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1.
Diabetes Educ ; : 145721720907055, 2020 Mar 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32133921

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Peer-Mentor Support Scale (PMSS), a measure of peer-mentor support provided to parents of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to youths with T1D. METHODS: A multistage process was undertaken to include the following: item construction based on qualitive data from those who have experienced peer-mentor support, cognitive interviewing with parents and youths, content validity assessment, pilot testing of the scale, and psychometric evaluation of the PMSS with 165 participants. RESULTS: The final version of the PMSS included 17 items, scored on a 4-point Likert scale, with higher scores corresponding with greater peer-mentor support. The Cronbach's alpha was .85 (n = 165), and the intraclass correlation coefficient was .78 (n = 38). No significant relationship was found between the PMSS score and general social support, suggesting that peer-mentor support is distinct from general social support. Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was performed, indicating that the scale was unidimensional and explained 59.3% of the variance in peer-mentor support. CONCLUSION: The PMSS is a reliable and valid 17-item instrument that can be used to measure the unique contributions of peer mentorship for parents of children with T1DM and for youths with T1DM.

2.
Nurs Outlook ; 66(1): 77-83, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29291946

RESUMEN

Historically, research-focused doctoral programs in nursing have used the apprenticeship model to educate and prepare nurse scientists for research careers. The assumption is that students learn best when paired with a faculty member who is working on the same topic. This model works well when there is a stable workforce, adequate funding streams and sufficient faculty with diverse expertise to capture the enthusiasm and varied topics of incoming doctoral students. However, we believe there are alternative approaches that are worth exploring. We propose an alternative way of preparing students for entry into nursing science. The purpose of this paper is to describe one PhD program's new approach, based on the philosophical premises of Bernard Lonergan, to create a generation of creative, insightful thinkers who expand the horizons of the nursing discipline.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/organización & administración , Modelos Educacionales , Filosofía , Pensamiento , Curriculum , Docentes de Enfermería , Humanos , Massachusetts , Investigación en Enfermería , Teoría de Enfermería , Carga de Trabajo
3.
Chest ; 152(3): 547-562, 2017 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28684289

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that addressing anxiety and depressive mood disorders will improve chronic cough severity and cough quality of life (CQOL). METHODS: Major tenets of the theory of unpleasant symptoms were examined in a longitudinal observational study of consecutive adults with cough of > 8 weeks' duration treated in our cough clinic. At baseline and 3 and 6 months, subjects completed 3 Punum Ladders rating cough severity, the CQOL Questionnaire, the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales-21, and the Duke Functional Social Support Questionnaire. Cross-sectional baseline and longitudinal regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Eighty subjects (55 women) with a mean age of 58.5 ± 11.1 years and a cough duration of 86.0 ± 123.7 months were enrolled. At baseline, worse cough severity was significantly associated with less education and worse ability to speak bothered by cough and the urge to cough. Worse CQOL was significantly associated with worse depression symptoms, urinary incontinence, and ability to speak; use of self-prescribed remedies; and younger age. Significant improvements in depression and stress symptoms occurred at 3 and 6 months. Anxiety symptoms improved, particularly in the first 3 months. Improvement in cough severity was significantly associated with less education, male sex, and improvement in ability to speak and urge to cough. Improvement in CQOL was significantly associated with improvement in urinary incontinence, urge to cough, anxiety symptoms, and use of self-prescribed remedies. CONCLUSIONS: Using the theory of unpleasant symptoms, we have come to appreciate that managing psychological, physiological, and situational factors in addition to focusing on identifying the cause of cough is important to maximize improvement in CQOL.


Asunto(s)
Tos/fisiopatología , Tos/psicología , Conducta Social , Adulto , Anciano , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Enfermedad Crónica , Tos/complicaciones , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida , Análisis de Regresión , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
Nurs Res ; 66(1): 54-59, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27977568

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Measurement of intervention fidelity is an essential component of any scientifically sound intervention trial. However, few papers have proposed ways to integrate intervention fidelity data into the execution of these trials. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to describe the intervention fidelity process used in a randomized controlled trial of a human patient simulator intervention and how these data were used to monitor drift and provide feedback to improve the consistency of both intervention and control delivery over time in a multisite education intervention for parents of children with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Intervention fidelity was measured for both the intervention and control condition by direct observation, self-report of interventionist delivery, and parent participant receipt of educational information. Intervention fidelity data were analyzed after 50%, 75%, and 100% of the participants had been recruited and compared by group (treatment and control) and research site. RESULTS: The sample included 191 parents of young children newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Observations scores in both intervention and control groups indicated a high level of intervention fidelity. Treatment receipt was also high and did not differ by treatment group. The teaching session attendance rates by site and session were significantly different at Time Point 1 (50% enrollment); following study staff retraining and reinforcement, there were no significant differences at Time Point 3 (100% enrollment). IMPLICATIONS: Results demonstrate the importance of monitoring intervention fidelity in both the intervention and control condition over time and using these data to correct drift during the course of a multisite clinical trial.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Educación en Salud/métodos , Relaciones Padres-Hijo , Padres/educación , Adulto , Niño , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/psicología , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Padres/psicología , Calidad de Vida
5.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 111(8): 1177-86, 2016 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27296943

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis is a significant medical problem that impacts a large number of patients worldwide. In 2014, we developed a disease-specific instrument for the evaluation of quality of life in this group of patients: pancreatitis quality of life instrument (PANQOLI). The goal of this study was to evaluate its psychometric properties: its reliability and its construct validity. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional multi-center study that involved 12 pancreatic disease centers. Patients who met the inclusion/exclusion criteria for chronic pancreatitis were invited to participate. Those who accepted were asked to complete seven questionnaires/instruments. Only patients who completed the PANQOLI were included in the study. Its reliability and its construct validity were tested. RESULTS: A total of 159 patients completed the PANQOLI and were included in the study. They had a mean age of 49.03, 49% were male, and 84% were Caucasian. Six of the 24 items on the scale were removed because of lack of inter-item correlation, redundancy, or lack of correlation to quality of life issues. The final 18-item scale had excellent reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficient: 0.914) and excellent construct validity with good correlation to generic quality of life instruments (SF-12 and EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-PAN26) and lack of correlation to non-quality of life instruments (MAST and DAST). Through exploratory factor analysis, the PANQOLI was found to consist of four subscales: emotional function scale, role function scale, physical function scale, and "self-worth" scale. CONCLUSIONS: PANQOLI is the first disease-specific instrument to be developed and validated for the evaluation of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis patients. It has a unique subscale for "self-worth" that differentiates it from other generic instruments. Studies are currently under way to evaluate its use in other populations not included in this study.


Asunto(s)
Actividades Cotidianas , Pancreatitis Crónica/psicología , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Autoimagen , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Análisis Factorial , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pancreatitis Crónica/fisiopatología , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 18(1): 187-93, 2016 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25420781

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to describe HIV-testing attitudes, HIV related stigma and health care access in African-born men taking part in the African Health Cup (AHC), a soccer tournament held annually to improve HIV awareness and testing. Venue sampling was used to collect survey and qualitative interview data related to HIV-testing attitudes, stigma and experiences associated with the AHC. The sample included 135 survey respondents and 27 interview participants. AHC participants were successfully accessing health care services. Although the AHC was viewed positively, HIV testing rates remain low due to stigma and privacy concerns. This population continues to have misconceptions about HIV transmission and to use condoms inconsistently. The AHC is a successful intervention to engage African-born men in HIV awareness and education. More work is needed to enhance these AHC aspects and address stigma and privacy concerns related to using onsite health screenings. Continuing to develop novel strategies to educate African-born immigrants about HIV is urgently needed.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Infecciones por VIH/etnología , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/etnología , Estigma Social , Adulto , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Emigrantes e Inmigrantes/psicología , Infecciones por VIH/diagnóstico , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud/etnología , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Masculino , Estados Unidos
7.
Diabetes Educ ; 41(5): 537-49, 2015 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26246593

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes (PETS-D; clinical trial registration NCT01517269) for parents of children <13 years old newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with 3 parent education vignette sessions using human patient simulation (HPS) as compared with formal parent-nurse education sessions (vignette only) regarding diabetes knowledge, problem-solving skills, hypoglycemia fear, anxiety, and self-efficacy. DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects were randomized to the HPS parent diabetes education or the vignette-only arm. Using linear mixed modeling, we compared HPS and vignette-only groups at 2, 6, and 14 weeks. Effect modification of treatment by dichotomized child's age (<6 and ≥ 6 years old) and parent education (≤ high school and >high school) was also tested. All analyses were intent to treat and adjusted for baseline outcome level and clustering within site. RESULTS: We recruited 191 parents (116 children). Mean baseline A1C was 12%. Overall treatment-related differences were modest. There was a statistically significant effect modification of HPS by child's age, with a larger HPS benefit among parents of younger children for several outcomes: A1C (8.16% vs 9.48% in control; P = .006), lower state anxiety (P = .0094), and higher fear of hypoglycemia (P = .03) for parents of children <6 years old in the HPS group. CONCLUSIONS: Modest treatment-related differences may reflect ceiling/floor effects in many of the outcomes; we also compared HPS with another intervention rather than to usual education. Parents of younger children receiving the intervention may feel more comfortable with lower A1C levels because of management awareness gleaned from the HPS experience. Future research will include a retrospective case-control study of very young children.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/psicología , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Padres/educación , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Autocuidado/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Adulto , Ansiedad/etiología , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Hipoglucemia/etiología , Hipoglucemia/psicología , Masculino , Padres/psicología , Evaluación del Resultado de la Atención al Paciente , Autocuidado/psicología , Autoeficacia
9.
J Correct Health Care ; 20(4): 313-33, 2014 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25117427

RESUMEN

Chronic disease care is being transformed in correctional settings, given an aging inmate population, ongoing quality improvement efforts, litigation, and rising costs. The Chronic Care Model, established for chronic disease care in the community, might be a suitable framework to transform chronic disease care in prison, but it has not been systematically adapted for the correctional health care setting. We employed cognitive interviewing to adapt an extant survey used to measure the delivery of chronic illness care in the community, Assessment of Chronic Illness Care, for a prison setting. Results from the cognitive interviews and the modified Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-Prison (ACIC-P) instrument are presented in this article. Future studies will need to test the reliability and psychometric properties of the adapted ACIC-P.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad Crónica/epidemiología , Enfermedad Crónica/terapia , Prestación de Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Prisiones/organización & administración , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Adulto , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prisiones/normas , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/normas , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Autocuidado , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
11.
Appl Nurs Res ; 27(4): 213-8, 2014 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24661347

RESUMEN

The purpose of this paper is to describe an interactive process for revising a parent social support intervention study with non-significant quantitative findings but strong clinical significance. We will present the methodological challenges that were problematic in the original intervention that potentially contributed to the non-significant findings, and a revised plan of action for conducting a future parent social support intervention. Of note, we have reconsidered the theory used to frame the original study, the randomization process, the intervention clarity and fidelity plan, what measures would better capture the effect, and the development of a more robust analysis plan that considers intra-family correlation, mediation and moderation (mixed model analysis). We will present the revision for each of these methods supported by recent empirical literature. Although this process may not be appropriate for all non-significant interventions, it should be considered with any study that has clinical significance.


Asunto(s)
Mentores , Padres , Humanos , Modelos Teóricos
12.
Diabetes Educ ; 40(2): 178-90, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24470041

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this exploratory focus group study was to describe the perspectives of teens and their parents about self-management knowledge, behaviors (including division of labor associated with T1D management), and resources used to manage T1D. The overall goal is to use this information to develop a teen-family transition clinic. METHODS: The self and family management behaviors framework undergirded the separate teen-parent focus groups that were conducted concurrently. Note-based qualitative content analysis was used, resulting in several important messages. RESULTS: From the teens' perspective there was variation in interest in learning more about T1D and management. Those teens who had been diagnosed at a very young age reported not knowing anything else but diabetes, while those diagnosed later developmentally embraced the active learning process. Diabetes camp and peer group support were not seen as beneficial. All the teens were interested in "helping others" with diabetes. Parents shared the common struggle with transition of self-management, with variation in parenting styles. A small group of parents reported their "job" as a parent was to make sure their child was self-sufficient in self-management, but felt pressure from the health care providers (HCPs) to physically do the care, defeating the purpose. Parents and teens reported wanting HCPs to be less focused on "numbers" (blood glucose levels) and more on the whole person. Scheduling appointment changes and long waiting times were reported as problematic by all participants. CONCLUSIONS: Teen and parent perspectives are critical in designing future well-received adolescent-family transition clinics. Development from the ground up with family recommendations may contribute to high-quality health outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente , Automonitorización de la Glucosa Sanguínea , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/psicología , Dieta para Diabéticos , Consejo Dirigido/métodos , Ejercicio , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Autocuidado , Adaptación Psicológica , Adolescente , Automonitorización de la Glucosa Sanguínea/psicología , Automonitorización de la Glucosa Sanguínea/estadística & datos numéricos , Niño , Conducta Cooperativa , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/sangre , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Dieta para Diabéticos/psicología , Ejercicio/psicología , Femenino , Grupos Focales/métodos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Relaciones Padres-Hijo , Responsabilidad Parental , Investigación Cualitativa , Calidad de Vida , Autocuidado/psicología , Apoyo Social , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
SAGE Open Med ; 2: 2050312114520856, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26770703

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this project was to develop the first disease-specific instrument for the evaluation of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Focus groups and interview sessions were conducted, with chronic pancreatitis patients, to identify items felt to impact quality of life which were subsequently formatted into a paper-and-pencil instrument. This instrument was used to conduct an online survey by an expert panel of pancreatologists to evaluate its content validity. Finally, the modified instrument was presented to patients during precognitive testing interviews to evaluate its clarity and appropriateness. RESULTS: In total, 10 patients were enrolled in the focus groups and interview sessions where they identified 50 items. Once redundant items were removed, the 40 remaining items were made into a paper-and-pencil instrument referred to as the Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument. Through the processes of content validation and precognitive testing, the number of items in the instrument was reduced to 24. CONCLUSIONS: This marks the development of the first disease-specific instrument to evaluate quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. It includes unique features not found in generic instruments (economic factors, stigma, and spiritual factors). Although this marks a giant step forward, psychometric evaluation is still needed prior to its clinical use.

14.
AIDS Behav ; 17(1): 284-97, 2013 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22407465

RESUMEN

A decade after widespread recognition that adherence to medication regimens is key to antiretroviral effectiveness, considerable controversy remains regarding a "gold standard" for adherence measurement. Each adherence measurement approach has strengths and weaknesses and each rests on specific assumptions. The range of assumptions regarding adherence measurement and the diversity with which each approach is implemented strongly suggest that the evaluation of a particular measure outside of the context in which it was used (e.g. the study's operational protocol) may result in undeserved confidence or lack of confidence in study results. The purpose of this paper is to propose a set of best practices across commonly used measurement methods. Recommendations regarding what information should be included in published reports regarding how adherence was measured are provided to promote improvement in the quality of measurement of medication adherence in research.


Asunto(s)
Fármacos Anti-VIH/administración & dosificación , Monitoreo de Drogas/normas , Infecciones por VIH/tratamiento farmacológico , Cumplimiento de la Medicación , Proyectos de Investigación/normas , Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto/normas , Monitoreo de Drogas/métodos , Humanos , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto/normas , Autoinforme/normas
15.
Res Nurs Health ; 35(4): 397-408, 2012 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22511461

RESUMEN

Accurately measuring trust between patients and health care providers is important because low patient-provider trust can lead to poor treatment adherence and negative health outcomes. To measure patient-provider trust, we developed the Health Care Relationship (HCR) Trust scale. Findings from our initial use of the scale suggested the need to examine the scale's psychometric performance in a larger sample of adults with various chronic health conditions. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the HCR Trust Scale in a random sample of adult primary care patients. Thirteen of the original 15 items fit the data best; a single-factor structure explained 67% of the variance in patient-provider trust. The Cronbach's alpha for the 13-item HCR Trust Scale-Revised was .96.


Asunto(s)
Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios/normas , Confianza/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Grupos de Población Continentales/psicología , Grupos de Población Continentales/estadística & datos numéricos , Análisis Factorial , Femenino , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Atención Primaria de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Pruebas Psicológicas/normas , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Factores Sexuales , Adulto Joven
16.
Chest ; 141(3): 782-786, 2012 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22396563

RESUMEN

The purpose of this article is to review the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Privacy Rule, the Security Rule, and common issues encountered by researchers related to these federal privacy and security requirements. This article discusses the misconceptions that researchers may hold about HIPAA, including the process for reviewing protected health information when preparing to conduct a study, potential constraint on participant recruitment, and application of HIPAA to a researcher's clinical population. We also present ways to reframe the negative connotations associated with this regulation and provide tips for researchers about how to work with HIPAA when planning and conducting a study and reporting on study findings. Finally, we suggest that the principles of HIPAA be considered when conducting studies in international settings.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/tendencias , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Proyectos de Investigación/tendencias , Seguridad Computacional , Confidencialidad , Registros de Salud Personal , Humanos , Estados Unidos
17.
Diabetes Educ ; 38(1): 50-7, 2012.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22222512

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To purpose of the pilot study was to evaluate the use of a pediatric human patient simulator (HPS) to teach parents diabetes management for their children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, referred to as Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes. METHODS: A focus group study and 2 pilot studies (1-group study and a randomized 2-group study) were used to develop and test a teaching intervention. Parents were recruited from the Pediatric Diabetes Clinic at UMass Memorial Medical Center. A brainstorming group (n = 6) discussed the simulator concept and what modifications would be necessary to enhance parent teaching; the authors also developed the initial hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia teaching vignettes. Two focus groups (n = 13) discussed the acceptance of using a simulator and the timing and content of the teaching sessions. Based on their recommendations, a 1-group pretest-posttest pilot was conducted with parents (n = 10) receiving hypoglycemia education enhanced with the HPS, followed by a randomized 2-group pilot study (n = 16). Findings The focus group participants enthusiastically supported the use of the pediatric HPS after diagnosis and made recommendations for the timing and content of the teaching sessions. Major findings from the pilot work included (1) successful recruitment of 16 participants from only 1 site within 6 weeks, (2) instrument reliability demonstrated for all scales, and (3) mean change from baseline in the predicted direction for all measures. CONCLUSIONS: The HPS has the potential of providing parents an innovative means of learning diabetes management through visualization during the early months after diagnosis and so warrants a powered study to determine its efficacy.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/rehabilitación , Padres/educación , Educación del Paciente como Asunto , Desarrollo de Programa , Adolescente , Adulto , Actitud Frente a la Salud , Automonitorización de la Glucosa Sanguínea , Niño , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/epidemiología , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Padres/psicología , Proyectos Piloto
18.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 36(4): 224-31, 2011.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21709518

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To pilot test a social support intervention for fathers of children <13 years old newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). DESIGN AND METHODS: The pilot study was part of a larger randomized, controlled clinical trial. Father participants (28 fathers of children newly diagnosed) were recruited from two pediatric diabetes centers. For 12 months fathers (n = 19) and their spouses in the experimental arm received social support (home visits and phone calls). Control group fathers (n = 9) and their spouses received the phone number of an experienced parent (but not formally educated to provide social support) to call as needed. RESULTS: Fathers in the intervention group had significantly greater confidence but scored higher on worry at 12 months than control group fathers. Fathers in the two groups did not differ significantly in disease-related concerns or perceived disease impact on the family, nor did they differ significantly in perceived amount and helpfulness of their daily management. However, mothers overall perceived fathers as contributing more care and help than fathers perceived themselves (p > .10). Fathers in the experimental arm identified parent mentors as individuals they would seek advice regarding day-to-day management and community agencies. Over this 4.5 year study, 6 of 28 father participants and two of the three father mentors dropped out. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Nurses caring for families with young children newly diagnosed with T1DM should consider fathers social support needs and encourage their participation in day-to-day management.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Padre/educación , Padre/psicología , Apoyo Social , Adulto , Niño , Preescolar , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/psicología , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto
19.
Diabetes Educ ; 37(4): 508-18, 2011.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21700814

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this mixed-methods descriptive study with parents of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes was to explore their experiences with peer social support following the Social Support to Empower Parents (STEP) intervention and the usefulness of the Family Management Measure (FaMM) in this population. METHODS: Parents who were in the experimental arm of STEP were recruited. Qualitative interviews were conducted (n = 21), and 11 parents completed the FaMM, a quantitative family-functioning measure. Qualitative content data analysis was conducted and compared to the descriptive measure analysis. Findings Three themes were identified: availability, practical tips, and common ground. Five FaMM subscales were reliable (α > .80) in this small sample. CONCLUSIONS: The findings illustrate that the STEP intervention is helpful, providing the participants with emotional, affirmational, and informational social support. The use of the FaMM is a first step in assessing family management in families with children with type 1 diabetes.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1 , Salud de la Familia , Mentores , Padres , Grupo Paritario , Apoyo Social , Adulto , Niño , Femenino , Educación en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Responsabilidad Parental , Padres/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estados Unidos
20.
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care ; 21(1): 63-74, 2010.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19853480

RESUMEN

Hepatitis C infection is a major problem for approximately 250,000 HIV-infected persons in the United States. Although HIV infection is well-controlled in most of this population, they suffer liver-associated morbidity and mortality. Conversely, hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment uptake remains quite low (15%-30%). Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore HCV treatment experiences and decision making in adults with HIV infection. The study sample included 39 coinfected adults; 16 in the HCV-treated cohort (who were interviewed a maximum of 3 times) and 23 in the HCV-nontreatment cohort. Analysis of interviews identified 2 treatment barriers (fears and vicarious experiences) and 4 facilitating factors (experience with illness management, patient-provider relationships, gaining sober time, and facing treatment head-on). Analysis of these data also revealed a preliminary model to guide intervention development and theoretical perspectives. Ultimately, research is urgently needed to test interventions that improve HCV evaluation and treatment uptake among HIV-infected patients.


Asunto(s)
Toma de Decisiones , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Hepatitis C/tratamiento farmacológico , Adulto , Antivirales/uso terapéutico , Comorbilidad , Femenino , Hepatitis C/epidemiología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
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