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1.
Alcohol Res ; 42(1): 08, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35548267

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Alcohol and marijuana are commonly used by young adults, and use of both substances, particularly at the same time, is prevalent among this population. Understanding the prevalence, patterns, correlates, and consequences of simultaneous alcohol and marijuana (SAM) use is important to inform interventions. However, this literature is complicated by myriad terms used to describe SAM use, including use with overlapping effects and same-day co-use. OBJECTIVES: This scoping review identifies and describes the peer-reviewed literature focused on SAM use by young adults and distinguishes simultaneous use from same-day co-use of alcohol and marijuana. This review also provides a narrative summary of the prevalence of SAM use, patterns of SAM and other substance use, psychosocial correlates, and consequences of SAM use. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: This review is limited to papers written in English and published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2000 and August 2021. It includes papers assessing simultaneous use or same-day co-use of alcohol and marijuana among young adults ages 18 to 30. Review papers, qualitative interviews, experimental lab studies, policy work, toxicology or medical reports, and papers focused on neurological outcomes are excluded. SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science databases were searched. Databases were selected and the search strategy developed in consultation with an information specialist. CHARTING METHODS: A data charting form was utilized to specify which information would be extracted from included papers. Eight categories of data were extracted: (1) research questions and hypotheses; (2) sample characteristics; (3) study procedures; (4) definition of SAM use; (5) prevalence of SAM use; (6) patterns of SAM and other substance use; (7) psychosocial correlates of SAM use; and (8) consequences of SAM use. RESULTS: A total of 1,282 papers were identified through initial search terms. Through double-blind title/abstract screening and full-text review, the review was narrowed to 74 papers that met review inclusion criteria. Review of these papers demonstrated that SAM use was prevalent among young adults, particularly among those who reported heavier quantities and more frequent use of alcohol and marijuana. Enhancement-related motives for use were consistently positively associated with SAM use. SAM use was associated with greater perceived positive and negative consequences of alcohol and/or marijuana use. Inconsistencies in prevalence, patterns, correlates, and consequences were found between studies, which may be due to large variations in measurement of SAM use, populations studied, methodological design (e.g., cross-sectional vs. intensive longitudinal), and the covariates included in models. CONCLUSIONS: The literature on simultaneous use and same-day co-use of alcohol and marijuana has expanded rapidly. Of the 74 included papers (61 on SAM use; 13 on same-day co-use), 60 papers (47 on SAM use; 13 on same-day co-use) were published within the last 5 years. Future research focusing on the ways in which SAM use confers acute risk, above and beyond the risks associated with separate consumption of alcohol and marijuana, is needed for understanding potential targets for intervention.

2.
Addict Behav ; 132: 107367, 2022 May 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35584555

RESUMEN

STUDY OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of sleep duration on next-day alcohol and cannabis craving and use among young adults. METHOD: A community sample of young adults who reported recent simultaneous alcohol and cannabis use at screening (N = 409; Mage = 21.61; 50.9% female) completed twice daily surveys (morning and afternoon) for five 14-day sampling bursts (i.e., 70 days total). Daily measurements included sleep duration, alcohol and cannabis craving, and alcohol and cannabis use (i.e., number of drinks, hours high). Multilevel models enabled examining associations between sleep duration and substance use/craving at three distinct levels: daily-level, burst-level, and person-level. RESULTS: At the day-level, sleep duration was inversely associated with craving for both alcohol and cannabis: Stronger craving was reported on mornings and afternoons after relatively shorter sleep duration. At the burst-level, sleep duration was inversely associated with morning and afternoon alcohol craving indicating stronger alcohol craving, but not cannabis craving, during two-week periods when young adults have accumulated shorter sleep duration. Pertaining to alcohol and cannabis use, no daily-level effects were found, but the burst-level effect showed that participants engaged in greater alcohol use during two-week bursts with shorter sleep duration. CONCLUSIONS: Based on a non-clinical sample of young adults reporting substance use, results suggest shorter sleep duration may be a modifiable risk factor as it pertains to substance use and cravings. Results highlight day-level effects of shorter sleep duration on substance use cravings and adverse effects of cumulative sleep deficit on alcohol use.

3.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35102692

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented young adults with novel challenges and disruptions to several life domains. The current study examined how COVID-19-related stressors (i.e., job-related, financial-related, social/relational, and illness-related stressors) relate to young adults' symptoms of depression and anxiety, and satisfaction with life (in the US). In Aim 1, we examined associations between COVID-19-related stressors and indices of mental health and well-being in the initial phase of the pandemic (April/May 2020) while accounting for participants' pre-pandemic levels of these outcomes in January of 2020 (N = 519; Mage = 25.4; 62.8% women). Social/relational stressors were most strongly associated with increased symptoms of anxiety/depression, and financial stressors were most strongly associated with decreased satisfaction with life. Extending this research longitudinally (Aim 2), we sampled young adults bi-monthly across a year-long period (September 2020 to August 2021). Multilevel models revealed within-person associations between each stressor domain and mental health/well-being; young adults reported more symptoms of depression/anxiety and lower satisfaction with life in months that stressors were relatively more salient. Interactions between stressors and time revealed associations were generally stronger in earlier months and decreased linearly across the pandemic. Taken together, longitudinal evidence indicates that COVID-19-related stressors, especially social/relational stressors, have direct and time-varying associations with mental health and well-being.

4.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 230: 109205, 2022 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34890928

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Subjective ratings of cannabis effects are important predictors of use-related consequences. However, psychometric research is fairly limited, particularly for measures to capture variability in daily life when diverse modes of cannabis administration and co-substance use are common. METHODS: This study evaluated the predictive utility of a revised item to assess perceived cannabis effects and examined modes of cannabis administration and alcohol and nicotine co-use as moderators. Participants were 106 young adults (18-25 years; 51% female) who completed up to 14 consecutive daily reports of substance use (n = 1405 person-days). Two measures of subjective effects were examined: a standard item (0-100 rating of "how high do you feel?") and a revised item that uses four crowd-sourced anchor points ranging from relaxed (0), calm/chill (33), high (67), and stoned/baked (100). The items shared substantial variance (Pseudo-R2 = 59.5%), however, the revised item showed greater within-person variability (77.0% vs. 68.8%) and stronger day-level associations with consumption levels (Pseudo-R2 = 25.0% vs. 16.7%). RESULTS: The cannabis consumption-subjective effects link was weaker on blunt-only days compared to vape-only days. Subjective cannabis effects were higher on nicotine co-use days after controlling for cannabis consumption; neither alcohol nor nicotine co-use moderated the cannabis consumption-subjective effects link. DISCUSSION: The revised subjective cannabis effects item is a viable alternative to the standard item among young adults who engage in simultaneous alcohol and cannabis use. CONCLUSIONS: Future research focused on characterizing the variability in cannabis effects is needed.


Asunto(s)
Cannabis , Alucinógenos , Agonistas de Receptores de Cannabinoides , Etanol , Femenino , Humanos , Lenguaje , Masculino , Adulto Joven
5.
Am J Prev Med ; 62(2): 275-284, 2022 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34736801

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease, and stroke are the 5 leading causes of death in the U.S. The objective of this review is to examine the economic value of prevention interventions addressing these 5 conditions. METHODS: Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry data were queried from 2010 to 2018 for interventions that addressed any of the 5 conditions in the U.S. Results were stratified by condition, prevention stage, type of intervention, study sponsorship, and study perspective. The analyses were conducted in 2020, and all costs were reported in 2019 dollars. RESULTS: In total, 549 cost-effectiveness analysis studies examined interventions addressing these 5 conditions in the U.S. Tertiary prevention interventions were assessed in 61.4%, whereas primary prevention was assessed in 8.6% of the studies. Primary prevention studies were predominantly funded by government, whereas industry sources funded more tertiary prevention studies, especially those dealing with pharmaceutical interventions. The median incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the 5 conditions combined was $68,500 per quality-adjusted life year. Median incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were lowest for primary prevention and highest for tertiary prevention. DISCUSSION: Primary prevention may be more cost effective than secondary and tertiary prevention interventions; however, research investments in primary prevention interventions, especially by industry, lag in comparison. These findings help to highlight the gaps in the cost-effectiveness analysis literature related to the 5 leading causes of death and identify understudied interventions and prevention stages for each condition.


Asunto(s)
Accidente Cerebrovascular , Causas de Muerte , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Humanos , Prevención Primaria , Años de Vida Ajustados por Calidad de Vida
6.
J Am Coll Health ; 70(2): 335-339, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32343207

RESUMEN

Objective It is not well understood whether heavy drinking interferes with academics on specific days or if this relationship simply reflects between-student differences. Participants: N = 736 college students completed 14 consecutive daily assessments during 7 semesters. Methods: Days were classified as non-drinking, moderate drinking, heavy episodic drinking only (HED-only), or high-intensity drinking (HID) days. Multilevel models tested associations between drinking level and academic behaviors. Results: Students were more likely to skip class after engaging in HED-only or HID the previous day. On weekdays, students spent more time on schoolwork when they did not drink the previous day and spent less time on schoolwork when they engaged in HED-only and HID the previous day. On weekends, students spent less time on schoolwork after HED-only days. Conclusions: Heavy drinking is associated with lower academic effort the next day, highlighting the need for college programs targeting heavy alcohol use prevention and daily decision making.

7.
Exp Clin Psychopharmacol ; 30(2): 151-158, 2022 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33591776

RESUMEN

Young adults' subjective feelings of alcohol's effects are a key predictor of engagement in risky behavior such as deciding whether to drive after drinking. To best inform prevention messaging and tailor intervention techniques that target high-risk drinking, it is critical that our measurement best captures subjective feelings. Standard sliding scales (0-100 rating of, "how drunk do you feel?") may have some challenges with distinguishing between levels of subjective responses to alcohol. The current daily diary study compared the utility of the standard sliding scale to a newly developed sliding scale that uses contemporary, crowd-sourced language from young adults as evenly spaced anchors (slightly buzzed, tipsy/"happy," drunk, and wasted) along a continuum of subjective effects of alcohol. Participants were 154 young adult substance users (58% women) who completed up to 14 consecutive daily reports of their substance use behavior. The four-anchored sliding scale performed similarly well as the standard scale in predicting alcohol use outcomes while showing the advantages of recording higher mean values/standard deviations and demonstrating that participants used the anchors to denote varying degrees of subjective effects. Findings suggest that the four-anchored subjective alcohol effects sliding scale is a viable alternative to the standard scale. By providing evenly spaced anchors that reflect incremental differences in language young adults use to describe their subjective states, the proposed scale may provide a guide for participants to indicate how they feel after drinking and may better capture variability in alcohol's effects. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Intoxicación Alcohólica , Alcoholismo , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Etanol , Femenino , Humanos , Lenguaje , Masculino , Adulto Joven
8.
Psychol Addict Behav ; 36(1): 67-77, 2022 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34472879

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: As cannabis products are becoming increasingly available and young adults are increasingly using vaporizers to consume cannabis, there is a need to understand how this population is using different modes of administration and the extent to which specific modes are associated with differential cannabis use outcomes. Toward this end, the current study characterized predictors of cannabis mode of administration and examined how consumption levels and subjective intoxication vary as a function of mode of administration in daily life. METHOD: Participants were 106 young adult cannabis and heavy alcohol users (51% female) who completed up to 14 daily diaries (n = 1,405 person days). Each day, participants reported whether they used any cannabis and, if any, which mode(s) were used, number of hits used per mode, overall subjective intoxication, and the socio-environmental context in which they used cannabis. RESULTS: Across all cannabis use days, Bong-Only and Vape-Only days were the most common, followed by Multimode, Joint-, Pipe-, and Blunt-Only days. Participants reporting a greater proportion of cannabis use days were more likely to report Bong-Only and Multimode days than Vape-Only days. Compared to Vape-Only days, participants reported fewer hits on Bong-Only days and more hits on Blunt-Only, Pipe-Only, and Multimode days. Participants felt more intoxicated on Bong-Only days than Vape-Only days. CONCLUSIONS: Mode-specific associations with cannabis consumption and subjective intoxication levels suggest assessing modes of administration may be a meaningful way to guide individual and public health intervention efforts. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Cannabis , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Analgésicos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
9.
Addict Behav ; 124: 107120, 2022 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34560423

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Pre-gaming, or drinking before going out, is common among young adults and associated with heavier drinking and negative consequences. However, findings have been mixed as to whether a unique, day-level association between pre-gaming and negative consequences exists independent of alcohol intake. It is also unknown whether young adults experience more positive consequences of alcohol use on days they engage in pre-gaming. This study tested day-level associations between pre-gaming and positive and negative consequences, controlling for same-day alcohol intake, as well as whether these associations were moderated by person- and day-level variables. METHODS: Participants were 148 young adult heavy drinkers (Mage = 20.30, SDage = 1.45, 57.4% female) who reported past-month simultaneous alcohol and marijuana use. For up to 14 consecutive days, participants completed electronic surveys asking about their drinking behaviors and consequences the previous day. RESULTS: Prior to adjusting for alcohol intake, Poisson multilevel models showed that participants reported more negative and positive consequences on days they pre-gamed and those who reported pre-gaming more often throughout the study also experienced more negative and positive consequences overall. After controlling for alcohol intake, a positive, day-level association between pre-gaming and positive consequences remained. There was no evidence of moderation of study associations by person- or day-level variables. CONCLUSION: The unique association between pre-gaming and positive consequences may help explain why pre-gaming is linked with heavy drinking and other risky behaviors as positive consequences have been shown to reinforce such behaviors. Findings suggest pre-gaming may be a useful intervention point for alcohol reduction programs.


Asunto(s)
Intoxicación Alcohólica , Fumar Marihuana , Uso de la Marihuana , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Etanol , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Masculino , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
10.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 45(12): 2546-2559, 2021 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34932227

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Day drinking, or drinking during the daytime, is a term used colloquially in the media and among college students based on anecdotal evidence. Drinking at tailgate parties, generally thought to be a type of day drinking, tends to be particularly heavy and to achieve levels comparable to drinking on holidays and special occasions. The objective of this study was to assess how many and how often students day drink and whether day drinking days (i.e., days drinking began before 4:00 p.m.) were associated with heavy drinking, legal intoxication, negative alcohol-related consequences, and three risky substance use behaviors. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal daily diary study of college students who were followed for their first seven semesters of college. The analytic sample includes 7,633 drinking days nested with 619 student drinkers. We used logistic and Poisson multilevel models to test associations between day drinking days and substance use outcomes and negative consequences. RESULTS: Approximately 50% of drinkers drank durinng the day at least once, and day drinking occurred on 9% of drinking days. Greek organization participants reported significantly more day drinking days than non-participants. Day drinking days were characterized by heavy drinking as evidenced by strong, positive associations between day drinking and drinking to heavy episodic drinking (HED) and high-intensity drinking (HID) thresholds on a given day. In contrast, students were less likely to reach legal intoxication and experienced fewer negative alcohol-related consequences on day drinking days than days on which drinking began in the evening or nighttime. Students who reported day drinking more often throughout the study also reported having more days of drinking at the HED and HID thresholds and playing drinking games and mixed alcohol with energy drinks more frequently. CONCLUSIONS: Day drinking was common among this sample of college students. Findings suggest that day drinking days may be characterized by heavy drinking and may be a behavior most typically engaged in by heavy drinkers, including members of Greek organizations.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Intoxicación Alcohólica/epidemiología , Actitud Frente a la Salud , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Intoxicación Alcohólica/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Factores Sexuales , Estudiantes/psicología , Universidades , Adulto Joven
11.
Drug Alcohol Rev ; 38(3): 302-305, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31553497

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: High-intensity drinking (HID), or consuming 8+ (10+) drinks in one sitting for women (men), is associated with significant harm. We compared the likelihood of individuals using protective behavioural strategies (PBS) on days with varying levels of drinking (HID, heavy episodic-only drinking [4-7/5-9 drinks for women/men], moderate drinking [1-3/1-4 drinks]). DESIGN AND METHODS: We used an intensive repeated measures longitudinal design with four 14-day measurement bursts across 2 years (N = 258 university students [50.0% female, average age of 19.95 (SD = 0.41) years] who provided 3176 daily drinking reports). Each drinking day, participants reported the amount of alcohol consumed and whether they used PBS. RESULTS: Multilevel models indicated that, relative to heavy episodic drinking-only days, students were more likely to use strategies of avoiding drinking too quickly on moderate drinking days (odds ratio = 1.90, confidence interval 1.50-2.40) but less likely on HID days (odds ratio = 0.38, confidence interval 0.29-0.48). Relative to heavy episodic drinking-only days, students were less likely to use strategies to protect themselves from serious harm on moderate days (odds ratio = 0.53, confidence interval 0.41-0.67) and equally likely on HID days (odds ratio = 0.84, confidence interval 0.93-1.41). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Despite elevated risk for alcohol-related harms when drinking most heavily, PBS may be under-utilised on higher-risk drinking occasions. In light of prior work supporting the effectiveness of PBS at reducing harms on HID days, increasing PBS should be emphasised in future prevention and intervention efforts.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Estudios Longitudinales , New England/epidemiología , Estudiantes , Universidades , Adulto Joven
12.
J Child Fam Stud ; 28(1): 116-130, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31354225

RESUMEN

Youth who suffer from psychiatric disorders are at high risk for negative outcomes, including aggression and substance abuse. Although many youth with psychiatric disorders have endured harsh parenting and/or child maltreatment (CM), differential associations between these experiential factors have yet to be fully explored. Sleep problems have also been implicated in psychiatric disorders and are consistently associated with CM. The overlap and unique contributions of CM and sleep problems to the mental health of youth remains unclear; longitudinal studies from late childhood into adolescence, when psychiatric illnesses frequently onset, are rare. The current longitudinal study examined associations of CM, harsh parenting, and sleep problems with symptoms of four psychiatric disorders: Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Anxiety, and Depression. Early adolescent youth with no history of substance use (N = 529) were sampled from a working class, medium-sized city in northern Kentucky, and an extensive battery of tests were administered to youth and a parent. CM was more strongly and consistently related to psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline than was harsh parenting. Reports of harsh parenting were more strongly associated with externalizing symptoms than internalizing symptoms. Sleep problems were also positively associated with psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline, but did not exacerbate the effects of CM or harsh parenting on symptom counts. Longitudinally, harsh parenting was more predictive of change in psychiatric symptoms two to three years later than was CM. The potential significance of childhood adversity and sleep problems for prevention of later mental health problems are discussed.

13.
Prev Sci ; 20(3): 342-352, 2019 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29516357

RESUMEN

College drinking and its negative consequences remain a major public health concern. Yet, many prevention efforts targeting college drinkers are expensive, are difficult to implement, use indicated approaches targeting only high-risk drinkers, and/or are only marginally effective. An alternative strategy taken explicitly or implicitly by many colleges is campus-led alcohol-free programming which provides students with attractive leisure alternatives to drinking on weekend nights. This study aimed to extend work by Patrick et al. (Prevention Science, 11, 155-162, 2010), who found that students drank less on weekend nights they attended LateNight Penn State (LNPS) activities during their first semester of college. Here, daily diary and longitudinal data on college students' daily lives and risk behaviors were collected from 730 students on 19,506 person-days across seven semesters at a large university in the Northeastern United States. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate alcohol and illegal substance use on weekend days as a function of LNPS attendance, gender, legal drinking status (≥ 21 years), and day of the weekend. Across college, students who attended LNPS used alcohol and illegal substances less in general and less on days they participated compared to themselves on days they did not participate. Legal drinking status moderated the association between LNPS attendance and alcohol and illegal substance use such that levels of use were lowest for students under 21 years old on weekend days they attended LNPS. Our findings provide support for campus-led alcohol-free programming as a potential harm reduction strategy on college campuses.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Estudiantes/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Universidades , Adulto , Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad , Humanos , Consumo de Alcohol en Menores , Adulto Joven
14.
Psychol Addict Behav ; 32(8): 904-913, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30359044

RESUMEN

Heavy episodic drinking (HED) is prevalent among college students and associated with harms. However, many students engage in "high-intensity drinking" (HID) by drinking at thresholds beyond HED. HID relative to HED-only is associated with elevated risk for acute and severe negative consequences. When used, protective behavioral strategies (PBS) are shown to help drinkers limit their drinking and lower their odds of experiencing consequences. This study assessed whether PBS use was associated with reduced consequences on occasions college students engaged in HID relative to HED-only. Data were from a longitudinal measurement-burst design (14-day bursts across 4 semesters) from 256 college students who engaged in HID on at least 1 reported day, yielding 2,352 daily drinking reports. Participants reported the number of standard drinks consumed on each day and, on days with 1+ drinks, whether they used PBS and experienced a variety of negative drinking-related consequences. Three-level multilevel models revealed that on days when students used manner of drinking PBS there was a weaker association between HID and passing out from drinking. On days students used serious harm reduction PBS there was a weaker association of HID with having no one sober enough to drive and experiencing regretted sexual behaviors. Use of some PBS may help college students reduce harms on HID occasions relative to HED-only occasions. Interventions should promote use of planning strategies to minimize harm, especially on HID occasions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/efectos adversos , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Estudiantes , Adolescente , Femenino , Reducción del Daño , Humanos , Masculino , Análisis Multinivel , Prevalencia , Universidades , Adulto Joven
15.
Addict Behav ; 76: 275-280, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28886576

RESUMEN

College students who perceive their parents to hold permissive views about their alcohol use engage in heavier drinking. However, few studies have assessed perceived parental permissibility of alcohol use (PPP) longitudinally across the later college years, and few have assessed variation in changes in PPP and whether or not these changes differentially predict drinking. This study assessed whether PPP changed across college and used two approaches to determine whether PPP predicted binge drinking frequency and peak drinking. Data on college students' daily lives and risk behaviors were collected from 687 students (51% female) in a large university in the Northeast United States over four years. Perceived parental permissibility of alcohol use increased from the last year of high school through the third year of college with males reporting significantly higher PPP by the third year of college. From 12th grade through the third year of college, between-person differences in mean PPP were positively associated with binge drinking frequency and peak drinking, and patterns of PPP change differentially predicted both drinking outcomes through fourth year. These findings suggest that PPP is a dynamic construct that may evidence important developmental changes across college and the transition to adulthood. More broadly, the results indicate that aspects of the parent-child relationship continue to change after high school and may be important as they are linked with college student risk behaviors.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Relaciones Padres-Hijo , Padres/psicología , Tolerancia , Estudiantes/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , New England , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
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