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1.
J Prosthodont ; 2020 Aug 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32869384

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of various finishing and polishing techniques on the surface roughness of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) materials, lithium disilicate (IPS e.max), lithium disilicate reinforced with lithium aluminosilicate (Straumann® n!ce™), and a stackable low-fusing nanofluorapatite glass ceramic (Ceram). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Flat specimens (n = 12) per treatment group were fabricated 2 mm thick, 15 mm in length, and 12mm in width. Samples were either glazed or polished. Glazing was accomplished with either Ivoclar IPS e.max CAD crystall glaze spray or IPS e.max Ceram glaze paste, according to manufacturer instructions. Three different polishing systems were tested: Brasseler Dialite HP, Ivoclar OptraFine, and Komet LD/ZR. Polishing was performed using a Kavo adjustable slow speed electric contra-angle handpiece mounted to an oscillating Toothbrush Dentifrice Assessment Instrument. Surface roughness data was collected using a benchtop stylus profilometer and analyzed for statistical significance using two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Representative scanning electron micrograph images were generated for all samples. RESULTS: Overall there was no significant difference in Ra when comparing types of ceramic (p = 0.9315, F = 0.071). However, there was a statistically significant difference when comparing groups of finishing treatments (p < 0.001, F = 113.5) and also when comparing finishing treatment with ceramic type (p < 0.001, F = 11.13). No significant difference was found with IPS e.max CAD crystall glaze spray on Straumann® n!ce™ versus IPS e.max Ceram glaze paste on IPS e.max Ceram (p = 0.8745) or IPS e.max CAD crystall glaze spray on IPS e.max versus IPS e.max Ceram glaze paste on IPS e.max Ceram (p = 0.3373). Significant differences in Ra of Straumann® n!ce™ were found when comparing Brasseler with Ivoclar (p = 0.0014) and Ivoclar with Komet (p = 0.047). No significant difference was observed between Brasseler and Komet (p = 0.8099). CONCLUSIONS: It appears that the degree of surface roughness depends upon the specific finishing system and ceramic combination used. Straumann® n!ce™ is more efficiently polished using Brasseler Dialite HP or Komet LD/ZR polishing systems. Ivoclar crystal glaze spray was found to be equally as effective on Straumann® n!ce™ and IPS e.max as IPS e.max Ceram glaze paste on IPS e.max Ceram.

2.
J Prosthet Dent ; 124(3): 274-349, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32811666

RESUMEN

This comprehensive review of the 2019 restorative dental literature is offered to inform busy dentists regarding remarkable publications and noteworthy progress made in the profession. Developed by the Scientific Investigation Committee of the American Academy of Restorative Dentistry, each author brings discipline-specific expertise to 1 of 8 sections of the report: (1) prosthodontics; (2) periodontics, alveolar bone, and peri-implant tissues; (3) implant dentistry; (4) dental materials and therapeutics; (5) occlusion and temporomandibular disorders; (6) sleep-related breathing disorders; (7) oral medicine and oral and maxillofacial surgery; and (8) dental caries and cariology. The report targets important information likely to influence day-to-day dental treatment decisions. Each review is not intended to stand alone but to update interested readers so that they may visit source material when greater detail is desired. As the profession moves toward evidence-based clinical decision-making, an incredible volume of potentially valuable dental literature continues to increase. It is the intention of this review and its authors to provide assistance in negotiating the extensive dental literature published in 2019. It is our hope that readers find this work useful in the clinical management of dental patients.


Asunto(s)
Caries Dental , Materiales Dentales , Oclusión Dental , Humanos , Periodoncia , Prostodoncia , Estados Unidos
3.
J Prosthet Dent ; 122(3): 198-269, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405523

RESUMEN

This comprehensive review of the 2018 dental literature is provided to inform busy dentists about progress in the profession. Developed by the Committee on Scientific Investigation of the American Academy of Restorative Dentistry, each author brings discipline-specific expertise to one of the 8 sections of the report including (1) prosthodontics; (2) periodontics, alveolar bone, and peri-implant tissues; (3) implant dentistry; (4) dental materials and therapeutics; (5) occlusion and temporomandibular disorders; (6) sleep-related breathing disorders; (7) oral medicine and oral and maxillofacial surgery; and (8) dental caries and cariology. The report targets important information that will likely influence day-to-day treatment decisions. Each review is not intended to stand alone but to update interested readers so that they may visit source materials if greater detail is desired. As the profession continues its march toward evidence-based clinical decision-making, an already voluminous library of potentially valuable dental literature continues to grow. It is the intention of this review and its authors to provide assistance in navigating the extensive dental literature published in 2018. It is our hope that readers find this work useful in the clinical management of patients moving forward.


Asunto(s)
Caries Dental , Materiales Dentales , Oclusión Dental , Humanos , Periodoncia , Prostodoncia , Estados Unidos
4.
J Prosthodont ; 28(3): 305-309, 2019 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30693598

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To evaluate the rebonding strength of ceramics to titanium alloy after disassembling by heat treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 40 titanium alloy (titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium) disks (4.0 × 6.6 mm) and 20 zirconia (Lava Plus) disks were manufactured using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. Twenty heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press LT) disks were fabricated and used as controls. Bonding protocol for each specimen surface was performed according to manufacturer's instructions. Specimens (n = 10) of zirconia/titanium alloy (ZR) and lithium disilicate/titanium alloy (LD) were bonded using adhesive resin cement (RelyX Ultimate) and then subjected to a heat treatment (HT, 320°C, 2 minutes) to disassemble the bonding complex, cleaned with aluminum oxide airborne-particle abrasion, and rebonded following the initial protocol, group ZRHT and group LDHT, respectively. After 5000 cycles of thermal cycling, a shear bond test was conducted. A universal testing machine was used at a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. Failed specimens were examined with stereomicroscopy at 10× magnification to identify the mode of failure. One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were applied for statistical analysis of the shear bond strength data, with statistical significance at α = 0.05. RESULTS: The mean ± SD bond strength values ranged from 28.3 ± 7.2 to 45.9 ± 9.7 MPa. Statistically significant lower shear bond strength values were obtained from the LD group (p = 0.002, F = 5.89), while no statistically significant differences in bond strength were observed between the ZR and ZRHT groups (p > 0.05). Failure mode was predominantly mixed-type failure pattern for all specimens. CONCLUSIONS: Heat and abrasion surface treatment increased the bond strength of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics cemented to titanium alloy, but no effect was observed on zirconia/titanium alloy bonding.


Asunto(s)
Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Óxido de Aluminio , Cerámica , Porcelana Dental , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Ensayo de Materiales , Cementos de Resina , Resistencia al Corte , Propiedades de Superficie
5.
J Prosthodont ; 28(4): e912-e916, 2019 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30295369

RESUMEN

Full-arch, fixed, implant-supported prostheses can be designed to be cement- or screw-retained. Both retention mechanisms have a few inherent disadvantages. A fixed attachment system has been introduced to circumvent the disadvantages of both screw and cement retention. This system eliminates the screw access holes and the use of cement. The number of intraoral procedures required is also reduced. The purpose of this article is to report a case using the Locator F-Tx Attachment System to facilitate fabrication of an esthetic, clinician-retrievable, full-arch implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis.


Asunto(s)
Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Retención de la Prótesis , Cementación , Retención de Prótesis Dentales , Estética Dental
6.
J Prosthodont ; 28(4): e909-e911, 2019 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30117222

RESUMEN

Subcrestal implant placement helps gain vertical restorative space at the location of the implants; however, this leads to the development of a tall mucosal cuff, necessitating the use of tall abutments. This article describes the technique of gaining restorative space by decreasing the height of the mucosal cuff with an Erbium YAG laser.


Asunto(s)
Implantes Dentales , Láseres de Estado Sólido , Proceso Alveolar , Pilares Dentales , Implantación Dental Endoósea , Prótesis de Recubrimiento
7.
J Prosthet Dent ; 120(6): 816-878, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30545471

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: There are countless numbers of scientific studies published in countless scientific journals on subjects related to restorative dentistry. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to review pertinent scientific studies published in 2017 on topics of interest to restorative dentists. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The authors, considered to be experts in their disciplines searched the scientific literature in 7 different areas (prosthodontics, periodontics, dental materials, occlusion and temporomandibular disorders, sleep-disordered breathing, oral medicine and oral and maxillofacial surgery and dental caries). Pertinent articles were either identified and referenced or reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 437 articles in 7 disciplines were identified or reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: An impressive amount of scientific literature related to restorative dentistry was published in 2017. The evidence presented in this article can assist dentists in the practice of contemporary evidence-based dentistry.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Dental , Enfermedades de la Boca/terapia , Prostodoncia , Cirugía Bucal , Bibliometría , Caries Dental/terapia , Materiales Dentales , Oclusión Dental , Odontología Basada en la Evidencia , Humanos , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño/terapia , Trastornos de la Articulación Temporomandibular/terapia
8.
J Prosthet Dent ; 120(2): 246-251, 2018 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29551379

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Denture tooth fracture may limit the longevity of dental prostheses. Whether the strength of the denture tooth material is affected by the denture processing technique is unclear. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether the denture processing technique affects the mechanical properties of denture tooth materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two denture processing techniques, injection and compression molding, were tested for 3 types of denture teeth: nanohybrid composite (NHC), interpenetrating network (IPN), and microfiller-reinforced polyacrylic (MRP). Denture teeth were processed by using an injection-molded resin or a compression-molded resin. Unprocessed denture teeth served as the control. After teeth were processed, they were sectioned into rectangular beams for 3-point bend testing (n=20 to 24). Elastic moduli were determined from load deflection and maximum stress from maximum bending load. The results were statistically analyzed by using 2-way ANOVA and multiple comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS: The processing technique and the type of denture tooth affected both the elastic modulus and the maximum stress. The injection-molded technique resulted in significantly higher (24% to 26%) elastic modulus for NHC and IPN (12% higher in MRP, but not statistically significant) and higher (12% to 17%) maximum stresses for IPN and MRP (3% lower in NHC, but not statistically significant). Compression-molded technique increased the elastic modulus of IPN and NHC by 10% to 17% (3% lower in MRP but not statistically significant), but maximum stresses were not statistically significantly different in any of the tested teeth. Regardless of processing, MRP teeth had the highest elastic modulus (8.0 to 9.2 GPa) but the lowest maximum stresses (97 to 124 MPa), whereas IPN teeth had the lowest elastic modulus (5.5 GPa) but high or highest maximum stress (171 to 192 MPa). CONCLUSIONS: The injection-molded technique significantly increased the elastic modulus of NHC and IPN teeth and significantly increased the maximum stress of IPN teeth. The compression-molded technique did not significantly affect mechanical properties of denture teeth.


Asunto(s)
Materiales Dentales/química , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Bases para Dentadura , Diseño de Dentadura/métodos , Dentaduras , Módulo de Elasticidad , Resinas Acrílicas , Análisis de Varianza , Fenómenos Químicos , Química Física , Fuerza Compresiva , Humanos , Inyecciones , Ensayo de Materiales , Presión , Estrés Mecánico
9.
J Prosthet Dent ; 120(1): 123-131, 2018 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29429839

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Artificial markers called fiducials are commonly used to orient digitized surfaces for analysis. However, when these markers are tangible and placed in the region of interest, they may alter surface topography and influence data analysis. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to apply a modified digital surface fitting method based on anatomic landmarks to evaluate denture accuracy and to use 2 different denture processing techniques to evaluate the method. The goal was to noninvasively measure and describe any surface differences in denture processing techniques at the intaglio and denture tooth levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty standardized maxillary complete dentures were waxed on standardized edentulous casts and processed by using acrylic resin compression (COM, n=10) and injection molding (INJ, n=10) methods. Digital scans were recorded of the anatomic surface of the cast, the intaglio and cameo surfaces of the acrylic resin dentures, and the cameo surface of the wax dentures. Three anatomic fiducials were identified on denture intaglio and cast scans and 4 on the cameo surfaces of waxed and acrylic resin denture scans. These fiducials were then used to digitally align the anatomic with the processed intaglio surfaces and the waxed with the processed cameo surfaces. Surface displacements were compared among processed dentures expressed at specific points (9 tissue landmarks and 8 tooth landmarks). The accuracy of surface displacements was assessed by changes in the number and location of anatomic fiducials. The scanning precision and the intraobserver repeatability in the selection of dental landmarks were also determined. For each landmark, the spatial (x, y, and z) mean differences between the 2 processing techniques were calculated for the intaglio and the cameo surfaces and presented on each orthogonal plane. Statistical nonparametric comparison of these means was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Benjamini-Hochberg corrections for multiple comparisons were used. RESULTS: Changing the number and the location of anatomic landmarks had a small effect on the precision of the surface fitting. Repeated scans yielded high precision levels. In contrast, intraobserver repeatability had a larger error. In general, injection-molded dentures showed less displacement after polymerization than did the compression-molded ones. These differences were more substantial at the denture tooth level than on the intaglio surfaces. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic noninvasive fiducials chosen at distinct locations of maxillary edentulous areas seem to be reliable markers for the superposition of corresponding digital surface scans. Maxillary dentures processed with the injection molding technique have minimal deformation. Posterior denture teeth displace in 3 dimensions with the compression molding technique.


Asunto(s)
Puntos Anatómicos de Referencia , Ajuste de Precisión de Prótesis , Dentadura Completa Superior , Procesamiento de Imagen Asistido por Computador/métodos , Maxilar/anatomía & histología , Bases para Dentadura , Humanos , Técnicas In Vitro , Programas Informáticos , Propiedades de Superficie , Dimensión Vertical
10.
J Prosthet Dent ; 119(3): 390-396, 2018 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28756865

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Limited information is available on the effect of an incomplete ferrule because of the varying residual axial wall heights and the volume of residual tooth structure on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated and restored maxillary incisors. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro investigation was to examine the effect of varying residual axial wall heights, residual coronal tooth structure, and the absence of 1 proximal axial wall on the fracture resistance and failure mode of endodontically treated teeth restored with metal posts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty intact human maxillary central incisors were divided into 6 groups (n=10): no ferrule (NF), 2-mm complete ferrule (CF2), 2-mm (IF2), 3-mm (IF3), and 4-mm (IF4) incomplete ferrules missing a single interproximal wall, and a control group that had a 6-mm incomplete ferrule (IF6). Cast metal post-and-cores were placed in all experimental specimens except for controls. Control specimens received 1 interproximal cavity preparation extending to the root canal access and a composite resin restoration. Complete metal crowns were then cemented on all specimens. Completed specimens were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C/55°C) followed by the immediate testing of fracture resistance. Failed specimens were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated to identify the failure mode. The data were analyzed with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS: An incomplete ferrule (IF2) with 1 interproximal wall missing had significantly reduced fracture resistance (697 N) compared with a complete ferrule (932 N). An increase of 3 to 4 mm of remaining wall height improved fracture resistance, from 844 N (IF3) to 853 N (IF4). Partial decementation was noticed in 8 NF and 5 IF2 specimens. IF3 and IF4 had no decementations. Radicular fractures and cracks (catastrophic failure) were observed in all IF2, IF3, and IF4, 9 CF2, and 6 NF specimens. In 7 specimens without posts (IF6, control), composite resin foundation and/or coronal dentin fracture were observed and the failure was considered repairable. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this in vitro study indicated that specimens with a 2-mm ferrule of uniform height were more resistant to fracture than specimens with a 2-mm ferrule and 1 missing interproximal wall. An increased wall height of 3 or 4 mm was associated with a significant increase in fracture resistance and can compensate for the missing interproximal wall.


Asunto(s)
Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Incisivo , Fracturas de los Dientes , Diente no Vital , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Coronas , Fracaso de la Restauración Dental , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Humanos , Técnica de Perno Muñón
12.
J Prosthet Dent ; 118(3): 281-346, 2017 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28709678

RESUMEN

This review was conducted to assist the busy dentist in keeping abreast of the latest scientific information regarding the clinical practice of dentistry. Each of the authors, who are considered experts in their disciplines, was asked to peruse the scientific literature in their discipline published in 2016 and review the articles for important information that may affect treatment decisions. Comments on experimental methodology, statistical evaluation, and the overall validity of conclusions are included with many of the reviews. The reviews are not meant to stand alone but are intended to inform the interested reader about what has been discovered in the past year. The readers are then invited to go to the source, if they want more detail.


Asunto(s)
Atención Odontológica , Investigación Dental , Odontología , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia , Humanos
13.
Gen Dent ; 64(6): 38-45, 2016.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27814254

RESUMEN

At the heart of prosthodontic treatment planning must be a sound understanding of the quality and reliability of the prosthodontic foundation. Implant prosthodontics relies almost entirely on the biological and mechanical properties of an osseous foundation. Initiation of therapy in the absence of a healthy and stable prosthodontic foundation risks unintended and suboptimal treatment outcomes. For conventional removable partial denture (RPD) therapy, consideration must be given to interactions between the soft and hard tissues available to support and stabilize planned prostheses. The strategic addition of implants to the partially edentulous foundation can improve the support, comfort, and esthetics of an RPD, resulting in elevated patient satisfaction and greater therapeutic success. This article discusses aspects of diagnosis, treatment planning, clinical management, laboratory execution, and maintenance that must be considered in order to obtain optimal results with implant-assisted RPDs.


Asunto(s)
Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Dentadura Parcial Removible , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Humanos , Arcada Parcialmente Edéntula/cirugía , Arcada Parcialmente Edéntula/terapia
14.
J Prosthet Dent ; 116(2): 292-9, 2016 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27061633

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Denture tooth fracture or debonding remains a common problem in removable prosthodontics. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to explore factors determining failure strengths for combinations of different denture tooth designs (shape, materials) and injection or compression molded denture base resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three central incisor denture tooth designs were tested: nanohybrid composite (NHC; Ivoclar Phonares II), interpenetrating network (IPN; Dentsply Portrait), and microfiller reinforced polyacrylic (MRP; VITA Physiodens). Denture teeth of each type were processed on an injection molded resin (IvoBase HI; Ivoclar Vivadent AG) or a compression molded resin (Lucitone 199; Dentsply Intl) (n=11 or 12). The denture teeth were loaded at 45 degrees on the incisal edge. The failure load was recorded and analyzed with 2-way ANOVA (α=.05), and the fracture mode was categorized from observed fracture surfaces as cohesive, adhesive, or mixed failure. RESULTS: The following failure loads (mean ±SD) were recorded: NHC/injection molded 280 ±52 N; IPN/injection molded 331 ±41 N; MRP/injection molded 247 ±23 N; NHC/compression molded 204 ±31 N; IPN/compression molded 184 ±17 N; MRP/compression molded 201 ±16 N. Injection molded resin yielded significantly higher failure strength for all denture teeth (P<.001), among which IPN had the highest strength. Failure was predominantly cohesive in the teeth, with the exception of mixed mode for the IPN/compression group. CONCLUSIONS: When good bonding was achieved, the strength of the structure (denture tooth/base resin combination) was determined by the strength of the denture teeth, which may be affected by the processing technique.


Asunto(s)
Fuerza Compresiva , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Bases para Dentadura , Diseño de Dentadura , Resinas Acrílicas , Resinas Compuestas , Humanos , Ensayo de Materiales , Poliuretanos
16.
J Prosthet Dent ; 116(5): 663-740, 2016 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28236412

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: It is clear the contemporary dentist is confronted with a blizzard of information regarding materials and techniques from journal articles, advertisements, newsletters, the internet, and continuing education events. While some of that information is sound and helpful, much of it is misleading at best. PURPOSE: This review identifies and discusses the most important scientific findings regarding outcomes of dental treatment to assist the practitioner in making evidence-based choices. This review was conducted to assist the busy dentist in keeping abreast of the latest scientific information regarding the clinical practice of dentistry. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Each of the authors, who are considered experts in their disciplines, was asked to peruse the scientific literature published in 2015 in their discipline and review the articles for important information that may have an impact on treatment decisions. Comments on experimental methodology, statistical evaluation, and overall validity of the conclusions are included in many of the reviews. RESULTS: The reviews are not meant to stand alone but are intended to inform the interested reader about what has been discovered in the past year. The readers are then invited to go to the source if they wish more detail. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of the scientific literature published in 2015 is divided into 7 sections, dental materials, periodontics, prosthodontics, occlusion and temporomandibular disorders, sleep-disordered breathing, cariology, and implant dentistry.


Asunto(s)
Atención Odontológica , Odontología , Humanos
18.
Imaging Sci Dent ; 45(1): 41-7, 2015 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25793182

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. RESULTS: The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. CONCLUSION: The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

20.
J Prosthet Dent ; 111(6): 455-9, 2014 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24461941

RESUMEN

This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment.


Asunto(s)
Coronas , Implantes Dentales de Diente Único , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Carga Inmediata del Implante Dental , Resinas Compuestas/química , Diseño de Implante Dental-Pilar , Implantación Dental Endoósea/instrumentación , Implantación Dental Endoósea/métodos , Materiales Dentales/química , Pulido Dental/métodos , Restauración Dental Provisional , Coronas con Frente Estético , Humanos , Osteotomía/métodos , Propiedades de Superficie , Extracción Dental , Alveolo Dental/cirugía
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