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1.
Prog Community Health Partnersh ; 11(1): 81-86, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28603154

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Academic partners typically build community capacity for research, but few examples exist whereby community partners build community research capacity. This paper describes the benefits of communities sharing their "best practices" with each other for the purpose of building health research capacity. METHODS: In the context of a grant designed to engage African American communities to address health disparities (Faith Academic Initiatives Transforming Health [FAITH] in the Delta), leaders of two counties exchanged their "best practices" of creating faith-based networks and community health assessment tools to conduct a collective health assessment. LESSONS LEARNED: There were numerous strengths in engaging communities to build each other's capacity to conduct research. Communities identified with each other, perceived genuineness, conveyed legitimacy, and provided insider knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: Engaging communities to build each other's research capacity is a potentially valuable strategy.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos , Creación de Capacidad/organización & administración , Redes Comunitarias/organización & administración , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Arkansas , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Humanos , Población Rural
2.
Nurse Educ ; 42(6): 299-302, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28481863

RESUMEN

This article provides an overview of the integration of a pilot service learning (SL) project in a doctoral-level qualitative research course. Faculty partnered with a nonprofit organization that prepares former foster youth for the challenges of adulthood. The project objectives were to (1) increase students' knowledge/skills in qualitative methods, research ethics, and cultural/social issues and (2) promote community collaboration. The outcomes demonstrate that the project was feasible, valuable, and aligned with the principles of SL.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/organización & administración , Investigación Cualitativa , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Proyectos Piloto , Proyectos de Investigación , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología
3.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 28(1): 548-565, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28239018

RESUMEN

A number of approaches have been used to obtain community members' health perspectives. Health services researchers often conduct focus groups while political scientists and community groups may hold forums. To compare and contrast these two approaches, we conducted six focus groups (n = 50) and seven deliberative democracy forums (n = 233) to obtain the perspectives of rural African Americans on mental health problems in their community. Inductive qualitative analysis found three common themes: rural African Americans (1) understood stresses of poverty and racism were directly related to mental health, (2) were concerned about widespread mental illness stigma, and (3) thought community members could not identify mental health problems requiring treatment. Deductive analyses identified only minor differences in content between the two approaches. This single case study suggests that researchers could consider using deliberative democracy forums rather than focus groups with marginalized populations, particularly when seeking to mobilize communities to create community-initiated interventions.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Recolección de Datos/métodos , Trastornos Mentales/etnología , Salud Mental/etnología , Población Rural , Adolescente , Adulto , Participación de la Comunidad , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Alfabetización en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pobreza/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa , Racismo/psicología , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud/etnología , Estigma Social , Estrés Psicológico/etnología , Adulto Joven
4.
Psychiatr Serv ; 68(6): 573-578, 2017 Jun 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28142389

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Rural African Americans are disproportionately affected by social stressors that place them at risk of developing psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to understand mental health, mental health treatment, and barriers to treatment from the perspective of rural African-American residents and other stakeholders in order to devise culturally acceptable treatment approaches. METHODS: Seven focus groups (N=50) were conducted with four stakeholder groups: primary care providers, faith community representatives, college students and administrators, and individuals living with mental illness. A semistructured interview guide was used to elicit perspectives on mental health, mental health treatment, and ways to improve mental health in rural African-American communities. Inductive analysis was used to identify emergent themes and develop a conceptual model grounded in the textual data. RESULTS: Stressful living environments (for example, impoverished communities) and broader community-held beliefs (for example, religious beliefs and stigma) had an impact on perceptions of mental health and contributed to barriers to help seeking. Participants identified community-level strategies to improve emotional wellness in rural African-American communities, such as providing social support, improving mental health literacy, and promoting emotional wellness. CONCLUSIONS: Rural African Americans experience several barriers that impede treatment use. Strategies that include conceptualizing mental illness as a normal reaction to stressful living environments, the use of community-based mental health services, and provision of mental health education to the general public may improve use of services in this population.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Necesidades y Demandas de Servicios de Salud , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Población Rural , Adolescente , Adulto , Arkansas , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Masculino , Salud Mental , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pobreza , Investigación Cualitativa , Estigma Social , Apoyo Social , Adulto Joven
5.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 38(3): 502-510, 2016 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26359314

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Health assessments are used to prioritize community-level health concerns, but the role of individuals' health concerns and experiences is unknown. We sought to understand to what extent community health assessments reflect health concerns of the community-at-large versus a representation of the participants sampled. METHODS: We conducted a health assessment survey in 30 rural African American churches (n = 412). Multivariable logistic regression produced odds ratios examining associations between personal health concern (this health concern is important to me), personal health experience (I have been diagnosed with this health issue) and community health priorities (this health concern is important to the community) for 20 health issues. RESULTS: Respondents reported significant associations for 19/20 health conditions between personal health concern and the ranking of that concern as a community priority (all P < 0.05). Inconsistent associations were seen between personal health experience of a specific health condition and the ranking of that condition as a community priority. CONCLUSIONS: Personal health concerns reported by individuals in a study sample may impact prioritization of community health initiatives. Further research should examine how personal health concerns are formed.


Asunto(s)
Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Salud Pública , Afroamericanos/psicología , Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Prioridades en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Estado de Salud , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Virginia
6.
Prog Community Health Partnersh ; 9(3): 423-30, 2015.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26548794

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Faith-based mental health interventions developed and implemented using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach hold promise for reaching rural African Americans and addressing health disparities. OBJECTIVES: To describe the development, challenges, and lessons learned from the Trinity Life Management, a faith-based stress management intervention in a rural African American faith community. METHODS: The researchers used a CBPR approach by partnering with the African American faith community to develop a stress management intervention. Development strategies include working with key informants, focus groups, and a community advisory board (CAB). RESULTS: The community identified the key concepts that should be included in a stress management intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The faith-based "Trinity Life Management" stress management intervention was developed collaboratively by a CAB and an academic research team. The intervention includes stress management techniques that incorporate Biblical principles and information about the stress-distress-depression continuum.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/métodos , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Religión y Medicina , Población Rural , Estrés Psicológico/terapia , Comités Consultivos , Arkansas , Conducta Cooperativa , Grupos Focales , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Humanos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos
7.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24859098

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Mental Health-Clergy Partnership Program established partnerships between institutional (Department of Veterans' Affairs [VA] chaplains, mental health providers) and community (local clergy, parishioners) groups to develop programs to assist rural veterans with mental health needs. OBJECTIVES: Describe the development, challenges, and lessons learned from the Mental Health-Clergy Partnership Program in three Arkansas towns between 2009 and 2012. METHODS: Researchers identified three rural Arkansas sites, established local advisory boards, and obtained quantitative ratings of the extent to which partnerships were participatory. RESULTS: Partnerships seemed to become more participatory over time. Each site developed distinctive programs with variation in fidelity to original program goals. Challenges included developing trust and maintaining racial diversity in local program leadership. CONCLUSIONS: Academics can partner with local faith communities to create unique programs that benefit the mental health of returning veterans. Research is needed to determine the effectiveness of community based programs, especially relative to typical "top-down" outreach approaches.


Asunto(s)
Clero , Servicios Comunitarios de Salud Mental/organización & administración , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/organización & administración , Salud de los Veteranos/estadística & datos numéricos , Arkansas , Servicios Comunitarios de Salud Mental/tendencias , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/tendencias , Humanos , Asociación entre el Sector Público-Privado , Religión y Psicología , Servicios de Salud Rural/organización & administración , Servicios de Salud Rural/tendencias , Salud de los Veteranos/tendencias , Recursos Humanos
8.
Public Health Nurs ; 31(3): 262-71, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24720658

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore how a rural African American faith community would address depression within their congregations and the community as a whole. DESIGN AND SAMPLE: A qualitative, interpretive descriptive methodology was used. The sample included 24 participants representing pastors, parishioners interested in health, and African American men who had experienced symptoms of depression in a community in the Arkansas Delta. MEASURES: The primary data sources for this qualitative research study were focus groups. RESULTS: Participants identified three key players in the rural African American faith community who can combat depression: the Church, the Pastor/Clergy, and the Layperson. The roles of each were identified and recommendations for each to address depression disparities in rural African Americans. CONCLUSIONS: The recommendations can be used to develop faith-based interventions for depression targeting the African American faith community.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Depresión/etnología , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Religión , Población Rural , Adulto , Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Arkansas , Clero/estadística & datos numéricos , Depresión/prevención & control , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación Cualitativa , Adulto Joven
9.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 28(1): 17-20, 2014 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24506982

RESUMEN

Depression is projected to become the leading cause of disability and the second leading contributor to the global burden of disease in approximately 10years. Few studies have explored the signs and symptoms of depression experienced by older African American men. Therefore, a pilot study was developed with the goal of addressing this gap in knowledge. Despite a variety of recruitment strategies, the study yielded no participants after 9months of effort. Lessons learned from the recruitment efforts and other researchers' successful techniques and strategies are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Investigación en Enfermería Clínica , Trastorno Depresivo Mayor/etnología , Trastorno Depresivo Mayor/enfermería , Selección de Paciente , Anciano , Arkansas , Trastorno Depresivo Mayor/diagnóstico , Trastorno Depresivo Mayor/psicología , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud/etnología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/etnología , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/psicología , Proyectos Piloto , Estigma Social
10.
J Ethn Subst Abuse ; 13(1): 72-90, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24564561

RESUMEN

Research has shown a relationship between depression, substance use, and religiosity but, few have investigated this relationship in a community sample of African Americans who use drugs. This study examined the relationship between dimensions of religion (positive and negative religious coping; private and public religious participation; religious preference; and God-, clergy-, and congregation-based religious support), depression symptomatology, and substance use among 223 African American cocaine users. After controlling for gender, employment, and age, greater congregation-based support and greater clergy-based support were associated with fewer reported depressive symptoms. In addition, greater congregation-based support was associated with less alcohol use.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Relacionados con Cocaína/epidemiología , Religión , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Población Rural , Adulto Joven
11.
J Relig Health ; 53(3): 796-808, 2014 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23288483

RESUMEN

Among African-Americans, the faith community has a long history of providing support to its members. Because African-American men tend to delay and decline traditional depression treatment, the faith community may be an effective source of support. The aim of this study was to determine how a rural African-American faith community describes and perceives experiences of depression among African-American males. A convenience sample of 24 men and women participated in focus groups and interview. Four themes were identified: defining depression, etiology of depression, denial of depression, and effect of masculine roles on depression experience.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Actitud Frente a la Salud , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria , Trastorno Depresivo/psicología , Trastorno Depresivo/terapia , Curación por la Fe , Cuidado Pastoral , Religión y Psicología , Población Rural , Adaptación Psicológica , Adulto , Anciano , Estudios de Cohortes , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Trastorno Depresivo/etnología , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia , Femenino , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estrés Psicológico/complicaciones , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
12.
J Nurs Adm ; 44(1): 5-7, 2014 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24316611

RESUMEN

A partnership between an academic medical center and a college of nursing has proven to be an equally beneficial opportunity for continuous readiness for The Joint Commission. Nursing students learn the principles of regulatory compliance and accreditation through simulated surveys in their leadership and management course. The medical center receives continuous feedback and achieves survey readiness and fluency with better-prepared new graduates.


Asunto(s)
Centros Médicos Académicos , Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations , Facultades de Enfermería , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Retroalimentación , Encuestas de Atención de la Salud , Garantía de la Calidad de Atención de Salud , Estados Unidos
13.
J Natl Black Nurses Assoc ; 24(1): 31-8, 2013 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24218871

RESUMEN

Mental health disparities exist for rural African-Americans regarding the early detection of depression and its effective treatment. Disparities that are evident in rural communities include limited mental health resources and the stigma of depression. The faith community has a long-standing history of being the initial source of help to those who experience depression. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how rural African-American faith communities view the barriers to diagnosis and treatment of depression. A convenience sample of 24 persons (N = 24) participated in focus groups and interviews. Four internal barriers were identified: personal business, "mindset," "denial," and "put on a front." Additionally,four external barriers were identified: "spiritual beliefs," "lack of medical resources," "lack of education about depression," and "stigma." The identified barriers supported the results from previous studies, but they also highlighted other less acknowledged barriers. In conclusion, interventions are needed to overcome these barriers in order to eliminate the depression disparities experienced by this population.


Asunto(s)
Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Africana , Depresión/diagnóstico , Depresión/terapia , Religión , Población Rural , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
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