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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31395811

RESUMEN

This study aimed to evaluate the association between personal and job characteristics and the risk of upper limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among operating room nurses (ORNs). To this end, we collected data from 148 ORNs working at 8 Italian hospitals and measured any upper limb disabilities experienced in the previous year using the Italian version of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire. The associations between personal and job characteristics and risk of upper limb WMSDs were estimated by unconditional logistic regression models. The prevalence of upper limb WMSDs was 45.9%. Multivariate analysis showed the "female gender" and "monthly hours spent working as a scrub nurse" to be directly associated with a higher DASH score (adjusted OR for gender = 5.37, 95% CI: 1.65-17.51, p < 0.01; adjusted OR for monthly hours as scrub nurse = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.33-7.19, p < 0.01). Overall, our findings indicate that a full-time job (>120 h/month) as a scrub nurse significantly increases the risk of developing upper limb WMSDs among female ORNs. Thus, to reduce such risk in this particularly sensitive population, we recommend urgent implementation of ergonomic interventions on surgical equipment alongside job rotation and medical surveillance programs.

2.
Int J Older People Nurs ; 14(3): e12245, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31148416

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nursing students report care of the older people as an undesirable career pathway. Positive clinical placement experiences influence students' attitudes and career intentions with respect to nursing home (NH) setting. The clinical environment's quality depends on meaningful learning opportunities, the relationship with the preceptors, and the pedagogical atmosphere as influenced by the staff-student interactions. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore nursing students' perceptions on their clinical learning experience and competence learned in the NH setting as compared to other clinical areas. METHODS: A secondary analysis was performed of an Italian national cross-sectional study involving 9,607 nursing students attending 95 different three-year bachelor laureate nursing programmes in 27 universities. A questionnaire exploring individual and nursing programme variables was devised. Moreover, students self-reported the perceived quality of the clinical learning experience using the Clinical Learning Quality Evaluation Index tool and the degree of competence learned using a four-point Likert-type scale. RESULTS: Students in the NH setting scored the overall quality of the learning environment significantly higher (p = 0.046) compared to those experiencing other clinical settings, and they scored higher learning occasions (p = 0.002) and self-directed learning opportunities (p = 0.018). No difference emerged in the perceived mean degree of competences learned at the end of the clinical rotation (p = 0.271). CONCLUSION: Nursing students perceive the NH setting to be a good quality learning environment with valuable learning opportunities and self-directed learning opportunities compared to other settings. The nursing home setting provides opportunities to acquire clinical competences comparable to the ones in other clinical settings such as hospital units. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Nursing home settings should be considered by all nursing programmes as a learning environment particularly worthy for students at different levels of their education.

3.
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs ; 16(4): 299-309, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31155844

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Experimental studies are considered capable of generating substantial evidence; therefore, their production and diffusion are continuously encouraged. However, their trends as publication outputs in nursing journals have rarely been evaluated to date. AIMS: To describe experimental study design features among the highest indexed nursing journals. METHODS: A scoping review was performed by retrieving and analyzing experimental studies published between 2009 and 2016 in nursing journals with a 5-year impact factor >1.5 according to Thomson's Journal Citation Reports. RESULTS: A total of 602 studies were reviewed and 340 (56%) were included; in all, 298/340 (87.6%) were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 37/340 (10.9%) pilot studies. The publication trend exhibited a fluctuating pattern with a slight decrease over time (from 54 studies in 2009 to 32 in 2016). Researchers working in Asia and Europe have published more frequently in the selected journals. Published studies most often involved oncological (n = 69, 20%), surgical (n = 41, 12%), and elderly patients (n = 38, 11%). Educational and supportive (n = 119, 35%) interventions were mainly tested for effectiveness. Approximately half of studies enrolled <100 patients, and only two-thirds had included an a priori sample size calculation. Less than one quarter (n = 76) of the research teams were multiprofessional, and 70% of studies were funded, generally, by public institutions. LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: A broad range of research questions has been investigated to date by using experimental study designs. However, study methods and multidisciplinary collaborations must be enhanced with the intent of producing large-scale and methodologically sound studies. Furthermore, reasons for limited funding and, particularly, the lack of support from private funding should be further investigated.

4.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 18: 1534735419859095, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31220961

RESUMEN

Purpose. This study aimed to characterize breakthrough pain (BTP) and investigate its impact on quality-of-life (QoL) in terminally-ill cancer patients. Similarities and differences between high and low predictable BTP were also tested. Methods. Secondary analysis of a multicenter longitudinal observational study included 92 patients at their end-of-life. BTP was assessed with a short form of the Italian version of the Alberta Breakthrough Pain Assessment Tool. QoL was assessed with the Palliative Outcome Scale (0-40). Patients were stratified by self-reported BTP predictability into unpredictable BTP (never or rarely able to predict BTP) and predictable BTP (sometimes to always able to predict BTP). Results. In all, 665 BTP episodes were recorded (median 0.86 episodes/day). A median duration of 30 minutes and a median peak intensity score of 7 out of 10 were reported. Time to peak was <10 minutes, 10 to 30 minutes, and ≥30 minutes in 267 (41.1%), 259 (39.9%), and 30 (4.6%) of the episodes, respectively. Onset of relief occurred after a median of 30 minutes. Time to peak (P < .001) and duration (P = .046) of BTP was shorter in patients with predictable pain (n = 31), who usually were younger than those with unpredictable pain (P = .03). The mean (SD) QoL score was 14.6 (4.6). No difference in QoL between patients with predictable and unpredictable BTP was found (P = .49). Conclusions. In terminally-ill cancer patients, BTP is a severe problem with a negative impact on QoL and has different characteristics according to its predictability.

5.
Nurs Forum ; 54(3): 414-424, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31056754

RESUMEN

The behavior of clinical instructors, as observed by students, deeply influences their professional development. When instructors behave unprofessionally, they risk undermining the professional growth students gain from their clinical placement experience. Clinical instructors need to be aware of how their behavior can affect the students' learning process and the contributions they make to clinical nursing education. A qualitative study was performed to describe the nursing profession as perceived by students who observed their clinical instructors' behaviors during the clinical experience. In-depth interviews of nursing students were conducted until data saturation was attained. Sixteen interviews were analyzed using an inductive content analysis methodology. The nursing profession was described by the participants through five themes as follows: the helping relationship, technical role, professional growth, working group, and contradictions and conflicts. Several examples of unprofessional behaviors on the part of the clinical instructors were reported by the respondents. The nursing profession, as perceived by nursing students, does not always reflect their expectations and their ideas related to professionalism. Universities and schools of nursing should ascertain that clinical instructors are prepared to educate students. Faculty should clearly state to students what they can expect from the clinical experience, namely, preparing students to face real working environments that do not always reflect educational philosophies.

6.
Med Educ ; 53(10): 989-1002, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31144353

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: The hidden curriculum is a learning dimension made up of culturally acquired, unintended lessons. Although nurse educators are not fully aware of it, through the hidden curriculum students are prepared for adult professional roles, internalising professional values and developing a professional identity. However, academic nursing education has paid relatively scarce attention to it. The objective was to map the nursing education literature about the hidden curriculum and to identify and verify to which of the four areas suggested by Hafferty (institutional policies, resource allocation decisions, institutional slang and evaluation) it refers. METHODS: A scoping study was conducted. In July 2018, a search was performed in MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, EBSCO/ Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Cochrane Library databases, without time or language restrictions. Two authors independently performed the selection of studies, which followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) flowchart. Data charting was conducted with both an analytical and a narrative approach. RESULTS: The study included 18 articles, 13 of which were published during the last 5 years. A total of 12 were research articles, 10 of which used qualitative methodology. Regarding the area of analysis, all four areas could be identified within nursing education literature. The most widely explored area proved to be institutional policies, mentioned by 15 articles, predominantly to highlight the negative effect of the hidden curriculum. Some relational aspects, attributed to the hidden curriculum within nursing literature, belong to the informal curriculum. CONCLUSIONS: The hidden curriculum in nursing education remains a largely overlooked topic. It appears to be a broader concept than that theorised by Hafferty, often also encompassing the informal curriculum. Furthermore, the literature reviewed mostly highlights the negative consequences of the hidden curriculum, such as the difficulty of transmitting professional values and ethics. Conversely, future researchers should concentrate on its positive consequences as a way to limit the loss of professional values.

7.
BMJ Open ; 9(3): e025575, 2019 03 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30898820

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To explore nursing students' interprofessional educational (IPE) experiences during their most recent clinical rotation and to explore the factors supporting IPE experiences. DESIGN: National cross-sectional study on data collected in 2016. SETTING: 95 Bachelor of Nursing Sciences programmes; 27 Italian Universities. PARTICIPANTS: Students who (a) were attending or just completed their clinical rotations lasting at least 2 weeks in the same unit, and (b) willing to participate in the study. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: First to measure the occurrence of IPE experiences in the most recent clinical rotation; the secondary outcome was to discover factors associated with IPE occurrence. MEASURES: The primary outcome was measured using questions based on a 4-point Likert scale (from 0='never' to 3='always'). Explanatory variables were collected at both individual and regional levels with items included in the same questionnaire. RESULTS: 9607 out of 10 480 students took part in the study. Overall, 666 (6.9%) perceived not having had any IPE experience, while 3248 (33.8%), 3653 (38%) and 2040 (21.3%) reported having experienced IPE opportunities 'only a little', to 'some extent' or 'always', respectively. From the multilevel analysis performed using the generalised linear mixed model, factors promoting the occurrence of IPE experiences were mainly set at (a) the clinical learning environment level (high: learning environment quality, self-directed learning encouragement, learning opportunities, quality of safety and nursing care and quality of tutorial strategies); and (b) the regional level, where significant differences emerged across regions. In contrast, male gender was negatively associated with the perception of having had IPE experiences. CONCLUSIONS: A large number of nursing students experienced either 'never' or 'only a little' IPE opportunities, thus suggesting that nursing education tends to remain within the nursing profession. Limiting students' interprofessional exposure during education can prevent future collaborative approaches that have been shown to be essential in providing best patient care. In order to increase IPE exposure, it is necessary to develop strategies designed both at the singular unit and regional levels.

8.
Res Nurs Health ; 42(3): 198-204, 2019 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30912181

RESUMEN

The type of central vascular access device providers chosen for providing parenteral supportive treatments has evolved over the past years, going from routinely used centrally inserted catheters to a more recent trend of peripherally-inserted central catheters (PICCs) when expected treatment duration is less than 6 months. This multicenter retrospective study aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of the safety of PICCs in administering parenteral supportive treatments. All adult inpatients and outpatients who had a PICC inserted for the administration of parenteral supportive treatments (i.e., parenteral nutrition, intravenous fluids, blood products, or antibiotics) between September 2007 and December 2014 in four public Italian hospitals were included. The primary outcome was PICC removal because of an adverse event (AE, defined as occlusion, exit-site infection, or symptomatic thrombosis). Among the 1,250 included patients, 178 PICC-related removals because of AEs (14.2%; 1.62 AEs per 1,000 PICC days) were reported. Rates of PICC removal because of occlusion, exit-site infection, and symptomatic thrombosis were 1.08, 0.32, and 0.23 per 1,000 PICC days, respectively. The median dwell-time between PICC insertion and its removal because of an AE was 67 days (interquartile range 28-180 days). Risk of PICC removal due to AE was higher with open-system PICCs [hazard ratio = 2.75, 95% confidence interval 1.52-4.96]. In this study, we found preliminary evidence that PICCs can be safely used to administer parenteral supportive treatments lasting up to 6 months. PICCs may be a relevant alternative to centrally inserted catheters for medium-term parenteral supportive treatments.


Asunto(s)
Cateterismo Venoso Central/estadística & datos numéricos , Nutrición Parenteral Total/estadística & datos numéricos , Seguridad del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Infecciones Relacionadas con Catéteres/epidemiología , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efectos adversos , Cateterismo Periférico/estadística & datos numéricos , Enfermedad Crítica/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Italia , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Nutrición Parenteral Total/efectos adversos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Medición de Riesgo , Factores de Riesgo , Tromboembolia Venosa/etiología
9.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 33(2): 80-89, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30747776

RESUMEN

As a practice, nursing centers on patients' bodies and how they live the experience of illness and disability through their bodies (embodiment). International nursing studies conducted on the topic of body care primarily include theoretical studies, whereas empirical studies remain sparse. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' perceptions of the role of their bodies and the bodies of patients during body care. This study used a descriptive phenomenological study based on Husserl's philosophical perspective. A purposive sample of 11 Italian registered nurses representing the highest level of nursing education, different clinical experience levels, and different clinical specialties were interviewed. Data were collected between July 2015 and September 2015. Open-ended interviews were analyzed using Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method. Lincoln and Guba's strategies were used to ensure the trustworthiness of the data. In addition to the overarching theme, "Body care is the heart of nursing," 4 major themes with 13 subthemes emerged from the data. The 4 major themes were as follows: (1) "Body care encompasses the essence of person"; (2) "Body care touches the heart of person"; (3) "The body generates opposite strategies of care"; and (4) "In time, the body 'nourishes' the helping relationship." Nurses considered body and embodiment concepts central to nursing. Body care is treated as an experience with extraordinary emotional contents, allowing nurses to discover the essentials of human nature.


Asunto(s)
Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Atención de Enfermería/métodos , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Atención de Enfermería/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa
10.
Oncologist ; 24(9): e953-e959, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30755503

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are central venous catheters (CVCs) that are commonly used in onco-hematologic settings for chemotherapy administration. As there is insufficient evidence to recommend a specific CVC for chemotherapy administration, we aimed to ascertain PICC-related adverse events (AEs) and identify independent predictors of PICC removal in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Information on adult patients with cancer with a PICC inserted for chemotherapy administration between September 2007 and December 2014 was extracted from six hospital databases. The primary outcome was PICC removal due to PICC-related AEs (occlusion, infection, or symptomatic thrombosis). Independent predictors of PICC removal were identified using a multivariate Cox regression model. RESULTS: Among the 2,477 included patients, 419 PICC-related AEs (16.9%; 1.09 AEs per 1,000 PICC-days) were reported. AEs increased when PICC was inserted at the brachial site (hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.84) and with open systems (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.24-2.88) and decreased in older men (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49-0.81). CONCLUSION: Use of PICC for chemotherapy administration was associated with a low all-AEs rate. The basilic vein was the safer site, and valved systems had fewer AEs than open systems. More research is needed to explore the interaction between AEs, sex, and age. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: These findings provide clinicians with evidence that peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are safe for chemotherapy administration. They also suggest that clinicians should limit the use of open systems when long chemotherapy regimens are scheduled. Moreover, alternatives to PICCs should be considered when administering chemotherapy to young men.

11.
Nurse Educ Today ; 75: 13-21, 2019 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30669021

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Effective performance of clinical handovers should be one of the priorities of nursing education to promote efficient communication skills and ensure patient safety. However, to date, no studies have explored to what extent nursing students are involved in handovers. OBJECTIVE: To explore nursing students' handover involvement during their clinical rotations and associated factors. METHOD: This was a secondary analysis of a large national cross-sectional study that involved 9607 undergraduate nursing students in 27 universities across 95 three-year Italian baccalaureate nursing programs. The involvement in the clinical handovers was the end point (from 0, never, to 3, always). A path analysis was performed to identify variables directly and indirectly affecting students' handover involvement. RESULTS: Handover involvement was reported as 'only a little', 'to some extent', and 'always' by 1739 (18.1%), 2939 (30.6%), and 4180 (43.5%) students, respectively; only 749 (7.8%) of students reported never being involved. At the path analysis explaining the 19.1% of variance of nursing students' involvement, some variables emerged that directly increased the likelihood of being involved in handovers. These were being female (ß = 0.115, p < 0.001); having children (ß = 0.107, p = 0.011); being a 3rd-year student (ß = 0.142, p < 0.001) and being a 2nd-year student as compared to a 1st-year student (ß = 0.050, p = 0.036); and having a longer clinical rotation (ß = 0.015, p < 0.001) in units with high 'quality of the learning environment' (ß = 0.279, p < 0.001). Moreover, students who were supervised by the nurse teacher (ß = -0.279, p < 0.001), or by a nurse on a daily basis (ß = -0.253, p = 0.004), or by the staff (ß = -0.190, p < 0.001) reported being less involved in handovers as compared to those students supervised by a clinical nurse. Variables with indirect effects also emerged (model of student's supervision adopted at the unit level, and number of previous clinical rotations attended by students). Moreover, handover involvement explained 11.5% of students self-reported degree of competences learned during the clinical experience. CONCLUSIONS: Limiting students' opportunity to be involved in handover can prevent the development of communication skills and the professional socialization processes. Strategies at different levels are needed to promote handover among undergraduate nursing students.


Asunto(s)
Pase de Guardia/estadística & datos numéricos , Preceptoría/métodos , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Transversales , Bachillerato en Enfermería/métodos , Bachillerato en Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Preceptoría/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
12.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 2018 Nov 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30470575

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Less aggressive end-of-life (EOL) care has been observed when health care professionals discuss approaching EOL and preferences about life-sustaining treatments with nursing home (NH) residents or their families. We performed a comprehensive systematic review to evaluate the association between health care professionals-residents and health care professionals-family EOL conversations and EOL care outcomes. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analysis. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Seven databases were searched in December 2017 to find studies that focused on health care professionals-residents (without oncologic disease) and health care professionals-family EOL conversations and aimed to explore the impact of EOL conversations on resident's or family's EOL care outcomes. MEASURES: Random effects meta-analyses with subsequent quality sensitivity analysis and meta-regression were performed to assess the effects of EOL conversations on the decision to limit or withdraw life-sustaining treatments. A funnel plot and Eagger test were used to assess publication bias. RESULTS: 16 studies were included in the qualitative and 7 in the quantitative synthesis. Health care professionals-family EOL conversations were positively associated with the family's decision to limit or withdraw life-sustaining treatments (odds ratio = 2.23, 95% confidence interval: 1.58-3.14). The overall effect of health care professionals-family EOL conversations on the family's decision to limit or withdraw life-sustaining treatments remained stable in the quality sensitivity analysis. In the meta-regression, family members with a higher level of education were less influenced by EOL conversations with health care professionals when making decisions about limiting or withdrawing life-sustaining treatments. No publication bias was detected (P = .4483). CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: This systematic review shows that EOL conversations promote palliative care. Structured conversations aimed at exploring NH resident preferences about EOL treatment should become routine. NH administrators should offer health care professionals regular training on EOL conversations, and resident-centered care that involves residents and their families in a shared decision-making process at EOL needs to be promoted.

13.
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs ; 15(6): 480-490, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30328676

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Easy-to-access tools have been demonstrated to improve evidence-based practice (EBP) competences among nursing students. However, students' perception of access to EBP tools (e.g., clinical practice guidelines [CPGs], protocols) is unknown. AIMS: To explore: (1) nursing students' opportunity to access EBP tools during their education, and (2) associated factors. METHODS: A national cross-sectional study including all Italian nursing programs. Nursing students were deemed eligible according to the following inclusion criteria: Those who (1) were attending or just ended their practical rotation lasting at least 2 weeks at the time of the survey, and (2) expressed through written informed consent their willingness to take part in the study. Participants were asked about their perceived opportunity to access EBP tools during their most recent clinical learning experience (from 0 - not at all to 3 - always). A set of explanatory variables was collected at the individual, nursing program, and regional levels by using a questionnaire. RESULTS: Nine thousand six hundred and seven (91.6%) out of 10,480 nursing students took part in the study. Overall, 4,376 (45.6%) students perceived not at all or only a small opportunity to access EBP tools during their most recent clinical rotation. In the multilevel analysis, factors promoting access were mainly set at the clinical learning environment level (high safety and nursing care quality, high self-directed learning opportunities, high quality of the learning environment, and being supervised by a clinical nurse). In contrast, male gender and lower academic class were associated with a lower perception of accessibility to EBP tools. A consistent variability in the perceived opportunity to access EBP tools emerged across regions. LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: Evidence-based decision-making is increasingly expected from nurses. Therefore, nursing faculties should safeguard and continuously improve students' competence regarding EBP, by implementing strategies mainly at the nursing program and regional levels.

14.
Med Educ ; 52(11): 1156-1166, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30345687

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: Error reporting is considered one of the most important mediating factors for patient safety (PS). However, reporting errors can be challenging for health care students. OBJECTIVES: The aims of the study were: (i) to describe nursing students' opportunity to report errors, near misses or PS issues that emerged during their clinical learning experience; and (ii) to explore associated factors of the process of reporting itself. METHODS: A national survey was conducted on 9607 (91.7%) undergraduate nursing students. The endpoint was to have reported PS issues in the last clinical learning experience (from 0 'never' to 3 'always'). Explanatory variables were set individual, nursing programme and regional levels. RESULTS: A total of 4004 (41.7%) nursing students reported PS issues from 'never/rarely' to 'sometimes'. In the multi-level analysis, factors increasing the likelihood of reporting events affecting PS have been mainly at the nursing programme level: specifically, higher learning opportunities (odds ratio [OR] = 3.040; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.667-3.466), self-directed learning opportunities (OR = 1.491; 95% CI, 1.364-1.630), safety and nursing care quality (OR = 1.411; 95% CI, 1.250-1.594) and quality of tutorial strategies OR = 1.251; 95% CI, 1.113-1.406). By contrast, being supervised by a nurse teacher (OR = 0.523; 95% CI, 0.359-0.761) prevented the disclosure of PS issues compared with being supervised by a clinical nurse. Students attending their nursing programmes in some Italian regions showed a higher likelihood (OR from 1.346 to 2.938) of reporting PS issues compared with those undertaking their education in other regions. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students continue to be reticent to report PS issues. Given that they represent the largest generation of future health care workers, their education regarding PS should be continuously monitored and improved; moreover, strategies aimed at developing a non-blaming culture should be designed and implemented both at the clinical learning setting and regional levels.

15.
Assist Inferm Ric ; 37(3): 136-143, 2018 Jul-Sep.
Artículo en Italiano | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30303194

RESUMEN

. The missed care in Nursing Homes: a pilot study. INTRODUCTION: To date missed care have been described mostly in hospitals and data on nursing homes (NH) are missing. AIM: To describe missed care in NH residents identifying their perceived impact and seriousness. METHODS: A pilot study was conducted in 10 Piedmont NHs. For each omitted or delayed care on 20 residents observed for 3 consecutive days, the nurses provided information on the type of care, and information on the residents and on the organization were collected. RESULTS: Twenty-three nurses reported 57 missed care for 44/200 residents (22%; median 5 for each NH, range 0-13). Twenty-five missed/omitted care on 20 residents were considered of medium/high severity: 14 (56%) involved drug therapies and 5 (20%) the monitoring of vital signs. The level of severity derived from the distress caused to the resident, the risk of deterioration of residents'conditions and the repeated omissions on the same resident. Of the 32 missed care on 25 residents, judged of limited impact, the more frequent were dressing changes (12, 37.5%), and drugs administration (10, 31.3%). The most frequent reasons for delay/omission were unplanned events (16, 28.1%), shortage of nurses (12, 21.1%), and residents' clinical conditions (9, 15.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Missed care occur also in NHs. If staff shortage play a key role among potentially modifiable factors, a sizeable number of omission is associated to unlikely forseeable or avoidable events.

16.
J Infus Nurs ; 41(5): 319-325, 2018 Sep/Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30188454

RESUMEN

Since 2009, the Department of Continuing Education at the Orthopedic and Trauma Center Hospital in Turin, Italy, has provided a training course for nurses in the management of central vascular access devices (CVADs). The course focuses on dressing and flushing procedures, as well as compliance with other CVAD guidelines. An observational study was conducted among nurses to determine the level of best practices in areas with a high prevalence of nurses trained in the management of CVADs. A correlation was observed between best practices and having attended the course, but other variables also influenced best practices.

17.
Assist Inferm Ric ; 37(2): 68-75, 2018 Apr-Jun.
Artículo en Italiano | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29991826

RESUMEN

. The Emergency Department visits of Nursing Home residents: descriptive study in a Nursing Home. INTRODUCTION: Many Emergency Departments (ED) transfers of Nursing Home (NH) residents are potentially avoidable or even inappropriate since problems could be prevented or managed in the NH. AIM: To describe characteristics and outcomes of NH residents transferred to ED for respiratory, cardiovascular and neurological problems and symptoms of infection. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive study using clinical records data from 2013-2016 of a NH was conducted. RESULTS: In 4 years (2013-2016), 143 ED accesses occurred, 55 (38.6%) for medical problems in 48 residents. The residents were mainly women, with advanced age. Forty-two/55 accesses (76.4%) resulted in an hospital admission and 16 residents (38.1%) died in hospital; of the 13 discharged, 3 died the NH after a few days. The most frequent reason for hospitalization was an infection (22): respiratory (18), urinary (2) or both (2). The week before ED admission 1/3 of residents was asymptomatic, 1/3 had only one typical symptom accompained by drowsiness or agitation (7), gastrointestinal problems (5), or other non-specific symptoms. On ED admission prevalent signs and symptoms were desaturation (13), dyspnea (10) and fever (9). Six/22 residents had started an antibiotic treatment in the NH. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive management policies need to be promoted for residents with infections, based on explicit criteria to promptly monitor changes in clinical conditions and on the education educate professionals to suspect an infection even with non-specific symptoms.

18.
Nurs Ethics ; : 969733018774617, 2018 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29783904

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Undergraduate nursing students have been documented to experience ethical distress during their clinical training and felt poorly supported in discussing the ethical issues they encountered. Research aims: This study was aimed at exploring nursing students' perceived opportunity to discuss ethical issues that emerged during their clinical learning experience and associated factors. RESEARCH DESIGN: An Italian national cross-sectional study design was performed in 2015-2016. Participants were invited to answer a questionnaire composed of four sections regarding: (1) socio-demographic data, (2) previous clinical learning experiences, (3) current clinical learning experience quality and outcomes, and (4) the opportunity to discuss ethical issues with nurses in the last clinical learning experience (from 0 - 'never' to 3 - 'very much'). Participants and research context: Participants were 9607 undergraduate nursing students who were attending 95 different three-year Italian baccalaureate nursing programmes, located at 27 universities in 15 Italian regions. Ethical considerations: This study was conducted in accordance with the Human Subject Research Ethics Committee guidelines after the research protocol was approved by an ethics committee. FINDINGS: Overall, 4707 (49%) perceived to have discussed ethical issues 'much' or 'very much'; among the remaining, 3683 (38.3%) and 1217 (12.7%) students reported the perception of having discussed, respectively, 'enough' or 'never' ethical issues emerged in the clinical practice. At the multivariate logistic regression analysis explaining 38.1% of the overall variance, the factors promoting ethical discussion were mainly set at the clinical learning environment levels (i.e. increased learning opportunities, self-directed learning, safety and nursing care quality, quality of the tutorial strategies, competences learned and supervision by a clinical nurse). In contrast, being male was associated with a perception of less opportunity to discuss ethical issues. CONCLUSION: Nursing faculties should assess the clinical environment prerequisites of the settings as a context of student experience before deciding on their accreditation. Moreover, the nursing faculty and nurse managers should also enhance competence with regard to discussing ethical issues with students among clinical nurses by identifying factors that hinder this learning opportunity in daily practice.

19.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 39(7): 875-877, 2018 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29655373

RESUMEN

Midline catheters (MCs) may be useful to avoid repeated venipuncture in patients requiring prolonged intravenous infusions with limited adverse events (AEs). We analyzed 2 Italian hospital databases to ascertain the safety of MCs. Among 1,538 adult patients, 154 MC-related AEs (10%; 2.49 AEs per 1,000 MC days) were reported.Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;875-877.

20.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 45(3): 342-353, 2018 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29683116

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence, severity, and self-reported characteristics of taste alterations (TAs) induced by chemotherapy and to investigate TAs across chemotherapy regimens. SAMPLE & SETTING: 243 adult patients from five outpatient practices in Northern Italy. METHODS & VARIABLES: Correlation, univariate, and multivariate linear regression analyses. Variables include TAs, symptoms reported by patients, and the effect of TAs on quality of life. RESULTS: A majority of the study sample reported TAs. Difficulty in tasting saltiness was most common, followed by difficulty in tasting umami and sweetness. The severity and characteristics of TAs changed across chemotherapy regimens. TAs correlated with quality of life and were significantly associated with patient's age and a 21-day chemotherapy schedule. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: TAs are a frequent side effect of chemotherapy, with varying characteristics that have a negative effect on quality of life. Healthcare professionals should routinely assess for TAs and provide patients with specific management strategies depending on the nature of TAs.

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