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1.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(8): 774-781, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31227192

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: To describe the development and validation of the self-care counseling rubric (SCCR) to assess student self-care counseling skills. METHODS: Over two years of implementation, a comprehensive rubric was developed and revised for faculty to use. Students were assessed using the rubric in weekly, simulated patient encounters on self-care topics already taught in didactic material. The rubric underwent analysis for validation. Simulated encounters were recorded to assess inter-rater reliability. RESULTS: The internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the original SCCR and revised SCCR were 0.81 and 0.85, respectively. The mean intraclass correlation of the original SCCR and revised SCCR was 0.27 and 0.66, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The developed instrument demonstrated good reliability in assessing student self-care counseling performance. The revised SCCR can be an efficient and effective approach to track student competence in self-care counseling.

2.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(1): 58-65, 2019 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30527877

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With increasing deaths related to prescription medications, it is important to educate adolescents on the dangers of drug misuse. Pharmacists possess the knowledge and are accessible to provide education to patients on this topic; therefore, the objectives were to improve student pharmacist confidence in prescription drug misuse knowledge and engaging patients. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: As part of a co-curricular activity, pharmacy, and pre-pharmacy students participated in an informational session to establish a common foundation of drug misuse concepts using a team-based learning pedagogy. Students developed a curriculum and taught middle school children about drug and alcohol misuse. Participants' motivations for participation and confidence in drug misuse education were assessed through a 19 item pre-post survey. FINDINGS: Out of the 19 confidence items, seven had significant improvement. Students were more confident after the intervention that they could share their knowledge on drug misuse with colleagues (p = 0.012) and implement prevention strategies in their area (p = 0.020). They were also more confident in their ability to explain the definition (p = 0.001) and consequences (p = 0.003) of drug misuse. SUMMARY: A training session combined with the opportunity to apply learned concepts may be an effective way to improve the confidence of future pharmacists in educating their communities.

3.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 10(9): 1237-1242, 2018 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30497627

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nurses and pharmacists are essential healthcare team members and must collaborate to provide safe and effective patient care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nursing and pharmacy student views on interprofessional collaboration after completing an educational activity. INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY: Students participated in an interprofessional activity designed to improve empathy toward older adults and completed an open-ended questionnaire post-activity regarding their experience and views on interprofessional collaboration. Content analysis identified themes grounded in the responses. Students (n = 216) felt communication needed improvement (n = 31, 16.8%), were frustrated with fragmented care (n = 31, 16.8%), found interprofessional collaboration necessary (n = 37, 20.1%), and enjoyed the interprofessional experience (n = 17, 9.2%). DISCUSSION: Study results provide evidence for the inclusion of additional structured interprofessional activities into all health professions curriculum to emphasize collaboration, improve communication, and modify views in preparation for interprofessional practice.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum/normas , Educación en Enfermería/normas , Educación en Farmacia/normas , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Conducta Cooperativa , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación en Enfermería/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto/métodos , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 9(2): 302-310, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29233417

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To evaluate differences in student confidence and perceptions of biochemistry concepts using a team-based learning (TBL) format versus a traditional lecture-based format at two universities. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY: Two pedagogies (TBL vs lecture-based) were utilized to deliver biochemistry concepts at two universities in a first-professional year, semester-long biochemistry course. A 21-item instrument was created and administered pre-post semester to assess changes in confidence in learning biochemistry concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (eight items, 5-point, Likert-type) and changes in student perceptions of biochemistry utilizing the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains (13 items, 7- point, Likert-type). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to evaluate pre-post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests for differences between universities. FINDINGS: All students (N=111) had more confidence in biochemistry concepts post-semester, but TBL students (N=53) were significantly more confident. TBL students also had greater agreement that they are expected to actively engage in science courses post-semester, according to the perceptions of biochemistry subscale. No other differences between lecture and TBL were observed post-semester. SUMMARY: Students in a TBL course had greater gains in confidence. Since students often engage in tasks where they feel confident, TBL can be a useful pedagogy to promote student learning.


Asunto(s)
Fenómenos Bioquímicos , Percepción , Autoeficacia , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Análisis de Varianza , Grupos de Población Continentales/estadística & datos numéricos , Curriculum/normas , Escolaridad , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
5.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 9(1): 28-36, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29180150

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Pharmacists need be able to understand and utilize evidence from the literature to provide optimal patient care as well as participate in research to improve care. Thus, it is important for pharmacy students to acquire skills in research and evidence-based practice (EBP). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the changes in pharmacy student (1) perceptions of research and EBP, (2) interest in research participation, and (3) confidence in understanding the research process and developing a research proposal after completing a research course. METHODS: First-year professional pharmacy students completed a required one-semester research course. Study objectives were assessed pre- and post-semester using a survey that contained seven demographic items, nine Research Perceptions items, and 17 Confidence in Research items (5-point Likert scale; 1 = not at all confident, and 5 = extremely confident). Two years of data were collected (2012: N = 49, 2013: N = 53) and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and Mann-Whitney U tests as appropriate. RESULTS: Significant improvements were seen in students' perceptions of the importance (2012: p = 0.022, 2013: p = 0.042) and usefulness of research (p = 0.022). Students' confidence significantly increased on all items for both years (p < 0.001). There was no significant change in student plans to perform or participate in future research. More students planned to use EBP in their practice post-semester in 2013 (p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: A research course can be an effective way to increase student confidence in research and improve perceptions on the importance and usefulness of research and EBP. It may not be an effective way to increase student interest in research as a career.


Asunto(s)
Percepción , Investigación/normas , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Curriculum/normas , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/educación , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/métodos , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Investigación/educación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades/organización & administración , Universidades/normas
6.
Nurse Educ Today ; 54: 37-43, 2017 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28463732

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nurses need a sound education in research and evidence-based practice (EBP) to provide patients with optimal care, but current teaching methods could be more effective. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the changes in nursing students 1) perceptions of research and EBP, 2) confidence in research and EBP, and 3) interest in research participation after completing a course in research and EBP. DESIGN: A pre-post assessment design was utilized to compare changes in students. SETTINGS: This project was conducted at a small, private liberal arts institution with Bachelor of Science (BSN) students. PARTICIPANTS: Two cohorts of third-year BSN students (Year 1 N=55, Year 2 N=54) who were taking a required, semester-long Nursing Research and EBP course. METHODS: Students' perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP were assessed pre- and post-semester using the Confidence in Research and EBP survey, which contained 7 demographic items, 9 Research Perceptions items, and 19 Confidence in Research items (5-point Likert scale; 1=Not at all confident, 5=Extremely confident). Two years of data were collected and analyzed in SPSS v.24.0. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests and Mann-Whitney-U tests were utilized to examine the data. RESULTS: Students had significant improvements in perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP (p<0.05). They were more likely to agree to plan to use EBP in the future (p=0.007), yet there were no significant improvements on students' plans to perform research or plans to participate in research in the future. CONCLUSIONS: A Research and EBP course is an effective way to improve student perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP, increasing the likelihood of applying these skills to future nursing practice.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/educación , Investigación en Enfermería , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Bachillerato en Enfermería , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
7.
Clin Ther ; 39(4): 714-722, 2017 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28285724

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to describe the interventions and impact made by pharmacists during clinical trials. METHODS: A specialty contract research organization that used clinical trial research pharmacists to communicate with patients to support clinical trial protocol adherence, retention, and health outcomes performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 12 clinical trials that involved 2 noninsulin glucose-lowering medications. Pharmacists called study participants at specific timepoints during the trials as per protocol. During each telephone call, the number and types of interventions were documented. Descriptive statistics (frequencies) were performed to determine the number and type of interventions by call and by patient across all noninsulin glucose-lowering medication drug A and drug B studies. FINDINGS: Overall, 25,829 calls were made across all studies. Of these calls, 11,765 calls (45.5%) had at least one intervention that involved 3573 patients (92.3%). The most frequent interventions addressed adverse events (3774 [14.6%]), protocol violations for medication use (3341 [12.9%]), concurrent medications (1630 [5.9%]), and miscellaneous concerns (1269 [4.6%]). The greatest numbers of interventions were high-impact interventions (4772 [18.5%]) (eg, serious adverse events) that would seriously affect trial outcomes and patient adherence. IMPLICATIONS: Pharmacists were able to identify, support, and address multiple types of interventions related to medication management during clinical trials, including those related to concurrent medication use, adverse events, and other medication-related issues. These pharmacist interventions can result in better patient outcomes and, ultimately, more reliable study results for review and approval by regulatory agencies.


Asunto(s)
Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamiento farmacológico , Hipoglucemiantes/uso terapéutico , Farmacéuticos , Rol Profesional , Femenino , Humanos , Hipoglucemiantes/efectos adversos , Masculino , Cumplimiento de la Medicación , Persona de Mediana Edad
8.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 80(3): 46, 2016 Apr 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27170817

RESUMEN

Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students' skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Percepción , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Autocuidado/métodos , Autoimagen , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Adolescente , Adulto , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Autocuidado/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
9.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(6): 83, 2015 Aug 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26430270

RESUMEN

Objective. To evaluate pharmacy and nursing student self-perceptions of interdisciplinary communication skills, faculty member perceptions of interdisciplinary communication skills, and changes in those skills after increasing the interdisciplinary education content. Design. Two cohorts of pharmacy and nursing (bachelors of science in nursing, BSN) students in respective, semester-long research courses engaged in active learning on interdisciplinary communication, with the second cohort receiving additional content on the topic. At semester completion, students presented a research project at an interdisciplinary poster session. Assessment. Self-, peer-, and faculty evaluations (4 items; 5-point Likert-type) assessing self-confidence and actual interdisciplinary communication skills were completed during the poster session. Overall, students responded they were "very confident" or "extremely confident" regarding the skills, with greater confidence reported by the second cohort. Faculty members agreed that students exhibited effective interdisciplinary communication skills, with stronger agreement for the second cohort. Conclusion. Including interdisciplinary education and experiences in a curriculum increases students' interdisciplinary communication skills. Using multiple interdisciplinary experiences may result in greater increases in these skills.


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Comunicación Interdisciplinaria , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Adulto Joven
10.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(4): 51, 2015 May 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26089560

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pharmacy student perceptions of team-based learning (TBL) vs traditional lecture-based learning formats. METHODS: First professional year pharmacy students (N=111) at two universities used TBL in different courses during different semesters (fall vs spring). Students completed a 22-item team perceptions instrument before and after the fall semester. A 14-item teaching style preference instrument was completed at the end of the spring semester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: Students who experienced TBL in the fall and went back to traditional format in the spring reported improved perceptions of teams and preferred TBL format over a traditional format more than students who experienced a traditional format followed by TBL. Students at both universities agreed that the TBL format assists with critical-thinking, problem-solving, and examination preparation. Students also agreed that teams should consist of individuals with different personalities and learning styles. CONCLUSION: When building teams, faculty members should consider ways to diversify teams by considering different views, perspectives, and strengths. Offering TBL early in the curriculum prior to traditional lecture-based formats is better received by students, as evidenced by anecdotal reports from students possibly because it allows students time to realize the benefits and assist them in building teamwork-related skills.


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Solución de Problemas , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Procesos Mentales , Personalidad , Autoinforme , Factores Socioeconómicos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
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