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1.
Child Abuse Negl ; 129: 105670, 2022 May 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35569181

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Poly-victimization is common among youth experiencing homelessness (YEH) and youth in substance use treatment. To date, studies have not examined poly-victimization among these two intersecting populations. OBJECTIVE: To examine heterogeneity in lifetime victimization experiences among youth reporting homelessness at substance use treatment entry; identify demographic predictors of victimization class membership; and associations between victimization and clinical characteristics at treatment intake. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 1270 adolescents and young adults reporting past 90-day homelessness in a nationwide substance use treatment data set. METHODS: Latent Class Analysis (LCA) and logistic regression were used to examine heterogeneity in poly-victimization experiences, and associations with demographics and clinical characteristics for males and females. RESULTS: Four victimization classes emerged for males, and five victimization classes emerged for females. The prevalence of victimization and trauma characteristics were higher for females, except physical victimization, which was higher for males. Age, race/ethnicity, and sexual minority status were related to poly-victimization class membership, but not consistently across classes. Compared to low or single victimization classes, youth in the poly-victimization class had higher odds of post-traumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, and exchange sex (among females); Poly-victimization class membership was not associated with duration of recent homelessness or substance use disorder diagnoses, when compared to low/less complex victimization. CONCLUSION: High rates of lifetime victimization were found for YEH in substance use treatment, with rates generally higher among females. Trauma-informed interventions are needed to address complex victimization experiences and poor mental health among unstably housed youth in treatment.

2.
Addict Behav ; 132: 107358, 2022 May 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35552069

RESUMEN

U.S. veterans are at risk for insomnia, which often co-occurs with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use. Much of the research on veterans and these three constructs is cross-sectional and focused on unidirectional pathways. Recent theoretical and empirical evidence suggests a dynamic interplay between insomnia, PTSD, and alcohol use, yet few longitudinal studies exist. A clearer understanding of these pathways is needed to help inform integrated treatments. Using a sample of 1,230 post-9/11 veterans assessed over four time points across 12 months, we used a latent difference score modeling approach to examine proportional and dynamic change between insomnia, PTSD, and alcohol. Results revealed a complex interplay between all three constructs. Higher prior levels of both PTSD and alcohol use were associated with greater subsequent changes in insomnia symptoms (i.e., worse sleep). Moreover, although veterans drank less frequently as their insomnia symptoms worsened over time, greater changes in insomnia symptoms (i.e., worse symptoms) was a mechanism linking PTSD and more frequent drinking. As the research on interventions addressing insomnia, PTSD, and alcohol is limited, there are opportunities for researchers and clinicians to develop programs that effectively target all three in integrated treatments.

3.
LGBT Health ; 9(2): 114-121, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34918974

RESUMEN

Purpose: Young Black and Latino sexual minority men may experience multiple minority stressors, which may negatively impact behavioral health. To investigate this, longitudinal associations between multiple minority stressors and behavioral health outcomes were examined over a 2-year period. Methods: Data were from the Healthy Young Men's Cohort Study. The present study used five waves of data collected every 6 months from 2016 to 2019. Participants were young Black and/or Latino sexual minority men in Los Angeles, California (n = 448; aged 16-24). Participants self-reported their experiences of racial and homonegative discrimination, internalized homonegativity, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Latent growth curve models with time-varying covariates examined contemporaneous associations between minority stressors as well as general life stress and behavioral health measures. Results: After accounting for general life stress and demographic characteristics, racial discrimination was persistently associated with unhealthy alcohol use. Internalized homonegativity was associated with unhealthy alcohol use initially, but this association became non-significant over time. In models predicting depressive symptoms, racial discrimination was a significant predictor at early waves, and homonegative discrimination and internalized homonegativity emerged as significant predictors at later waves. Conclusion: These results help clarify which multiple minority stressors are more prominent in their relationship to young Black and Latino sexual minority men's unhealthy alcohol use and depressive symptoms. Interventions targeting multiple minority stressors may be needed at different times during young adulthood.


Asunto(s)
Racismo , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios de Cohortes , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritarios , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
4.
Addict Behav ; 124: 107087, 2022 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34464915

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Marijuana is the most frequently used illicit drug among college students, and there is a need to understand the social processes that contribute to young adults' marijuana use. Substance use behaviors tend to be more similar (homophilous) among individuals with social ties to one another. However, little is known about whether marijuana use homophily within young adult relationships is due to social selection (seeking out ties with similar marijuana use to one's own) or social influence (adopting similar marijuana use behaviors as one's ties), or both. METHODS: Students (N = 1,489; 54.6% female; Mage = 18.6 years) at one University completed online surveys in their first three semesters of college. Surveys assessed participant characteristics, marijuana use, and ties to up to 10 other students in the whole (sociocentric) network of first-year college students. Stochastic-actor oriented models (SAOMs) were used to analyze the co-evolution of marijuana use and social ties over time. RESULTS: Participants were more likely to select peers with similar past 30-day marijuana use as themselves. Concurrently, students' past 30-day marijuana use became more similar to their peers' use over time. DISCUSSION: Evidence for selection and influence effects were highly significant after controlling for network structure and other covariates indicating these processes may work in tandem to increase marijuana use homophily over the first year of college. This highlights the importance of relationships made early in the first-year of college, as these initial peer ties are likely to reinforce marijuana use behaviors that occur within these relationships.


Asunto(s)
Fumar Marihuana , Uso de la Marihuana , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Fumar Marihuana/epidemiología , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Grupo Paritario , Estudiantes , Universidades , Adulto Joven
5.
Addiction ; 116(8): 2116-2126, 2021 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33405314

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Several reports have documented risk factors for opioid use following treatment discharge, yet few have assessed sex differences, and no study has assessed risk using contemporary machine learning approaches. The goal of the present paper was to inform treatments for opioid use disorder (OUD) by exploring individual factors for each sex that are most strongly associated with opioid use following treatment. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) database with follow-ups at 3, 6 and 12 months post-OUD treatment discharge, exploring demographic, psychological and behavioral variables that predict post-treatment opioid use. SETTING: One hundred and thity-seven treatment sites across the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents (26.9%), young adults (40.8%) and adults (32.3%) in treatment for OUD. The sample (n = 1,126) was 54.9% male, 66.1% white, 20% Hispanic, 9.8% multi-race/ethnicity, 2.8% African American and 1.3% other. MEASUREMENT: Primary outcome was latency to opioid use over 1 year following treatment admission. RESULTS: For women, regularized Cox regression indicated that greater withdrawal symptoms [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.31], younger age (HR = 0.88), prior substance use disorder (SUD) treatment (HR = 1.11) and treatment resistance (HR = 1.11) presented the largest hazard for post-treatment opioid use, while a random survival forest identified and ranked substance use problems [variable importance (VI) = 0.007], criminal justice involvement (VI = 0.006), younger age (VI = 0.005) and greater withdrawal symptoms (VI = 0.004) as the greatest risk factors. For men, Cox regression indicated greater conduct disorder symptoms (HR = 1.34), younger age (HR = 0.76) and multiple SUDs (HR = 1.27) were most strongly associated with post-treatment opioid use, while a random survival forests ranked younger age (VI = 0.023), greater conduct disorder symptoms (VI = 0.010), having multiple substance use disorders (VI = 0.010) and criminal justice involvement (VI = 0.006) as the greatest risk factors. CONCLUSION: Risk factors for relapse to opioid use following opioid use disorder treatment appear to be, for women, greater substance use problems and withdrawal symptoms and, for men, younger age and histories of conduct disorder and multiple substance use disorder.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides , Síndrome de Abstinencia a Sustancias , Adolescente , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapéutico , Derecho Penal , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/tratamiento farmacológico , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/epidemiología , Caracteres Sexuales , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
6.
J Consult Clin Psychol ; 89(12): 995-1006, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35025540

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Many adolescents and young adults receiving substance use treatment have experienced or are at risk for homelessness. It is unknown whether specific treatment approaches are more or less effective for youth experiencing homelessness (YEH) compared to stably housed youth. The present study compared the effectiveness of the Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach, Motivational Enhancement Therapy combined with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (MET/CBT), and Treatment as Usual (TAU) for these two groups. Further subgroup differences were investigated by age, sex, and sexual and gender minority status. METHOD: YEH (n = 855) and a matched sample of stably housed youth (n = 855) were drawn from the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs, a nationwide substance use treatment data set. Multiple-group latent change score modeling was used to examine change in substance use frequency and related problems at baseline, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. RESULTS: Results indicated significant declines in substance use frequency and problems during treatment for all intervention groups. The TAU group showed the greatest declines in substance use problems during treatment and the greatest declines in frequency post-treatment. Compared to stably housed youth, YEH entered treatment with greater substance use and problems, and had greater declines in substance use in the MET/CBT group only. Other differences were found by age and sex. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, all three substance use interventions appear to be effective in reducing substance use and related problems. TAU and MET/CBT may be particularly effective for YEH in treatment settings. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Terapia Cognitivo-Conductual , Personas sin Hogar , Entrevista Motivacional , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Adolescente , Humanos , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/terapia , Adulto Joven
7.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 216: 108228, 2020 11 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32841812

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Substance use is common among youth experiencing homelessness (YEH). However, less is known about the use of multiple substances (polysubstance use), or factors associated with polysubstance use among YEH. The present study sought to identify subgroups of YEH based on their recent polysubstance use behavior, and investigate traumatic experiences, mental health and social network composition as predictors. METHODS: YEH (N = 1,032; Mage = 21.3) from three drop-in centers in Los Angeles completed an in-person survey and social network interview between October 2011 and June 2013. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of youth based on nine types of substance use in the past 30 days; latent class logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with class membership. RESULTS: Five polysubstance use classes were identified: heavy alcohol and marijuana (33.6 %), illicit drug use (4.9 %), high all polysubstance use (14.9 %), primarily marijuana (18.1 %), and low use (28.5 %). Relative to the low use class, traumatic experiences were associated with membership in every polysubstance use class. Suicide attempts were associated with membership in the high all class (OR = 9.41). Number of substance-using, homeless network members was associated with membership in the heavy alcohol and marijuana use class (OR = 1.35). Number of non-substance-using network members (homeless [OR = 0.29] and housed [OR = 0.73]) was associated with lower odds of membership in the high all class. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct groups of YEH can be identified by their recent polysubstance use patterns. Traumatic experiences, suicidality, and social network composition are important correlates of polysubstance use among YEH.


Asunto(s)
Jóvenes sin Hogar , Salud Mental , Red Social , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Cannabis , Femenino , Personas sin Hogar , Humanos , Análisis de Clases Latentes , Los Angeles , Masculino , Fumar Marihuana/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
8.
J Adolesc Health ; 66(4): 408-415, 2020 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32057607

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: A growing body of research has identified correlates (i.e., predictors) of youth homelessness. However, such risk and protective factors have not been identified for youth receiving substance use treatment. Using characteristics collected at treatment intake, the present study sought to identify predictors of youths' first episode of homelessness during the 12 months after substance use treatment entry. METHODS: Data come from a longitudinal study of adolescents (n = 17,911; aged 12-17 years) receiving substance use treatment throughout the U.S. Participants completed surveys at intake and at 3, 6, and 12 months later. Logistic regression and Lasso machine learning regression were used to predict participants' first episode of homelessness in the 12 months after treatment intake. RESULTS: After excluding adolescents reporting previous experiences of homelessness, 5.0% of adolescents reported their first episode of homelessness over the 12 months after treatment intake. The results from logistic and lasso models were generally consistent. Final models revealed that adolescents who were older, male, reported more victimization experiences, mental health problems, family problems, deviant peer relationships, and substance use problems (more treatment episodes and illicit drug dependence) were more likely to report experiencing homelessness. Hispanic/Latino adolescents were less likely to experience homelessness, compared with white adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: The results point to the important risk and protective factors that can be assessed at treatment entry to identify adolescents at greater risk of experiencing their first episode of homelessness.


Asunto(s)
Víctimas de Crimen/psicología , Personas sin Hogar/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/rehabilitación , Adolescente , Niño , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Salud Mental , Grupo Paritario , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Reino Unido
9.
Addict Behav ; 103: 106227, 2020 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31884375

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: First-generation college students are those whose parents have not completed a four-year college degree. The current study addressed the lack of research on first-generation college students' alcohol use by comparing the binge drinking trajectories of first-generation and continuing-generation students over their first three semesters. The dynamic influence of peer and parental social norms on students' binge drinking frequencies were also examined. METHODS: 1342 college students (n = 225 first-generation) at one private University completed online surveys. Group differences were examined at Time 1, and latent growth-curve models tested the association between first-generation status and social norms (peer descriptive, peer injunctive, parental injunctive) on binge drinking trajectories. RESULTS: Overall, binge drinking frequency tended to decline over the first three semesters of college. After controlling for demographics, substance-free dormitory residence, parental alcohol problems and norms, first-generation status was associated with steeper declines in binge drinking frequency. During the first semester, the association between parental injunctive norms and binge drinking frequency was stronger for first-generation students than for continuing-generation students; this influence declined over time for first-generation students. The influence of peer descriptive norms on binge drinking increased for continuing-generation students; while this influence remained stable over time for first-generation students. CONCLUSIONS: First-generation student status appears to be protective against binge drinking. Substance-free dormitory residence, and perceived parental and peer norms likely play a role in first-generation students' tendency to engage in binge drinking less often over the first year of college.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Responsabilidad Parental , Grupo Paritario , Normas Sociales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Padres/educación , Estudiantes/clasificación
10.
AIDS Behav ; 23(1): 161-174, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30088199

RESUMEN

Alcohol use is a key risk factor for HIV infection among MSM, in part because intoxication may interfere with the use of prevention methods like condoms. However, few studies have examined whether this is due to alcohol's pharmacological or expectancy effects or explored the specific aspects of sexual decision-making that may be affected. In this study, high-risk, heavy drinking MSM (N = 121) were randomly assigned to receive either (1) alcohol beverages, (2) placebo beverages, or (3) control beverages, before navigating a video-based sexual risk scenario that assessed several aspects of sexual decision-making. Results showed that condom use intentions and negotiation behaviors were lower among alcohol and placebo participants compared with controls, but that few significant differences emerged between the alcohol and placebo groups. These findings contrast with similar past studies, and suggest that alcohol's expectancy effects may play a role in sexual decision-making.


Asunto(s)
Intoxicación Alcohólica/psicología , Depresores del Sistema Nervioso Central/farmacología , Condones , Etanol/farmacología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Intención , Negociación , Conducta Sexual/efectos de los fármacos , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Causalidad , Toma de Decisiones , Homosexualidad Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Factores de Riesgo , Asunción de Riesgos , Sexo Seguro , Conducta Sexual/psicología , Sexo Inseguro , Adulto Joven
11.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs ; 79(6): 862-867, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30573016

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: There is a general perception on college campuses that alcohol use is normative. However, nondrinking students account for 40% of the U.S. college population. With much of the literature focusing on intervening among drinkers, there has been less of a focus on understanding the nondrinker college experience. The current study has two aims: to describe the social network differences between nondrinkers and drinkers in a college setting, and to assess perceived social exclusion among nondrinkers. METHOD: First-year U.S. college students (n = 1,342; 55.3% female; 47.7% non-Hispanic White) were participants in a larger study examining a social network of one college class and network associations with alcohol use. Alcohol use, sociocentric and egocentric network ties were assessed, as were experiences of social exclusion related to nondrinking. RESULTS: Drinking homophily based on past-month use was found; students tended to associate with others with a similar drinking status. Compared with drinkers, nondrinkers received fewer network nominations within the first-year network and made more nominations outside the first-year network. Nondrinkers' perceived social exclusion was positively related to the number of drinkers in their social networks, such that those with more drinkers in their network reported more social exclusion. CONCLUSIONS: College students' past-month drinking status in the first semester of college is related to their network position and perception of social exclusion. Nondrinking students who are part of a nondrinking community are less likely to feel socially excluded. Improving our understanding of the nondrinker college experience should improve support services for these students.


Asunto(s)
Abstinencia de Alcohol/psicología , Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Distancia Psicológica , Red Social , Estudiantes/psicología , Universidades/tendencias , Adolescente , Abstinencia de Alcohol/tendencias , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/tendencias , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Percepción/fisiología , Medio Social , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
12.
Psychol Addict Behav ; 32(8): 914-921, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30265059

RESUMEN

A burgeoning area of research is using social network analysis to investigate college students' substance use behaviors. However, little research has incorporated students' perceived peer drinking norms into these analyses. The present study investigated the association between social network characteristics, alcohol use, and alcohol-related consequences among first-year college students (N = 1,342; 81% of the first-year class) at one university. The moderating role of descriptive norms was also examined. Network characteristics and descriptive norms were derived from participants' nominations of up to 10 other students who were important to them; individual network characteristics included popularity (indegree), network expansiveness (outdegree), relationship reciprocity, and network density. Descriptive norms were defined as participants' average perceived binge drinking frequency among their nominated peers. Network autocorrelation models revealed that indegree and descriptive norms were positively associated with participants' average number of drinks per week, binge drinking frequency, and alcohol-related consequences. Indegree and outdegree interacted with descriptive norms, such that when participants perceived less frequent binge drinking among their peers, outdegree was associated with less alcohol consumption but not consequences. When participants perceived more frequent binge drinking among their peers, indegree and outdegree were associated with more alcohol consumption but not consequences. The present results suggest that being popular and believing that heavy episodic drinking is normative among one's peers are associated with greater alcohol risk. Further, alcohol risks associated with nominating more peers may be enhanced or lessened depending on students' peer drinking norms. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad , Grupo Paritario , Normas Sociales , Estudiantes , Adolescente , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Red Social , Universidades , Adulto Joven
13.
Addict Behav ; 84: 151-159, 2018 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29684764

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: College students with anxiety and depressive symptomatology face escalated risk for alcohol-related negative consequences. While it is well-established that normative perceptions of proximal peers' drinking behaviors influence students' own drinking behaviors, it is not clear how mental health status impacts this association. In the current study, we examined cross-sectional relationships between anxiety and depressed mood, perceived drinking behaviors and attitudes of important peers, and past month alcohol consumption and related problems in a first-semester college student social network. METHOD: Participants (N = 1254, 55% female, 47% non-Hispanic White) were first-year students residing on campus at a single university who completed a web-based survey assessing alcohol use, mental health, and social connections among first-year student peers. Network autocorrelation models were used to examine the independent and interactive associations between mental health and perceptions of close peers' drinking on drinking outcomes, controlling for important variables. RESULTS: Mental health interacted with perceptions to predict past-month drinking outcomes, such that higher anxiety and higher perceptions that peers drink heavily was associated with more drinks consumed and consequences, and higher depression and perceptions was associated with more drinks consumed, heavy drinking frequency, and consequences. Attitudes that peers approve of heavy drinking were associated with more drinks consumed and heavy drinking frequency among students with lower (vs. higher) depressed mood. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides strong evidence that perceiving that close peers drink heavily is particularly risk-enhancing for anxious and depressed college students, and offers implications about alcohol intervention targeted at these subgroups.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Normas Sociales , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Mental , Grupo Paritario , Riesgo , Red Social , Adulto Joven
14.
Addict Behav ; 79: 189-194, 2018 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29291510

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Heavy episodic drinking is common among college students and remains a serious public health issue. Previous event-level research among college students has examined behaviors and individual-level characteristics that drive consumption and related consequences but often ignores the social network of people with whom these heavy drinking episodes occur. The main aim of the current study was to investigate the network of social connections between drinkers on their heaviest drinking occasions. METHODS: Sociocentric network methods were used to collect information from individuals in the first-year class (N=1342) at one university. Past-month drinkers (N=972) reported on the characteristics of their heaviest drinking occasion in the past month and indicated who else among their network connections was present during this occasion. RESULTS: Average max drinking day indegree, or the total number of times a participant was nominated as being present on another students' heaviest drinking occasion, was 2.50 (SD=2.05). Network autocorrelation models indicated that max drinking day indegree (e.g., popularity on heaviest drinking occassions) and peers' number of drinks on their own maximum drinking occasions were significantly associated with participant maximum number of drinks, after controlling for demographic variables, pregaming, and global network indegree (e.g., popularity in the entire first-year class). CONCLUSION: Being present at other peers' heaviest drinking occasions is associated with greater drinking quantities on one's own heaviest drinking occasion. These findings suggest the potential for interventions that target peer influences within close social networks of drinkers.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Influencia de los Compañeros , Conducta Social , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Femenino , Amigos , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Adulto Joven
15.
Addict Behav ; 80: 47-52, 2018 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29331611

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Adolescent and young adult binge drinking is strongly associated with perceived social norms and the drinking behavior that occurs within peer networks. The extent to which an individual is influenced by the behavior of others may depend upon that individual's resistance to peer influence (RPI). METHODS: Students in their first semester of college (N=1323; 54.7% female, 57% White, 15.1% Hispanic) reported on their own binge drinking, and the perceived binge drinking of up to 10 important peers in the first-year class. Using network autocorrelation models, we investigated cross-sectional relationships between participant's binge drinking frequency and the perceived and actual binge drinking frequency of important peers. We then tested the moderating role of RPI, expecting that greater RPI would weaken the relationship between perceived and actual peer binge drinking on participant binge drinking. RESULTS: Perceived and actual peer binge drinking were statistically significant predictors of participant binge drinking frequency in the past month, after controlling for covariates. RPI significantly moderated the association between perceptions of peer binge drinking and participant's own binge drinking; this association was weaker among participants with higher RPI compared to those with lower RPI. RPI did not interact with the actual binge drinking behavior of network peers. CONCLUSIONS: RPI may function to protect individuals from the effect of their perceptions about the binge drinking of peers, but not from the effect of the actual binge drinking of peers.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Influencia de los Compañeros , Red Social , Normas Sociales , Estudiantes/psicología , Adolescente , Consumo Excesivo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
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