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1.
Science ; 375(6579): 430-433, 2022 01 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35084955

RESUMEN

In thermodynamic equilibrium, current in metallic systems is carried by electronic states near the Fermi energy, whereas the filled bands underneath contribute little to conduction. Here, we describe a very different regime in which carrier distribution in graphene and its superlattices is shifted so far from equilibrium that the filled bands start playing an essential role, leading to a critical-current behavior. The criticalities develop upon the velocity of electron flow reaching the Fermi velocity. Key signatures of the out-of-equilibrium state are current-voltage characteristics that resemble those of superconductors, sharp peaks in differential resistance, sign reversal of the Hall effect, and a marked anomaly caused by the Schwinger-like production of hot electron-hole plasma. The observed behavior is expected to be common to all graphene-based superlattices.

2.
Phys Rev Lett ; 127(5): 056802, 2021 Jul 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34397232

RESUMEN

Twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) provides an example of a system in which the interplay of interlayer interactions and superlattice structure impacts electron transport in a variety of nontrivial ways and gives rise to a plethora of interesting effects. Understanding the mechanisms of electron scattering in TBG has, however, proven challenging, raising many questions about the origins of resistivity in this system. Here we show that TBG exhibits high-temperature magneto-oscillations originating from the scattering of charge carriers between TBG minivalleys. The amplitude of these oscillations reveals that interminivalley scattering is strong, and its characteristic timescale is comparable to that of its intraminivalley counterpart. Furthermore, by exploring the temperature dependence of these oscillations, we estimate the electron-electron collision rate in TBG and find that it exceeds that of monolayer graphene. Our study demonstrates the consequences of the relatively small size of the superlattice Brillouin zone and Fermi velocity reduction on lateral transport in TBG.

3.
Nature ; 594(7864): 513-516, 2021 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34163054

RESUMEN

Dragging of light by moving media was predicted by Fresnel1 and verified by Fizeau's celebrated experiments2 with flowing water. This momentous discovery is among the experimental cornerstones of Einstein's special relativity theory and is well understood3,4 in the context of relativistic kinematics. By contrast, experiments on dragging photons by an electron flow in solids are riddled with inconsistencies and have so far eluded agreement with the theory5-7. Here we report on the electron flow dragging surface plasmon polaritons8,9 (SPPs): hybrid quasiparticles of infrared photons and electrons in graphene. The drag is visualized directly through infrared nano-imaging of propagating plasmonic waves in the presence of a high-density current. The polaritons in graphene shorten their wavelength when propagating against the drifting carriers. Unlike the Fizeau effect for light, the SPP drag by electrical currents defies explanation by simple kinematics and is linked to the nonlinear electrodynamics of Dirac electrons in graphene. The observed plasmonic Fizeau drag enables breaking of time-reversal symmetry and reciprocity10 at infrared frequencies without resorting to magnetic fields11,12 or chiral optical pumping13,14. The Fizeau drag also provides a tool with which to study interactions and nonequilibrium effects in electron liquids.

4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 543, 2021 Jan 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33483488

RESUMEN

The rectification of electromagnetic waves to direct currents is a crucial process for energy harvesting, beyond-5G wireless communications, ultra-fast science, and observational astronomy. As the radiation frequency is raised to the sub-terahertz (THz) domain, ac-to-dc conversion by conventional electronics becomes challenging and requires alternative rectification protocols. Here, we address this challenge by tunnel field-effect transistors made of bilayer graphene (BLG). Taking advantage of BLG's electrically tunable band structure, we create a lateral tunnel junction and couple it to an antenna exposed to THz radiation. The incoming radiation is then down-converted by the tunnel junction nonlinearity, resulting in high responsivity (>4 kV/W) and low-noise (0.2 pW/[Formula: see text]) detection. We demonstrate how switching from intraband Ohmic to interband tunneling regime can raise detectors' responsivity by few orders of magnitude, in agreement with the developed theory. Our work demonstrates a potential application of tunnel transistors for THz detection and reveals BLG as a promising platform therefor.

5.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 4008, 2019 Sep 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31488842

RESUMEN

At very small twist angles of ∼0.1°, bilayer graphene exhibits a strain-accompanied lattice reconstruction that results in submicron-size triangular domains with the standard, Bernal stacking. If the interlayer bias is applied to open an energy gap inside the domain regions making them insulating, such marginally twisted bilayer graphene is expected to remain conductive due to a triangular network of chiral one-dimensional states hosted by domain boundaries. Here we study electron transport through this helical network and report giant Aharonov-Bohm oscillations that reach in amplitude up to 50% of resistivity and persist to temperatures above 100 K. At liquid helium temperatures, the network exhibits another kind of oscillations that appear as a function of carrier density and are accompanied by a sign-changing Hall effect. The latter are attributed to consecutive population of the narrow minibands formed by the network of one-dimensional states inside the gap.

6.
Science ; 364(6436): 162-165, 2019 04 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30819929

RESUMEN

An electrical conductor subjected to a magnetic field exhibits the Hall effect in the presence of current flow. Here, we report a qualitative deviation from the standard behavior in electron systems with high viscosity. We found that the viscous electron fluid in graphene responds to nonquantizing magnetic fields by producing an electric field opposite to that generated by the ordinary Hall effect. The viscous contribution is substantial and identified by studying local voltages that arise in the vicinity of current-injecting contacts. We analyzed the anomaly over a wide range of temperatures and carrier densities and extracted the Hall viscosity, a dissipationless transport coefficient that was long identified theoretically but remained elusive in experiments.

7.
Science ; 357(6347): 181-184, 2017 07 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28706067

RESUMEN

Cyclotron motion of charge carriers in metals and semiconductors leads to Landau quantization and magneto-oscillatory behavior in their properties. Cryogenic temperatures are usually required to observe these oscillations. We show that graphene superlattices support a different type of quantum oscillation that does not rely on Landau quantization. The oscillations are extremely robust and persist well above room temperature in magnetic fields of only a few tesla. We attribute this phenomenon to repetitive changes in the electronic structure of superlattices such that charge carriers experience effectively no magnetic field at simple fractions of the flux quantum per superlattice unit cell. Our work hints at unexplored physics in Hofstadter butterfly systems at high temperatures.

8.
Nat Commun ; 8: 14552, 2017 02 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28211517

RESUMEN

An energy gap can be opened in the spectrum of graphene reaching values as large as 0.2 eV in the case of bilayers. However, such gaps rarely lead to the highly insulating state expected at low temperatures. This long-standing puzzle is usually explained by charge inhomogeneity. Here we revisit the issue by investigating proximity-induced superconductivity in gapped graphene and comparing normal-state measurements in the Hall bar and Corbino geometries. We find that the supercurrent at the charge neutrality point in gapped graphene propagates along narrow channels near the edges. This observation is corroborated by using the edgeless Corbino geometry in which case resistivity at the neutrality point increases exponentially with increasing the gap, as expected for an ordinary semiconductor. In contrast, resistivity in the Hall bar geometry saturates to values of about a few resistance quanta. We attribute the metallic-like edge conductance to a nontrivial topology of gapped Dirac spectra.

9.
Science ; 351(6277): 1055-8, 2016 Mar 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26912363

RESUMEN

Graphene hosts a unique electron system in which electron-phonon scattering is extremely weak but electron-electron collisions are sufficiently frequent to provide local equilibrium above the temperature of liquid nitrogen. Under these conditions, electrons can behave as a viscous liquid and exhibit hydrodynamic phenomena similar to classical liquids. Here we report strong evidence for this transport regime. We found that doped graphene exhibits an anomalous (negative) voltage drop near current-injection contacts, which is attributed to the formation of submicrometer-size whirlpools in the electron flow. The viscosity of graphene's electron liquid is found to be ~0.1 square meters per second, an order of magnitude higher than that of honey, in agreement with many-body theory. Our work demonstrates the possibility of studying electron hydrodynamics using high-quality graphene.

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