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1.
Health Lit Res Pract ; 8(1): e38-e46, 2024 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38466224

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Research suggests that younger adult African American people (age 18-35 years) have more than double the risk of having a stroke than White people. Stroke risk education is lacking for this cohort; there is a dearth of materials that are targeted and focused for young adult African Americans. There is also little research on developing and testing age and culturally appropriate health literate materials that may help this population better understand personal risk factors for stroke. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to understand factors to guide creating and disseminating plain language health messages about stroke risk awareness among young adult African Americans. METHODS: African American participants age 18 years and older completed an online survey (N = 413). Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, and two-step cluster analyses were used to evaluate stroke risk awareness, perceived risk of stroke, message creation factors, and online health information seeking behavior. Open-ended survey items described modifiable and non-modifiable reasons for perceived risk of stroke. KEY RESULTS: Participants reported differences on overall stroke risk factor awareness by perceived risk of stroke was significant (F[2, 409] = 4.91, p = .008) with the very low/low group (M = 1.66, p < .01), showing significantly lower overall stroke risk factor awareness compared to the moderate and high/very high groups. Both respondents who thought their stroke risk was very low/low and moderate/high/very high commented about family history (54.1% and 45.9%, respectively) as the reason and 88.2% of very low/low commented that they did not have risk factors for stroke because they were young. Cluster analysis indicated the Mostly Clear Preferences cluster was more likely to select mostly/very on positive, informational, and long-term messages and medical authority sources. The largest of three clusters reported medical sources as the highest rated source for both finding and trusting health information (47.2%, n = 195). CONCLUSION: Young adult African Americans have a scarce understanding of modifiable stroke risk factors; health education materials should focus on positive information messaging that shows a long-term result and is presented by a medical authority. We did not observe any age or sex differences among the data, which suggests different message modalities may not be needed. [HLRP: Health Literacy Research and Practice. 2024;8(1):e38-e46.].


PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY: In this study, we collected data to create a targeted stroke risk awareness health education video for young African American adults (age 18 years and older). The video was based on analysis of data from 413 participants focusing on perception of stroke risk, stroke risk knowledge, as well as preference for message type, source credibility, and modality.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Accidente Cerebrovascular , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Adulto Joven , Adolescente , Adulto , Pueblo Africano , Análisis por Conglomerados , Factores de Riesgo , Accidente Cerebrovascular/epidemiología
2.
J Prof Nurs ; 50: 35-42, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38369369

RESUMEN

The intricacies of the unique educational and leadership development trajectories of Black PhD-prepared nurse scientists are largely invisible in nursing faculty development literature. A broadened understanding of nursing leadership development and science mentorship can facilitate support for the next generation of Black nurse scientists. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) can serve as formative launch pads for nurse scientist development. However, the role of HBCUs and strategies for supporting robust educational and mentor/training opportunities for Black PhD-prepared nurse scientists require thoughtful description and application. Incorporating an intrapersonal, interpersonal, and integrative leadership framework, we describe and synthesize four Black nurse scientists and HBCU graduates' experiences to highlight early science mentorship and leadership resilience through the excellent educational foundations provided at HBCUs.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Docentes de Enfermería , Liderazgo , Universidades , Humanos , Mentores
3.
Brain Imaging Behav ; 2024 Feb 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38340285

RESUMEN

While one can characterize mental health using questionnaires, such tools do not provide direct insight into the underlying biology. By linking approaches that visualize brain activity to questionnaires in the context of individualized prediction, we can gain new insights into the biology and behavioral aspects of brain health. Resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) can be used to identify biomarkers of these conditions and study patterns of abnormal connectivity. In this work, we estimate mental health quality for individual participants using static functional network connectivity (sFNC) data from rs-fMRI. The deep learning model uses the sFNC data as input to predict four categories of mental health quality and visualize the neural patterns indicative of each group. We used guided gradient class activation maps (guided Grad-CAM) to identify the most discriminative sFNC patterns. The effectiveness of this model was validated using the UK Biobank dataset, in which we showed that our approach outperformed four alternative models by 4-18% accuracy. The proposed model's performance evaluation yielded a classification accuracy of 76%, 78%, 88%, and 98% for the excellent, good, fair, and poor mental health categories, with poor mental health accuracy being the highest. The findings show distinct sFNC patterns across each group. The patterns associated with excellent mental health consist of the cerebellar-subcortical regions, whereas the most prominent areas in the poor mental health category are in the sensorimotor and visual domains. Thus the combination of rs-fMRI and deep learning opens a promising path for developing a comprehensive framework to evaluate and measure mental health. Moreover, this approach had the potential to guide the development of personalized interventions and enable the monitoring of treatment response. Overall this highlights the crucial role of advanced imaging modalities and deep learning algorithms in advancing our understanding and management of mental health.

4.
J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 39(2): E29-E35, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37052604

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: African American (AA) men bear a disproportionate burden of cardiovascular disease and stroke but are often underrepresented in research. OBJECTIVE: This article describes the development and evaluation of a recruitment plan to reach young AA men for the Stroke Counseling for Risk Reduction in Men project. METHODS: The plan was developed from researchers' previous experiences and a literature review, and used to recruit AA men, ages 20 to 35 years, for focus groups about stroke and Stroke Counseling for Risk Reduction. RESULTS: Screening survey respondents (N = 81) were reached mostly by word of mouth (42%) and social media (28%). Focus group participants (N = 32) recommended appropriate incentives and social media to recruit young AA men for research. They also suggested learning about the study from a friend, colleague, or study participant could motivate participation. CONCLUSION: The plan was successful in reaching and enrolling an adequate sample. Findings and recommendations highlight the importance of social networks and trusted sources.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Selección de Paciente , Accidente Cerebrovascular , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Focales , Motivación , Accidente Cerebrovascular/prevención & control , Adulto Joven , Adulto
5.
Arch Rehabil Res Clin Transl ; 5(2): 100261, 2023 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37312985

RESUMEN

Objective: To develop a remote protocol for the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (reFMA) and assess the reliability and validity with in-person delivery. Design: Feasibility testing. Setting: Remote/virtual and in-person in participants' homes. Participants: Three triads of therapists, stroke survivors, and carepartners (N=9) participated in Phases 1 and 2. Twelve different stroke survivors participated in Phase 3. Intervention: The FMA was administered and received remotely using the instructional protocol (Phases 1 and 2). Pilot testing with the delivery of the reFMA remotely and the FMA in-person occurred in Phase 3. Main Outcome Measures: Feedback for refinement and feasibility of obtaining the reFMA (including the System Usability Scale) and the FMA scores remotely and in-person to assess reliability and validity of the reFMA. Results: The reFMA was refined to incorporate feedback and suggestions from users. Interrater reliability between 2 therapists evaluating the FMA remotely was found to be poor with little agreement. For criterion validity, only 1 out of 12 (8.3%) total scores were in agreement between the in-person and remote assessments. Conclusion: Reliable and valid remote administration of the FMA is an important aspect of telerehabilitation for the upper extremity after stroke, but further research is needed to address current protocol limitations. This study provides preliminary support for the need for alternative strategies to improve appropriate implementation of the FMA remotely. Possible explanations for the poor reliability are explored and suggestions for improvement of the remote delivery of the FMA are provided.

6.
Transgend Health ; 8(3): 282-292, 2023 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37342482

RESUMEN

Purpose: Tobacco use is prevalent among sexual and gender minorities (SGM), yet few studies have examined the specific drivers of tobacco use among trans women. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of proximal, distal, and structural stressors associated with tobacco use among trans women. Methods: This study is based on a cross-sectional sample of trans women (n=162) living in Chicago and Atlanta. Analyses were conducted to examine the association between stressors, protective factors, and tobacco use using a structural equation modeling framework. Proximal stressors (transgender roles scale, transgender congruence scale, internalized stigma, and internalized moral acceptability) were operationalized as a higher order latent factor, while distal stressors were operationalized as observed variables (discrimination, intimate partner violence, sex work, rape, child sexual abuse, HIV, and violence). Protective factors included social support, trans-related family support, and trans-related peer support. All analyses adjusted for sociodemographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, education, homelessness and health insurance). Results: The prevalence of smoking among trans women in this study was 42.9%. In the final model, homelessness (odds ratio [OR]: 3.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.97, 7.25), intimate partner violence (OR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.07, 4.28), and commercial sex work (OR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 4.56) were all associated with tobacco use. There was no association between proximal stressors and tobacco use. Conclusion: Among trans women, tobacco use prevalence was high. Tobacco use was associated with homelessness, intimate partner violence, and commercial sex work. Targeted tobacco cessation programs should account for the co-occurring stressors that trans women face.

7.
J Pediatr Health Care ; 37(5): 570-574, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37354156

RESUMEN

Authors submitting a paper often receive an opportunity to revise and resubmit the paper. Authors may find addressing reviewers' comments challenging. We posit authors should welcome expert suggestions for revisions that strengthen the paper and develop a persuasive response if they disagree with the reviewer. A thoughtful, detailed response allows authors to dialogue with reviewers. Our paper uses exemplars of responses to reviewers to illustrate the effectiveness of clear and compelling author responses. Addressing reviewers' comments ultimately results in a better paper-more likely to be accepted. Developing skills in resubmitting research and clinical scholarship reports is essential to the dissemination process.


Asunto(s)
Edición , Escritura , Humanos , Revisión de la Investigación por Pares
8.
Nurs Res ; 72(2): 83-92, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36729696

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: African Americans have a higher incidence of early-onset stroke and poorer stroke-related outcomes than other race/ethnic groups. OBJECTIVES: Our two-arm, randomized controlled trial was implemented to assess efficacy of the nurse-led Stroke Counseling for Risk Reduction (SCORRE) intervention in reducing stroke risk in young African American adults by improving accuracy of perceived stroke risk and lifestyle behaviors (i.e., diet, physical activity, and smoking cessation). Stroke knowledge, behavior change readiness, and perceived competence to live a healthy lifestyle were also explored as secondary outcomes. METHODS: African Americans aged 20-35 years, recruited from an urban university and surrounding community, were randomized to SCORRE or an attention placebo control group receiving safe sex education. Data were collected pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and at 8 weeks. Multilevel models were used for primary outcome analyses. RESULTS: Participants ( n = 106) were mostly in their mid-20s, female, college students, and averaged about three modifiable stroke risk factors. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group had, on average, a significant increase in accuracy of perceived stroke risk post-intervention, a greater change in perceived competence to live healthy, and a greater increase in dietary components at 8 weeks. Significant changes were not found in physical activity and other outcomes. DISCUSSION: These findings suggest that SCORRE is a promising intervention to reduce stroke risk among young African American adults. Results will inform a more robust, randomized controlled trial of SCORRE to have an age, culture, and gender-focused intervention that effectively reduces stroke risk among African Americans early in life.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Accidente Cerebrovascular , Humanos , Femenino , Adulto Joven , Ejercicio Físico , Estilo de Vida , Accidente Cerebrovascular/prevención & control , Consejo
9.
Health Promot Pract ; : 15248399221118394, 2022 Oct 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36189723

RESUMEN

African American (AA) churches are valuable partners in implementing health promotion programming (HPP) to combat health disparities. The study purpose was to evaluate AA church characteristics associated with enrollment into the FAITH! (Fostering African American Improvement in Total Health) Trial, a community-based, cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a mobile health intervention for cardiovascular health promotion among AA churches. Churches located in Minneapolis-St. Paul and Rochester, Minnesota were invited to complete an electronic screening survey and follow-up telephone interview including the PREACH (Predicting Readiness to Engage African American Churches in Health) tool to assess church characteristics and infrastructure for HPP. The primary outcome was church enrollment in the FAITH! Trial. Key predictors included overall PREACH scores and its subscales (Personnel, Physical Structure, Faith-based Approach, Funding), congregation size, and mean congregation member age. Of the 26 churches screened, 16 (61.5%) enrolled in the trial. The enrolled churches had higher overall mean PREACH scores (36.1 vs. 30.2) and subscales for Personnel (8.8 vs. 5.6), Faith-based Approach (11.0 vs. 9.6), and Funding (7.3 vs. 4.8) compared with non-enrolled churches; all differences were not statistically significant due to small sample size. Twelve (75.0%) of the enrolled churches had >75 members versus six (60.0%) of the non-enrolled churches. Twelve (80.0%) of the enrolled churches had an average congregation member age ≤54 years versus six (67.0%) of the non-enrolled churches. AA churches enrolling into a community-based RCT reported greater infrastructure for HPP, larger congregations, and members of younger age. These characteristics may be helpful to consider among researchers partnering with AA churches for HPP studies.

10.
Circulation ; 146(12): e173-e184, 2022 09 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35979825

RESUMEN

Symptoms of cardiovascular disease drive health care use and are a major contributor to quality of life. Symptoms are of fundamental significance not only to the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and appraisal of response to medical therapy but also directly to patients' daily lives. The primary purpose of this scientific statement is to present the state of the science and relevance of symptoms associated with cardiovascular disease. Symptoms as patient-reported outcomes are reviewed in terms of the genesis, manifestation, and similarities or differences between diagnoses. Specifically, symptoms associated with acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, valvular disorders, stroke, rhythm disorders, and peripheral vascular disease are reviewed. Secondary aims include (1) describing symptom measurement methods in research and application in clinical practice and (2) describing the importance of cardiovascular disease symptoms in terms of clinical events and other patient-reported outcomes as applicable.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades Cardiovasculares , Cardiopatías , Accidente Cerebrovascular , American Heart Association , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/epidemiología , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/terapia , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Accidente Cerebrovascular/diagnóstico , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35457369

RESUMEN

Black churches have traditionally been a haven for Black American families; however, many churches do not currently have programs to support families living with dementia. Alter™ was established to assist faith communities in meeting the needs of these families and becoming a viable resource to promote their health and wellness. Alter™ achieves this aim through a three-pronged approach: (1) conducting educational sessions, (2) modifying Black churches to be dementia-inclusive spaces, and (3) providing ongoing support. The principal goal of Alter™ is to offer guidance to churches in adapting their community to reflect a supportive environment for families affected by dementia. Alter™ uses a partnership checklist to encourage activities that incorporate dementia education opportunities, environmental modifications, and dementia resources and support. This paper reports on a formative mixed-methods evaluation of church partners enrolled in Alter™. Church partner ambassadors within the faith communities participated in the evaluation survey (n = 8) and two focus groups (n = 11). Ambassadors are appointed by church leadership to lead the implementation of program activities. Data were collected concerning the levels of helpfulness, difficulty, usefulness, or utility of checklist activities and modifications and the ease of program implementation. The evaluation also assessed the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on each church's ability to implement activities and modifications. The survey results revealed that most required partnership activities and modifications were found to be at least moderately helpful. Some of the items (themes) that differed across church partners included barriers to implementing activities, the support provided and needed, and the use of program funding. This evaluation provides key insights to consider in developing and refining community-based, dementia-friendly communities (including faith communities). As implementation science expands and improves, the need to evaluate the implementation of programs continues to be highlighted. Our formative evaluation shed light on key areas in which modifications to our original programming would lead to program improvement and sustainability. Additionally, implementing the modifications identified in our evaluation will facilitate the achievement of the mission of Alter™ to improve the well-being of older adults affected by dementia and their families. Other programs would reap substantial benefits from engaging in similar formative evaluation efforts.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Demencia , Negro o Afroamericano , Anciano , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos , Pandemias
13.
Matern Child Health J ; 26(4): 788-795, 2022 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34817760

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Racial identity, which is the degree that individuals define themselves regarding their racial group membership, may influence the mental well-being of Black adults. To gain an understanding of the role Black racial identity may have on postpartum mental health, the researchers performed a secondary data analysis to examine the relationship between six Black racial identity clusters (Low Race Salience, Assimilated and Miseducated, Self-Hating, Anti-white, Multiculturalist, and Conflicted) and postpartum maternal functioning in Black women living in Georgia. METHODS: Black women completed Cross's Racial Identity Scale, the Barkin Index of Maternal Functioning, and demographic questionnaires online via Qualtrics®. PARTICIPANTS: A total sample of 116 self-identified Black postpartum women were included in the analysis. Women ranged in age from 18 to 41 years (M = 29.5 ± 5.3) and their infants were 1 to 12 months old (M = 5.6 ± 3.5). The majority of women were married/cohabitating with their partner (71%), had a college degree (53%), and employed (69%). RESULTS: It was determined through Kruskal Wallis test, χ2(5) = 20.108, p < 0.05, that the women belonging to the Assimilated and Miseducated cluster had higher levels of maternal functioning when compared to the women in the Self-Hating and Anti-white clusters. CONCLUSION: This study is novel in its exploration of the relationship between Black racial identities and postpartum maternal functioning. Findings support the need for further research with larger sample and cluster sizes to determine the relationship between racial identity and maternal functioning.


Asunto(s)
Población Negra , Periodo Posparto , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Salud Mental , Periodo Posparto/psicología , Grupos Raciales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
14.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(1): 72-80, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34860803

RESUMEN

Dementia is a stigmatizing condition requiring enhanced awareness and understanding. Churches are a trusted source of support for African Americans, a demographic disproportionately affected by dementia. However, many African American churches are not equipped with the knowledge and means to provide safe environments, resources, and spiritual and social support for their parishioners living with dementia and their families. This protocol is written to detail the design and implementation of a nurse-led, dementia-friendly congregation program, Alter. The Alter program was developed to increase dementia awareness, develop a supportive, faith-based dementia-friendly infrastructure, and create a community supporting the well-being of African Americans living with dementia and their families. Engagement in this program aims to improve brain health status of older adults, improve physical and mental health outcomes, reduce dementia stigma, and enhance personal agency. Improved outcomes for persons living with dementia translate into lower use of acute and emergency services due to more stability in community care. It is expected that the churches participating in this program will be recognized by their community as a great resource for dementia information and support. The long-term goal of the Alter program is to be widely adapted in various health systems to reduce health disparities associated with dementia in the African American community.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Demencia , Anciano , Humanos , Rol de la Enfermera , Apoyo Social
15.
Nurs Outlook ; 70(1): 119-126, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34627614

RESUMEN

The pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism highlighted health inequities that have existed for decades among Black communities. Nurses are positioned to address these health inequities through innovative ideas and research. More specifically, Black nurses, because of their shared lived experience, understand sociostructural factors underpinning health inequities and how to best engage with Black communities. However, only 8% of Black nurses make up the overall nursing workforce and far fewer are nurse scientists. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) can offer critically important options for success in addressing the dearth of Black nurse scientists working across sectors and contributing to rich academic milieu, informing innovative national policy, and creating impactful practice. We discuss challenges and strategies to promoting research careers at HBCUs to attract Black nurse scientists as the next leaders in health inequities research.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Educación en Enfermería , Personal de Laboratorio/provisión & distribución , Liderazgo , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/provisión & distribución , Universidades , Investigación Biomédica , COVID-19 , Humanos , Racismo
16.
Inquiry ; 58: 469580211062438, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34914563

RESUMEN

To examine whether rates of 30-day readmission after acute ischemic stroke changed differentially between Medicaid expansion and non-expansion states, and whether race/ethnicity moderated this change, we conducted a difference-in-differences analysis using 6 state inpatient databases (AR, FL, GA, MD, NM, and WA) from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Analysis included all patients aged 19-64 hospitalized in 2012-2015 with a principal diagnosis of ischemic stroke and a primary payer of Medicaid, self-pay, or no charge, who resided in the state where admitted and were discharged alive (N=28 330). No association was detected between Medicaid expansion and readmission overall, but there was evidence of moderation by race/ethnicity. The predicted probability of all-cause readmission among non-Hispanic White patients rose an estimated 2.6 percentage points (or 39%) in expansion states but not in non-expansion states, whereas it increased by 1.5 percentage points (or 23%) for non-White and Hispanic patients in non-expansion states. Therefore, Medicaid expansion was associated with a rise in readmission probability that was 4.0 percentage points higher for non-Hispanic Whites compared to other racial/ethnic groups, after adjustment for covariates. Similar trends were observed when unplanned and potentially preventable readmissions were isolated. Among low-income stroke survivors, we found evidence that 2 years of Medicaid expansion promoted rehospitalization, but only for White patients. Future studies should verify these findings over a longer follow-up period.


Asunto(s)
Isquemia Encefálica , Accidente Cerebrovascular Isquémico , Accidente Cerebrovascular , Humanos , Medicaid , Readmisión del Paciente , Accidente Cerebrovascular/terapia , Estados Unidos
17.
J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc ; 27(4): 292-305, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33769104

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study examined the relationship between racial identity clusters and postpartum depressive symptoms (PPDS) in Black postpartum mothers living in Georgia. AIMS: A cross-sectional study design using Cross's nigrescence theory as a framework was used to explore the relationship between Black racial identity and PPDS. METHOD: Black mothers were administered online questionnaires via Qualtrics. A total sample of 116 self-identified Black mothers were enrolled in the study. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 41 years (M = 29.5 ± 5.3) and their infants were 1 to 12 months old (M = 5.6 ± 3.5). The majority of mothers were married or cohabitating with their partner (71%), had a college degree (53%), and worked full-time (57%). RESULTS: Hierarchical cluster analysis identified six racial identity clusters within the sample: Assimilated and Miseducated, Self-Hating, Anti-White, Multiculturalist, Low Race Salience, and Conflicted. A Kruskal-Wallis H test determined there was no difference in PPDS scores between racial identity clusters. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to explore the relationship between Black racial identity clusters of postpartum mothers and their mental health. Findings emphasize the complexity of Black racial identity and suggest that the current assessment tools may not adequately detect PPDS in Black mothers. The implications for these findings in nursing practice and future research are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Depresión Posparto , Depresión , Adolescente , Adulto , Negro o Afroamericano , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Periodo Posparto , Adulto Joven
18.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(11): 1511-1516, 2021 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33487058

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions and attitudes of African American congregants toward dementia before and after attending a dementia-focused workshop. Six churches in Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, hosted the workshops. Attendees (N = 171) participated in a free association exercise to evaluate their perceptions and attitudes toward dementia. Before and after the workshop, participants wrote words and phrases that occurred to them when they thought of dementia. Content analysis was used to identify themes. Before the workshop, participants' responses tended to include negative language (e.g., fear, memory loss, sadness). After the workshop, participants expressed more positive words (e.g., support, hopefulness, caring). These findings suggest that education can change congregants' perceptions about dementia and potentially reduce dementia-associated stigma. This change will allow families to feel comfortable both interacting with and seeking help from those in their faith communities.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Demencia , Actitud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Percepción , Religión , Estigma Social
19.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(5): 249-255, 2020 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32352538

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Missing data are an inevitable reality in research. Nurse educators can promote proactive thinking about this topic to help avoid excessive missingness. The purpose of this article is to encourage nurses to view missing data as an accepted reality and to consider strategies for anticipating and minimizing missing data throughout the research process. METHOD: The common causes of missing data and ways to minimize their occurrence are discussed, along with suggestions for adopting a statistical mindset about missing data. Rubin's framework for missingness as a random process, modern statistical methods for analyzing missing data, and recommendations for reporting also are discussed. CONCLUSION: Nurse educators and researchers should understand all aspects of missing data, including the types, occurrence, causes, potential problems, and strategies for preventing, handling, and reporting missing data. By doing so, the occurrence of missing data can be lessened, thereby minimizing various problems that can result. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(5):249-255.].


Asunto(s)
Investigación en Enfermería/organización & administración , Proyectos de Investigación , Humanos
20.
J Nurs Scholarsh ; 51(6): 717-726, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31697044

RESUMEN

Nurse scientists play an indispensable role in developing new knowledge to advance the health of patients, families, and communities. Yet PhD nurse enrollment has significantly dropped, and many later career nurse scientists are nearing retirement. The purpose of this article is to outline potential strategies to enhance the PhD nurse pipeline. Potential strategies are identified at three distinct time points along the PhD trajectory: (a) prior to a PhD program (increasing the pipeline), (b) during a PhD program (enhancing graduation rates and transitioning into research-focused careers), and (c) in the postdoctoral or early career period (establishing scholarly independence and an active program of research). Talented students should be approached early on in their education to ascertain interest in a scientific research-based career, and all students could be engaged in research opportunities while in undergraduate programs. During a PhD program, supportive mentors are a key component for student success and may provide assistance in obtaining ongoing funding and scholarship support. Throughout doctoral study and into early career, less structured opportunities can be influential, including conference support, online and face-to-face training, and ongoing funding and scholarship support for postdoctoral study or fellowships. At each career stage, there should be a focus on designing scientifically sound nursing research that will impact outcomes in measurable and sustainable ways. We must not focus our attention only on student recruitment. Public messaging efforts are needed to raise awareness of the role of nurse researchers. In addition, several stakeholders play a role in increasing the PhD pipeline and producing independent nurse scientists, and they should be acknowledged in these efforts. The strategies described may be beneficial for any nurse contemplating a research career as well as for those who may serve as mentors to these individuals. More broadly, these strategies may be employed by colleges and universities, funding bodies, professional nursing societies, and healthcare organizations in the United States and abroad. Increasing the PhD pipeline, and fostering a more robust field of independent nurse scientists, will translate into improved patient outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/organización & administración , Becas/organización & administración , Investigadores/organización & administración , Recursos en Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Mentores , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería/organización & administración , Selección de Personal/organización & administración
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