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1.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(12): 1287-1295, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31836155

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the educational outcomes comparing flipped classroom method versus a didactic method with active learning in two semesters of a modified team-based learning (TBL) self-care pharmacotherapy course and explore student-identified preferences for teaching modality. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: Grade performance on readiness assurance processes, both individual (iRAP) and team (tRAP), and exam questions were compared in two semester-long course offerings. Additionally, students were surveyed pre- and post-course. FINDINGS: The mean iRAP scores were 81.9% for the didactic method and 80.7% for the flipped method (p = .092). The mean tRAP scores were 93.6% for both didactic and flipped methods (p = .979). Mean exam performance for content taught using didactic and flipped methods were 83.3% and 83.5%, respectively (p = .730). Pre-course respondents indicated the following preferences: didactic (27.7%), flipped (9%), combination (58.2%), no preference (5.1%). Post-course, 46.8% preferred didactic, 5.7% preferred flipped, and 47.5% preferred a combination. Respondents perceived the didactic method helped develop deeper understanding, stimulated greater interest, and improved retention; however, they felt the flipped method improved critical thinking and application. SUMMARY: There were no statistically significant differences in student outcomes comparing teaching methods while student preference for the flipped classroom decreased.

2.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(6): 541-546, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31213308

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: This study sought to quantify opinions of statewide health systems stakeholders regarding the value of partnerships with schools of pharmacy. Being better able to meet the needs of preceptors and their employers will allow schools to increase capacity of high-quality pharmacy practice experiences. METHODS: A brief survey was developed and administered to statewide contacts from systems currently partnering with member schools of the North Carolina Experiential Education Consortium. Respondents were asked to rate, using a Likert scale, 15 incentive statements relating to potential benefits provided by schools in exchange for experiential rotations. RESULTS: Forty-one responses were received from 53 invitees (77% response rate). The two most highly-valued incentives per survey respondents were continuing education (CE) accreditation by the school (74% essential), and access to school resources (74% essential). The lowest scoring incentives included system-wide committee involvement by faculty (26% essential), co-funded faculty positions (29% essential), and resident precepting by faculty (34% essential). CONCLUSIONS: Incentive ratings differed significantly from previous reports describing value, which primarily focus on clinical interventions and cost savings provided by student pharmacists. Experiential staff at schools of pharmacy should consider a similar study to ascertain how best to meet the needs of their local partners and maximize commitments for pharmacy practice experiences.

3.
Int J Pharm Pract ; 27(4): 396-398, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30912600

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes toward interprofessional, team-based care in first-year health professions students. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire was administered to all first-year health professions students in their first semester at one university using the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale (IPAS). Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the data. KEY FINDINGS: Results indicated only two significant differences among students in IPAS subdomains: teamwork (χ2  = 13.11, df = 3, P = 0.004) and patient-centredness (χ2  = 40.75, df = 3, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Not all health professions students come into their formal education with the same level of attitudes toward team-based care. Educators should consider this when designing IPE activities.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 82(3): 6247, 2018 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29692440

RESUMEN

Objective. To characterize weekly student reflections in an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) discussion course meeting concurrently with IPPE rotations in institutional pharmacy. Methods. A qualitative analysis was conducted to identify themes within weekly reflective statements submitted by second year pharmacy students (P2) enrolled in an IPPE rotation and concurrent discussion course. Weekly reflections from the 2015-2016 offering of the course were reviewed by investigators to identify common themes via an iterative process. Subsequently, investigators coded each submission into one of the identified categories. Initial agreement between investigators was assessed using the Cohen kappa coefficient. Discrepancies between coding were resolved through discussion to reach consensus. Results. A total of 402 reflection assignments were reviewed from 85 P2 students enrolled in the IPPE course. Ten themes were identified, with the most common themes being interprofessional teamwork, pharmacist and technician roles and responsibilities, and policies and procedures. Substantial initial agreement between investigators was found, with the most discrepancies arising within the themes of medication distribution and pharmacy administration/organizational structure. Conclusion. Student reflections on IPPEs centered on 10 key topics, primarily related to distributive, legal, and regulatory functions of institutional pharmacy practice. Structuring an IPPE rotation longitudinally in an academic term, with a concurrent discussion course, builds a framework for regular student reflection.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Servicios Farmacéuticos/organización & administración , Farmacéuticos/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Curriculum , Humanos , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Técnicos de Farmacia/organización & administración , Rol Profesional
5.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(4): 53, 2015 May 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26089562

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of the multiple mini-interview (MMI) within a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) admissions model. METHODS: Demographic data and academic indicators were collected for all candidates who participated in Candidates' Day (n=253), along with the score for each MMI station criteria (7 stations). A survey was administered to all candidates who completed the MMI, and another survey was administered to all interviewers to examine perceptions of the MMI. RESULTS: Analyses suggest that MMI stations assessed different attributes as designed, with Cronbach alpha for each station ranging from 0.90 to 0.95. All correlations between MMI station scores and academic indicators were negligible. No significant differences in average station scores were found based on age, gender, or race. CONCLUSION: This study provides additional support for the use of the MMI as an admissions tool in pharmacy education.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Farmacia/organización & administración , Facultades de Farmacia/organización & administración , Factores de Edad , Prueba de Admisión Académica , Educación en Farmacia , Grupos Étnicos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Criterios de Admisión Escolar , Factores Sexuales , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Adulto Joven
6.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(10): 156, 2015 Dec 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26889068

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of an early professional development series in a pharmaceutical care laboratory (PCL) course on first-year pharmacy students' perceptions of the importance of professional attitudes and action. DESIGN: Three hundred thirty-four first-year students enrolled in a PCL course participated in a new required learning activity centered on development of professional attitudes and behaviors. Students discussed situational dilemmas in pharmacy practice in small groups, highlighting application of the Oath of a Pharmacist and the Pharmacists' Code of Ethics. ASSESSMENT: Students completed an optional questionnaire at the beginning and end of the semester to assess change in their attitudes and behaviors related to professionalism in pharmacy practice. CONCLUSION: While students entered their training with a strong appreciation for professionalism, they felt more confident in applying the Oath of a Pharmacist and the Pharmacists Code of Ethics to dilemmas in practice following the new learning activity.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Ética Profesional/educación , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Enseñanza/métodos , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Códigos de Ética , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Escolaridad , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Percepción , Rol Profesional , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 77(2): 32, 2013 Mar 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23518621

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of a new prescription analysis exercise in a second-year pharmaceutical care laboratory course. DESIGN: A new prescription analysis exercise was created and implemented that shifted the focus from strictly identifying errors and omissions to identifying and correcting them. Students used electronic label templates and mock prescription materials to correct various errors and omissions commonly seen in practice. ASSESSMENT: Forty-one percent of students received full credit for the exercise using the new method compared to the previous method where 9.1% of students received full credit. Ninety-four percent of respondents preferred the new method versus the original method, with reasons given including the new method seemed more practical, applicable, and realistic. CONCLUSION: The new prescription analysis exercise addressed many inconsistencies noted with the original method. Students performed better on graded assessments using the new method and preferred it over the old method of prescription analysis.


Asunto(s)
Prescripciones de Medicamentos/normas , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Servicios Farmacéuticos/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Curriculum , Etiquetado de Medicamentos , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Errores de Medicación/prevención & control
8.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 76(4): 70, 2012 May 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22611279

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of incorporating Spanish language lectures and activities in a required Pharmaceutical Care Laboratory course on first-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students' perceptions of and comfort level with Spanish-speaking patients and basic knowledge of Spanish pharmacy terms. DESIGN: The 6-week module consisted of attendance at a 1-hour lecture on medical Spanish and Hispanic culture, and completion of 4 small-group activities: drug and product information, patient information, counseling and side effects, and a written scenario that involved filling a prescription for and counseling a Spanish-speaking patient. ASSESSMENT: All students enrolled in the Pharmaceutical Care Laboratory course in fall 2008 (153) and fall 2009 (152) completed a pre- and post-intervention questionnaire (100% response rate). Less than 4% of students considered themselves fluent in Spanish prior to participating in the Spanish language module. Students agreed or strongly agreed that it was important for pharmacists to be able to translate common pharmacy label instructions from English to Spanish (89.8%) and Spanish to English (73.8%). Student-reported confidence in their ability to pronounce common pharmacy and medical terms in Spanish significantly increased, as did their ability to correctly interpret pharmacy label instructions. CONCLUSIONS: While incorporation of a Spanish language module in a first-year Pharmaceutical Care Laboratory course did not result in students achieving fluency in Spanish, it was a beneficial method of exposing students to Spanish language and culture.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Hispanoamericanos , Lenguaje , Servicios Farmacéuticos , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Humanos , Atención al Paciente
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