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1.
Quintessence Int ; 52(2): 132-137, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33433079

RESUMEN

The extraction of a tooth with root resorption can be a complicated procedure and can result in the removal of a significant amount of alveolar bone. In the anterior maxilla, esthetic rehabilitation of damaged sites with implant-supported crown could require multiple surgeries. Patients often ask for an alternative, and minimally invasive treatments are generally preferred. In this paper, a clinical case of implant-supported crown in a site affected by root resorption is described. Immediate implant was placed leaving some root fragments in the osteotomy site, thus avoiding invasive extractive surgeries. A minimally invasive flapless technique with a computer-guided implant placement procedure was used. After ?8 years, clinical and radiologic data were stable, gingival tissues around the implant appeared healthy, no dark translucency appeared through marginal gingiva around the implant, and there was no pathologic probing pocket depth ?or bleeding on probing. In the presence of root resorption and ankylosis, computer-guided surgery could be helpful to prepare a precise implant site through various tissues, such as partially resorbed root remnants. (Quintessence Int 2021;52:132-137; doi: 10.3290/j.qi.a45432).


Asunto(s)
Implantes Dentales de Diente Único , Implantes Dentales , Carga Inmediata del Implante Dental , Computadores , Coronas , Implantación Dental Endoósea , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Estética Dental , Humanos , Maxilar/cirugía , Extracción Dental , Resultado del Tratamiento
2.
Quintessence Int ; : 2-7, 2020 Oct 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33118005

RESUMEN

The extraction of a tooth with root resorption can be a complicated procedure and can result in the removal of a significant amount of alveolar bone. In the anterior maxilla, esthetic rehabilitation of damaged sites with implant-supported crown could require multiple surgeries. Patients often ask for an alternative, and minimally invasive treatments are generally preferred. In this paper, a clinical case of implant-supported crown in a site affected by root resorption is described. Immediate implant was placed leaving some root fragments in the osteotomy site, thus avoiding invasive extractive surgeries. A minimally invasive flapless technique with a computer-guided implant placement procedure was used. After 8 years, clinical and radiologic data were stable, gingival tissues around the implant appeared healthy, no dark translucency appeared through marginal gingiva around the implant, and there was no pathologic probing pocket depth or bleeding on probing. In the presence of root resorption and ankylosis, computer-guided surgery could be helpful to prepare a precise implant site through various tissues, such as partially resorbed root remnants.

3.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants ; 35(4): 841-849, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32724939

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This nonrandomized, retrospective multicenter study aimed to evaluate success rates, peri-implant marginal bone loss, and clinical parameters around single implants with and without laser-microgrooved collars placed and loaded using different protocols after 7 to 10 years of function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A chart review was used to select patients treated at five private dental clinics with single dental implants with and without laser-microgrooved collars. Cumulative success rates, peri-implant marginal bone loss, probing depth, Plaque Index, bleeding on probing, and gingival recession were recorded at baseline examinations (ie, definitive restoration delivery) and at each year during the follow-up period. RESULTS: Three hundred single implants (140 without laser-microgrooved collars and 160 with 1.7-mm laser-microgrooved collars) in 300 patients were selected. At the completion of the study period, 26 patients and 26 implants (17 with and 9 without a laser-microgrooved collar) were classified as "dropouts." Implants and restorations were categorized into two subgroups each for a total of four study groups: group 1, immediate implant placement; group 2, delayed implant placement; group 3, immediate nonocclusal loading of prostheses; and group 4, delayed loading of prostheses. Nineteen implants (6.9%) failed clinically (4 [2.7%] with and 15 [11.4%] without a laser-microgrooved collar). The difference in cumulative success rates was statistically significant (P < .05). Radiographically, at the end of the follow-up period, the laser-microgrooved group showed a mean peri-implant marginal bone loss of 0.64 mm compared with 1.82 mm for the non-laser-microgrooved group. At the same time point, a mean probing depth of 0.76 mm was observed for the laser-microgrooved group compared with 2.75 mm for the non-laser-microgrooved group. A statistically significant difference in peri-implant marginal bone loss and probing depth between the two types of implant collars was evident (P < .05). No statistically significant correlation was noted between the types of implant placement/prosthetic restoration and clinical parameters. CONCLUSION: Implants with a laser-microgrooved collar appear to influence the peri-implant soft and hard tissue stability, reducing the probing depth levels and the peri-implant marginal bone loss by more than 50% after 10 years of function, regardless of the type of implant placement and loading protocol.


Asunto(s)
Pérdida de Hueso Alveolar , Implantes Dentales , Recesión Gingival , Carga Inmediata del Implante Dental , Implantación Dental Endoósea , Índice de Placa Dental , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
4.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 78(2): 217-227, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31518549

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: We aimed to retrospectively evaluate the radiographic and clinical results and the success rate of short implants with a laser-microgrooved collar (≤7.5 mm) placed in the posterior areas after up to 3 to 5 years of function and the possible influence of several variables-such as gender, periodontitis, smoking habit, location, implant stability at placement, and prosthetic fixation design-on implant marginal bone loss (MBL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A chart review was used for this multicenter study, which involved 5 private dental clinics. All patients had been treated with short dental implants with a laser-microgrooved collar from January 2012 to December 2015. RESULTS: A total of 174 patients (99 male and 75 female patients; mean age, 51.6 ± 2.8 years) with 254 implants were evaluated. Seven short implants failed. The cumulative success rate was 97.2%, without a statistically significant difference between implants placed in the posterior maxilla and mandible. The mean MBL was 0.18 ± 0.7 mm at the mesial aspect and 0.19 ± 0.6 mm at the distal aspect. No statistical relationships were found between MBL and gender, periodontitis, smoking habit, location, implant stability at placement, and prosthetic fixation design. CONCLUSIONS: At the end of the 3- to 5-year follow-up period, short implants with a laser-microgrooved collar (≤7.5 mm) in the posterior areas yielded a relatively high cumulative success rate. The laser-microgrooved collar implant maintained stable marginal bone levels. No investigated variable was statistically associated with MBL.


Asunto(s)
Pérdida de Hueso Alveolar , Implantes Dentales , Boca Edéntula , Implantación Dental Endoósea , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Fracaso de la Restauración Dental , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Rayos Láser , Masculino , Mandíbula , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos
5.
J Endod ; 44(11): 1616-1625.e9, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30241680

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Candida in endodontic infections has been investigated in a large number of studies, but its role as an endodontic pathogen is still debatable. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on the prevalence of Candida species in root canal infections. METHODS: Extensive literature research was performed in the most important electronic biomedical databases, and additional studies have been identified from references from relevant articles. Studies were critically appraised using a modified version of the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist. RESULTS: From 2225 unique records, 2118 were excluded on the basis of title and abstract. Of the remaining 107 studies, 50 were excluded after full-text review, and 57 were included for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The overall prevalence of Candida spp. in root canal infections was 8.20% (95% confidence interval, 5.56%-11.21%). Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species. Significant heterogeneity among studies was observed (P < .001, I2 = 86.07%). Subgroup analyses revealed a higher prevalence of Candida spp. from African samples. All studies considered, a high or unclear risk of bias was prevalent regarding 6 out of the 8 items considered in the critical appraisal. CONCLUSIONS: Candida spp. occurred in a small proportion of root canal infections. Further and better designed research is needed to investigate the real contribution of Candida spp. to the microbial ecology in infected root canals.


Asunto(s)
Candida/aislamiento & purificación , Candidiasis , Cavidad Pulpar , Periodontitis Periapical/epidemiología , Periodontitis Periapical/microbiología , Cavidad Pulpar/microbiología , Humanos , Prevalencia
6.
Dent Mater ; 18(8): 596-602, 2002 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-12385901

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Nowadays, the restoration of endodontically treated teeth is based on the use of materials with a modulus of elasticity similar to that of dentin (18.6 GPa). Fiber posts, resin cements and some composite resins all have this characteristic. This study evaluated the bond strength between luting materials, root dentin and fiber posts through push-out tests and examined the integration among these three components through scanning electron microscopy. METHODS: Endodontically treated extracted teeth and plastic plates were used to test the interface between luting agent and dentin and luting agent and post. RESULTS: Chemical affinity between different components (luting materials and fiber posts) is extremely important in achieving high bond strength. The bond strength tests and SEM observations showed that in vitro, composite resins perform better than resin cements. SIGNIFICANCE: The in vivo use of these materials may significantly reinforce residual tooth structure therefore reducing the risk for fracture and debonding.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas , Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Recubrimientos Dentinarios , Técnica de Perno Muñón , Cementos de Resina , Análisis de Varianza , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Elasticidad , Humanos , Ensayo de Materiales , Microscopía Electrónica de Rastreo , Estadísticas no Paramétricas
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