticut and Baltimore, MD on adult women experiencing IPV (N = 272). Logistic regressions examined associations between IPV, PrEP communication, and IPV-specific medical mistrust. RESULTS: The average age was 25.7. The most common identity was non-Hispanic black (37.1%), followed by non-Hispanic white (33.8%), Hispanic (20.6%), and non-Hispanic another racial group (8.5%). Higher severity of psychological IPV was associated with more embarrassment to initiate a PrEP discussion with a health care provider (P = 0.009) or domestic violence advocate (P = 0.026). However, women with more severe psychological IPV were more willing to accept a PrEP recommendation from a health care provider (P = 0.033) or domestic violence advocate (P = 0.044). IPV-specific medical mistrust modified the association between physical IPV and willingness to accept a PrEP recommendation by a domestic violence advocate, such that women with physical IPV were significantly less likely to accept a PrEP recommendation by a domestic violence advocate, but only for women with high IPV-specific medical mistrust (P = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: PrEP initiation among women experiencing IPV may be strengthened by addressing and dismantling systems that perpetuate IPV-specific medical mistrust and stigma against IPV survivors.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Violencia de Pareja , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición , Adulto , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Humanos , Violencia de Pareja/psicología , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición/métodos , Conducta Sexual , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Confianza
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