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1.
J Gen Intern Med ; 2019 Sep 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31515736

RESUMEN

AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a team training program to support shared mental model (SMM) development in interprofessional rounds. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A three-arm randomized controlled trial study was conducted for interprofessional teams of 207 health profession learners who were randomized into three groups. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The full team training program included a didactic training part on cognitive tools and a virtual simulation to support clinical teamwork in interprofessional round. Group 1 was assigned to the full program, group 2 to the didactic part, and group 3 (control group) with no intervention. The main outcome measure was team performance in full scale simulation. Secondary outcome was interprofessional attitudes. PROGRAM EVALUATION: Teamwork performance and interprofessional attitude scores of the full intervention group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group. The two intervention groups had significantly higher (P < 0.05) attitude scores on interprofessional teamwork compared with the control group. DISCUSSION: Our study indicates the need of both cognitive tools and experiential learning modalities to foster SMM development for the delivery of optimal clinical teamwork performances. Given its scalability and practicality, we anticipate a greater role for virtual simulations to support interprofessional team training.

2.
Nurse Educ Today ; 81: 64-71, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31330404

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Collaborative learning in interprofessional team care delivery across different healthcare courses and institutions is constrained by geographical locations and tedious scheduling. Three dimensional virtual environments (3D-VE) are a viable and innovative tool to bring diverse healthcare students to learn together. AIM: The aim of this study is to describe the development of a 3D-VE and to evaluate healthcare students' experiences of their collaborative learning in the environment. METHOD: A mixed methods study design was employed. Participants from six healthcare courses (Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, and Medical Social Work) were recruited from three institutions to form six interprofessional teams to participate in team care delivery via a 3D-VE. Pre- and post-tests were conducted to evaluate the students' attitudes toward healthcare teams and interprofessional collaboration. Four focus groups were conducted with 27 healthcare students after they completed questionnaires to evaluate their perceived usability, the sociability of computer-supported collaborative learning, and senses of presence. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULT: The students demonstrated significant improvements in their attitudes toward healthcare teams (p < 0.05) and interprofessional collaboration (p < 0.001) after the collaborative learning. Four themes emerged from the focus group discussions: "feeling real", whereby the students felt immersed in their own roles; the virtual environment was perceived as "less threatening" compared to face-to-face interactions; "understanding each other's roles" among different healthcare professionals; and there were some "technical hiccups" related to sound quality and navigation. The participants reported positively on the usability (mean 3.48, SD 0.64), feasibility (mean 3.39, SD 0.60) and perceived sense of presence (mean 107.24, SD 17.78) of the 3D-VE in supporting collaborative learning. CONCLUSION: Given its flexibility, practicality, and scalability, this 3D-VE serves as a promising tool for collaborative learning across different healthcare courses and institutions in preparing for future collaborative-ready workforces.

3.
Int J Med Inform ; 120: 172-178, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30409342

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Measuring adherence to processes is one of the established ways to quantify the quality of healthcare. Providing timely feedback to healthcare workers on the level of adherence can improve process measures. However, it is challenging to present data on adherence to repetitive time-sensitive tasks in a clear manner. OBJECTIVES: We used inpatient glucose monitoring as a test case to explore the feasibility of using visualizations to communicate adherence to repetitive scheduled tasks to healthcare workers. METHODS: We selected four candidate plots that represented distribution across time: histogram, probability density function plot (pdf plot), violin plot and cumulative density function plot (cdf plot). Doctors and nurses involved in inpatient diabetes care in a tertiary hospital were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire that measured self-reported baseline knowledge, performance, and perception towards the visualizations. Performance was assessed by determining if a participant was able to correctly identify visualizations representing protocol adherence. We also assessed the perception of usability of these visualizations for monitoring protocol adherence. Binomial regression models were used to identify factors associated with overall performance and perception. Logistic regression models with generalized estimating equation were used to compare performance and perception between visualizations, and identify effect modifiers. RESULTS: A total of 57 doctors and nurses completed the questionnaire. Participants were most familiar with histogram (87.7%), followed by cdf plot (61.4%), pdf plot (40.4%), and violin plot (7%). However, the percentages of participants who identified non-adherence using these plots were generally lower, ranging from 29.8% to 40.4%. Participants' perception of usability ranged from 14% to 17.5% across these visualizations. More favorable perceptions were found among participants with baseline knowledge for two or more visualizations (adjusted odds ratio: 3.21; 95%CI: 1.29, 7.96; p-value: 0.012) and having identified two or more non-adherent visualizations (adjusted odds ratio: 4.23; 95%CI: 1.95, 9.16; p-value: < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to repetitive time-sensitive tasks can be presented in the form of visualizations. However, nurses' and doctors' knowledge and understanding of these visualizations are generally poor. This may influence their perception of usability of these plots. Therefore, these visualizations need to be implemented in tandem with training on their interpretation, to enhance the usefulness of these plots in motivating quality improvement.

4.
Nurse Educ Today ; 67: 1-5, 2018 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29704800

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The shortage of nurses has become a global phenomenon, and methods of decreasing the attrition rate of nurses have been explored. Resilience was one of the important factors that increased the retention rate of nurses who stayed in this highly stressful profession. OBJECTIVES: To understand how undergraduate nursing students perceive and experience their clinical placements and to identify the factors that helped them build resilience. DESIGN: A qualitative design utilizing focus group interviews was adopted for this study. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen third- and fourth-year undergraduate nursing students in a Bachelor of Nursing program participated in this study. SETTING: This study was conducted at a local university in Singapore. METHOD: Four audio-taped focus group interviews were conducted. RESULTS: Students reported that they were stressed while facing challenges head-on during their first clinical placements, mainly due to a lack of peer and clinical support. Gradually, students built resilience overtime and were able to adapt to the ward culture through peer support and reframing coping strategies. CONCLUSION: Nursing students gradually built resilience after accumulating experiences from their clinical placements. Although they eventually adapted well, peer, clinical, and informational support during clinical placements were lacking. Resilience programs that teach positive coping strategies and mindfulness training could be implemented in the undergraduate nursing curriculum.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería , Preceptoría/métodos , Resiliencia Psicológica , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica , Femenino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Masculino , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación Cualitativa , Singapur , Adulto Joven
5.
J Nurs Scholarsh ; 50(3): 324-332, 2018 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29608245

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although teamwork and interprofessional collaboration are critical to patient safety, nursing, medical, and allied health graduates often feel ill-prepared to confidently communicate and collaborate with other team members. While interprofessional education (IPE) has been advocated as a way of addressing this issue, there are multiple barriers to its systematic and sustained integration in undergraduate healthcare programs. Despite these challenges, examples of effective IPE initiatives have emerged. INNOVATION: This article profiles seven case studies of innovative interprofessional education activities that have been successfully implemented across five countries, for a variety of learners, using different delivery modalities, and with evaluation results attesting to their success. CONCLUSIONS: The case studies demonstrate innovative ideas that have the potential to overcome some of the barriers to IPE through the use of creative and targeted approaches. This article provides a wealth of ideas for the successful design and implementation of IPE initiatives and will be of benefit to educators wishing to expand their repertoire of teaching approaches. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A body of research attests to the relationship between interprofessional communication, teamwork, and patient outcomes. IPE is imperative for facilitating the development of nursing graduates' communication and teamwork skills; however, innovative approaches are needed to overcome the perceived and actual impediments to its implementation.

6.
J Clin Nurs ; 27(1-2): 257-268, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28514505

RESUMEN

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To understand the perceptions of critical care nurses towards providing end-of-life care. BACKGROUND: There has been an increasing interest in end-of-life care in the critical care setting. In Singapore, approximately half of deaths in the hospital occur during critical care. While nurses are well positioned to provide end-of-life care to patients and their family members, they faced barriers to providing end-of-life care. Also, providing end-of-life care has profound positive and negative psychological effects on nurses, with the latter being more prominent. DESIGN: Qualitative descriptive design. METHOD: Data collection was performed in a medical intensive care unit of a public tertiary hospital in Singapore. Ten registered nurses were purposively sampled and interviewed individually using a semi-structured interview guide. A codebook was developed to guide coding, and data were thematically analysed. Rigour was maintained. RESULTS: Nurses went through a trajectory of experience. They experienced the culture of care and developed dissatisfaction with it. The tension shaped their perception and meaning of life and death, and they developed mechanisms to reach resolution. CONCLUSION: This study provides insight on nurses' perception as a trajectory of experience and raised several implications on clinical practice, policy and research. There is a need to alleviate the tension nurses face and to facilitate coming to terms with the tension by improving the culture of care and supporting nurses. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses could be involved more in decision-making and empowered to start end-of-life care conversations within the team and with family members. Communication with family members and between nurses and doctors could be improved. Support for nurses providing end-of-life care could be enhanced through promoting social networks, education and bereavement support. Further research is needed to explore ways to support and empower nurses to provide end-of-life care in critical care.


Asunto(s)
Enfermería de Cuidados Críticos , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/psicología , Cuidado Terminal/psicología , Adulto , Toma de Decisiones , Emociones , Familia/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/organización & administración , Entrevistas como Asunto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación Cualitativa , Singapur
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 17(1): 72, 2017 Apr 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28449685

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: With the availability of more healthcare courses and an increased intake of nursing students, education institutions are facing challenges to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. The comparison of career choice influences and perception of nursing among healthcare students can provide information for recruitment strategies. An instrument to compare the influences of healthcare career choice is lacking. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument to compare the influences of healthcare career choice with perceptions of nursing as a career choice. METHODS: The study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, two sets of scales with parallel items that measure the influences of healthcare career choice and perceptions of nursing as a career choice were developed through an earlier qualitative study, literature review, and expert validation. Phase two involved testing the construct validity, concurrent validity and reliability with a convenience sample of 283 first year healthcare students who were recruited at two education institutions in Singapore. RESULTS: An exploratory factor analysis revealed 35-parallel items in a six-factor solution (personal interest, prior healthcare exposure, self-efficacy, perceived nature of work, job prospects, and social influences) that explained 59 and 64% of the variance for healthcare career choice and nursing as a career choice respectively. A high correlation (r = 0.76, p < 0.001) was obtained with an existing tool, confirming the concurrent validity. The internal consistency was sufficient with Cronbach's alpha of 0.93 for healthcare career choice and 0.94 for nursing as a career choice. The test-retest reliability was acceptable with an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.63 for healthcare career choice and 0.60 for nursing as a career choice. CONCLUSIONS: The instrument provides opportunities for understanding the differences between influences of healthcare career choice and perceptions of nursing as a career choice. This comparative understanding of career choice influences can guide educator and policy-makers on nursing recruitment.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Enfermería , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Psicometría , Singapur , Adulto Joven
8.
Nurse Educ Today ; 52: 66-72, 2017 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28267629

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Due to the ageing population and competition from other healthcare courses, a greater demand in the healthcare workforce has made it challenging for educational institutions to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. Understanding the considerations of students who have chosen non-nursing healthcare courses and their perceptions of nursing can help identify specific strategies to enhance the attractiveness of nursing course. This study aims to examine the differences between healthcare career choices and perceptions of nursing as a career choice among first-year non-nursing healthcare students. METHOD: A descriptive survey design was conducted at the beginning of the healthcare courses of seven healthcare groups and from four higher educational institutions in Singapore. A total of 451 students responded, yielding an overall response rate of 52.7%. The online survey was administered using a valid and reliable 35-item parallel scale, known as the Healthcare Career Choice and Nursing Career Choice. RESULTS: The participants perceived prior healthcare exposure as the most influential factor and self-efficacy as the least influential factor when choosing nursing as a career. In comparison to their own healthcare career choices, nursing was perceived to have greater gender stigma and, as nurses, they would be less likely to achieve higher qualifications and career advancements, and they would be less likely to enjoy fulfilling careers. They also perceived that they would be less likely to gain their parents' support to pursue nursing and to make their parents proud. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides educators and policy-makers with vital information to develop key strategies to improve nursing enrolment in educational institutions. These strategies include early exposure to nursing as a rewarding career during school years, addressing the issue of gender stigma, and promoting information on the career and educational advancement of a registered nurse to parents of school leavers.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Enfermería , Percepción Social , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Movilidad Laboral , Femenino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
9.
Nurse Educ Today ; 35(7): 894-9, 2015 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25819268

RESUMEN

The use of standardized patients for simulation-based learning was integrated into the Master of Nursing curriculum in the 2012-2013 academic year. The study aimed to explore the Master of Nursing students' experiences with and perceptions of using standardized patients in simulations, and to identify the students' learning needs in preparing to become advanced practice nurses. The study adopted an exploratory descriptive qualitative design, using a focus group interview. The study was conducted at a university in Singapore. Seven Master of Nursing students who were enrolled in the Acute Care Track of Master of Nursing program in the 2012-2013 academic year participated in the study. The data were gathered at the end of the first semester. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Three main categories - usefulness, clinical limitations, and realism - were identified in the study. The results revealed that the students felt using standardized patients was useful and realistic for developing skills in history taking, communication, and responding to an emergency situation. On the other hand, they found that the standardized patients were limited in providing critical signs and symptoms of case scenarios. To meet the learning objectives, future development and integration of standardized patients in the Master of Nursing curriculum might need to be considered along with the use of a high-fidelity simulator. This can be an alternative strategy to fill the gaps in each method. Obviously, using standardized patients for simulation-based learning has added value to the students' learning experiences. It is highly recommended that future studies explore the impact of using standardized patients on students' performance in clinical settings.


Asunto(s)
Enfermería de Práctica Avanzada/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería , Simulación de Paciente , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Adulto , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación Cualitativa , Singapur , Estudiantes de Enfermería
10.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 20(1): 32-8, 2014 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24580973

RESUMEN

A prospective, descriptive study was conducted in an acute care hospital in Singapore to determine the inter-rater reliability of the modified Morse Fall Scale by evaluating the degrees of agreement on the ratings of the individual items and overall score between the 'gold standard' assessor and the facility assessors. One hundred and forty-two subjects were recruited during the 1.5 month data collection period. The simple and weighted κ-values were all > 0.8 except for the item 'effects of medications' (κ and κw = 0.63), and the correlation coefficient (rs = 0.89) was significantly high at a significance level of < 0.001. The modified Morse Fall Scale was shown to be a reliable fall risk assessment tool having a relative high inter-rater reliability level for the overall score and individual items. This study provides evidence-based psychometric support for the clinical application of this tool.


Asunto(s)
Accidentes por Caídas , Hospitales Urbanos/organización & administración , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Singapur
11.
JBI Libr Syst Rev ; 10(1): 1-65, 2012.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27820206

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Clinical incident reporting is an integral feature of risk management system in the healthcare sector. By reporting clinical incidents, nurses allow for learning from errors, identification of error patterns and development of error preventive strategies. The need to understand attitudes to reporting, perceived barriers and incident reporting patterns by nurses are the core highlights of this review. OBJECTIVES: INCLUSION CRITERIA: This review considered descriptive quantitative studies that examined nurses' attitudes or perceived barriers towards incident reporting.The participants in this review were nurses working in acute care settings or step-down care settings. Studies that included non-nursing healthcare personnel were excluded.This review considered studies which examined nurses' attitudes towards incident reporting, perceived barriers and incident reporting practices.The outcomes of interest were the attitudes that nurses have towards incident reporting, perceived barriers and the types of reported incidents in correlation with nurses' attitudes and barriers. SEARCH STRATEGY: A three-step search strategy was utilised in this review. An initial limited search of CINAHL and MEDLINE was undertaken. Search strategies were then developed using identified keywords and index terms. Lastly, the reference lists of all identified articles were examined. All searches were limited to studies published in English, between 1991 and 2010. METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY: The studies were independently assessed by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Descriptive/ Case Series studies. DATA EXTRACTION: The reviewers extracted data independently from included studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute Data Extraction Form for Descriptive/ Case Series studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: Due to the descriptive nature of the study designs, statistical pooling was not possible. Therefore, the findings of this systematic review are presented in a narrative summary. MAIN FINDINGS: Fifty-five papers were identified from the searches based on their titles and abstracts. Nine studies were included in this review. Cultural and demographic factors were the most significant factors in affecting nurses' attitudes towards incident reporting. Major perceived barriers included fear, administrative issues, and the reporting process. Also, nurses were more likely to report incidents that caused direct harm, and if reporting was kept anonymous. CONCLUSIONS: This review demonstrated that attitudes of nurses towards incident reporting vary across different study settings, with perceived barriers hindering the reporting process. Using the findings, interventions can be customised to increase reporting rates can be developed to curb the problem of underreporting.A non-punitive culture towards incident reporting has to be cultivated, and nursing authorities should provide frequent positive feedback to staff who reported incidents. Investigating system errors should be the focus rather than individual blame.Further research should target the development and evaluation of strategies to increase rates of incident reporting. Any differences between actual and perceived reporting rates should also be explored.

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