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1.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-8, 2022 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35427455

RESUMEN

Objective: Among two-year college students, alcohol and marijuana use, related consequences, and risk factors for use are not well understood. We examined differences between two- and four-year students in alcohol and marijuana use, consequences, and perceived descriptive norms, and explored whether two-year status moderated associations between norms and use. Participants: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional subsample of two- and four-year students aged 18-23 (n = 517) participating in a longitudinal study on alcohol use. Results: Four-year students reported greater alcohol use and consequences than two-year students; two-year students reported greater marijuana use than four-year students. Perceived alcohol and marijuana norms were positively related with use; two-year status did not moderate these associations. Conclusions: Perceived alcohol and marijuana norms function similarly for two- and four-year students in terms of associations to actual use. Adapting normative interventions for two-year students may be an effective strategy for reducing high-risk use among this underserved population.

2.
Vaccine ; 40(12): 1888-1895, 2022 03 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35190209

RESUMEN

Among US adults, the highest rates of hesitancy to receive the COVID-19 vaccine are among young adults aged 18 to 25. Vaccine hesitancy is particularly concerning among young adults in college, where social interactions on densely populated campuses can lead to substantial community spread. Given that many colleges have opted not to mandate vaccines, identification of modifiable predictors of vaccine hesitancy - such as perceived social norms - is key to informing interventions to promote vaccine uptake. To address this need, we examined predictors of and explicit reasons for vaccine hesitancy among 989 students aged 18 to 25 recruited from four geographically diverse US universities in the spring of 2021. At the time of the survey, 57.3% had been vaccinated, 13.7% intended to be vaccinated as soon as possible, and 29.0% were vaccine hesitant. Common reasons for hesitancy were wanting to see how it affected others first (75.2%), not believing it was necessary (30.0%), and other reasons (17.4%), which were examined via content analysis and revealed prominent safety concerns. Despite these varied explicit reasons, logistic regressions revealed that, when controlling for demographics and pandemic-related experiences, perceived descriptive and injunctive social norms for vaccine uptake were each significant predictors of vaccine hesitancy (ORs = 0.35 and 0.78, respectively). When both norms were entered into the same model, only perceived descriptive norms uniquely predicted vaccine hesitancy (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.29 - 0.46). Findings suggest perceived social norms are strongly associated with vaccine-related behavior among young adult college students. Correcting normative misperceptions may be a promising approach to increase vaccine uptake and slow the spread of COVID-19 among young adults.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescente , Adulto , COVID-19/prevención & control , Vacunas contra la COVID-19 , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Normas Sociales , Estudiantes , Vacunación , Adulto Joven
3.
J Am Coll Health ; 70(3): 891-897, 2022 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32569500

RESUMEN

ObjectiveTo examine health concerns among community college (CC) students by (1) identifying and coding the self-reported health issues facing CC students and (2) examining demographic and psychosocial variables associated with health categories. Participants: 946 CC students (Mage = 26.37) recruited from January 2017 to February 2017 who completed a screening survey for a larger study. Students were asked to "List three health issues facing Community College students today." Methods: Health issues were coded into broad categories and subcategories. Results: Among the 2,601 health issues reported, one-third were medical health (36%), one-third were mental health (33%), with substance use (14%), other health (14%), and access to health care (3%) also reported. The most commonly identified health issues were "general medical issues," "stress," "depression," and "sleep." Conclusions: Programmatic efforts to support CC students and promote prevention/intervention strategies for mental health, sleep, substance use, access to health care, and general medical concerns, remain essential.

4.
Psychol Addict Behav ; 35(6): 712-722, 2021 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34591512

RESUMEN

Objective: The current study expands the literature on simultaneous alcohol and marijuana (SAM) use by focusing on the distinction between unplanned and planned SAM use to identify potential intervention targets. This study explored whether unplanned or planned SAM use was associated with differences in alcohol and/or marijuana use and consequences. Method: A community sample of young adults (aged 18-25) with recent alcohol and SAM use was recruited [N = 409; mean (SD) = 21.61 (2.17) years; 50.9% female; 48.2% non-Hispanic/Latinx White]. Participants completed five 2-week bursts of online daily surveys (2 ×/day; 81.99% of morning and 82.23% of afternoon surveys completed) and reported on substance use intentions and behavior. Results: Descriptive findings showed that among days on which participants reported SAM use, 41.85% of the days were unplanned SAM use days. Based on daily-level results from multilevel models, on days with unplanned SAM use, young adults reported consuming fewer drinks, fewer hours high from marijuana, and lower subjective intoxication/high, compared to planned SAM use days, thus indicating that planned SAM use was riskier. Unplanned SAM use was not significantly associated with positive or negative consequences related to alcohol or marijuana, after accounting for the number of drinks or hours high from marijuana. Conclusions: Current findings suggest that interventions should target days on which young adults are planning to engage in SAM use. Future work is needed to identify factors that predict planned SAM use on specific occasions and also to disentangle the potential role of unplanned heavy use. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Cannabis , Fumar Marihuana , Uso de la Marihuana , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Humanos , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
5.
Addict Behav ; 123: 107079, 2021 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34403871

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Simultaneous alcohol and marijuana use (SAM) may be linked to both short- and longer-term problems for young adults. Across two years of longitudinal data, we examined between- and monthly within-person associations of alcohol and marijuana use patterns, including SAM, with negative alcohol-related consequences, depressive symptoms, and general health. METHODS: 773 young adults (aged 18-23 at screening; 56% women) who used alcohol in the year prior to study enrollment were surveyed monthly for 24 months. Multilevel models assessed associations of alcohol and marijuana use patterns with outcomes. RESULTS: Individuals who reported a higher proportion of SAM months had more negative alcohol-related consequences (Rate Ratio [RR] = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.17,1.89). At the within-person level, participants experienced more alcohol-related consequences on months when SAM was reported compared to months of alcohol-only (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.10,1.25) and months of concurrent alcohol and marijuana use without simultaneous use (CAM; RR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.11,1.29). Compared to alcohol-only, SAM was associated with more depressive symptoms and poorer general health at the between-person level and with more depressive symptoms at the monthly within-person level; however, SAM did not differ substantially from using neither alcohol nor marijuana or CAM for these outcomes at either the between- or within-person level. CONCLUSIONS: SAM use may indicate risk for negative alcohol-related consequences, both within months of SAM use and across more extended time periods. Individuals who engage in SAM may experience worse mental and physical health than individuals who use alcohol exclusively.


Asunto(s)
Fumar Marihuana , Uso de la Marihuana , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Fumar Marihuana/epidemiología , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Salud Mental , Adulto Joven
6.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 45(7): 1458-1467, 2021 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34089527

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Understanding the nature of the association between cannabis and alcohol use within individuals over time in the era of legalized cannabis is of crucial importance for assessing the public health consequences of increasing cannabis use. An important unanswered question is whether cannabis and alcohol use substitute for one another. Specifically, is greater use of one substance associated with less use of the other substance (i.e., a negative association) or are the substances complementary and their association positive? METHODS: We used 24 consecutive months of data on a young adult sample (n = 774; 56% female, age 18-25 during the study) who drank alcohol in the year prior to enrollment. The sample was recruited in Washington State in 2015/2016 (after legalization of nonmedical cannabis) using media advertisements and community flyers and outreach. Using parallel process latent growth curve models, we assessed three types of association between cannabis and alcohol use across the 24-month period: (1) an association between average levels of cannabis and alcohol use; (2) an association between rates of change in cannabis and alcohol use; and (3) correlations between shorter-term deviations/fluctuations off of longer-term trajectories of level and change in cannabis and alcohol use. RESULTS: We found a positive association between the average frequency of cannabis and alcohol use; individuals who used cannabis more frequently on average also drank alcohol more frequently on average. Change over time in cannabis use was positively associated with change in alcohol use. There was also a contemporaneous positive association between fluctuations in cannabis and alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found no evidence of substitution. Rather, the results suggest a complementary relationship between cannabis and alcohol use, such that the use of cannabis and alcohol rises and falls together.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Uso de la Marihuana/legislación & jurisprudencia , Adolescente , Cannabis , Femenino , Humanos , Legislación de Medicamentos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Washingtón/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
7.
Subst Use Misuse ; 56(10): 1411-1420, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34126857

RESUMEN

Background: The Transitions Catalyst Model suggests increased drinking during young adulthood is due to the notion that alcohol facilitates friendships and romantic/sexual relationships during a developmental period when these relationships are highly valued. However, little research has tested the utility of this model. We examined (1) whether young adults reported greater drinking and related consequences on months when friendships were more important to them or when they were dating casually, and (2) the extent to which social drinking motives explain these associations on a given month. Methods: Data were drawn from 752 young adults (ages 18-23 at screening) living in the Seattle, WA area (56.4% female). For 24 consecutive months, surveys assessed past month alcohol use and consequences, social drinking motives, friendship importance, and dating/relationship status. Bayesian multilevel models were conducted, adjusting for time-fixed and time-varying covariates. Results: Analyses included 11,591 monthly observations. Between-persons, greater average friendship importance was associated with greater drinking. On months when participants reported greater friendship importance than their own average, they reported greater drinking and alcohol consequences. Those who reported more months of casual dating reported greater drinking and consequences on average. Relative to casual dating months, participants reported less drinking during months they were single or in a relationship and fewer consequences during months in a relationship. Associations were partially accounted for by social motives. Discussion: Findings support the Transitions Catalyst Model. Effective strategies for reducing drinking and associated risks among young adults include brief interventions focused on how social drinking motives and relationships relate to drinking decisions.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Motivación , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Teorema de Bayes , Femenino , Humanos , Relaciones Interpersonales , Masculino , Adulto Joven
8.
Addict Behav ; 120: 106967, 2021 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33971498

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Because of the role alcohol outcome expectancies play in subsequent drinking, it is important to understand factors that can shape alcohol expectancies to guide intervention efforts. This study examined among college students whether intended social contexts for drinking were associated with positive and negative alcohol expectancies at the daily-level. METHODS: Participants included in analyses were 323 students, ages 18 to 24 years, enrolled at a 4-year university in the Pacific Northwest. At four 2-week measurement bursts across one year, participants were asked each afternoon to report whether they planned to drink alcohol later that day. If so, they were further asked how much they intended to drink, whether they plan to drink alone or with others, whether they plan to drink at home or bar/party, and their positive and negative expectancies of alcohol use that evening. RESULTS: A total of 2953 person-day observations from planned drinking days were used. Results from linear mixed models, adjusted for covariates including intended number of drinks, showed that students reported greater positive alcohol expectancies on days when they intended to drink with others vs. alone and intended to drink at a bar or party vs. at home. For negative expectancies, only intended drinking with others showed a statistically significant association. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that contextual factors may shape college students' expectancies about effects of alcohol at the daily-level. Intended drinking contexts may be important to address in event-level interventions to reduce high-risk drinking in young adults.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad , Estudiantes , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Etanol , Humanos , Noroeste de Estados Unidos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
9.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 225: 108753, 2021 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34058538

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Young adults who engage in simultaneous alcohol and marijuana (SAM) use may be more likely to engage in unsafe behaviors including riding with impaired drivers and driving after alcohol and/or marijuana use. METHODS: Young adult SAM users (N = 408) self-reported their behavior for five 14-day bursts, yielding daily-level responses on a total of 14,675 substance use days. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) estimated the likelihood of riding with an impaired driver and of driving after use on SAM use days compared to alcohol- or marijuana-only use days. RESULTS: More frequent SAM users were more likely to ride with an impaired driver and to drive after use than less frequent SAM users (between-persons). On SAM use days, there were greater odds of riding with an impaired driver, compared to alcohol-only days (AOR = 1.28) and marijuana-only days (AOR = 2.22), and of driving after use, compared to marijuana-only days (AOR = 1.25). Driving after use was more likely on days with non-simultaneous alcohol and marijuana use compared to SAM use (AOR = 1.59). CONCLUSIONS: Riding with an impaired driver is common among young adult substance users, and more likely following simultaneous use of alcohol and marijuana compared to other types of alcohol and marijuana use. Driving after use is more likely after SAM use than marijuana-only use days, but most likely on days when both alcohol and marijuana were used but not simultaneously. Future research on situation-level predictors of riding and driving-related risks among young adults is warranted.


Asunto(s)
Conducción de Automóvil , Cannabis , Uso de la Marihuana , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Etanol , Humanos , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
10.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs ; 82(2): 169-177, 2021 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33823963

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Alcohol use among adults varies by season, and drinking among 4-year college students has been linked to holidays and the academic calendar. Little research has assessed calendar-related variation in marijuana use. We examined calendar month variation in alcohol and marijuana use among a sample of young adults that was diverse with respect to college status and educational attainment. METHOD: Data were drawn from a community sample of 761 individuals (57% female; ages 18-23 at enrollment). Participants were surveyed monthly for 24 consecutive months. Multilevel models accounted for nesting of monthly data within individuals. RESULTS: All measures of substance use showed evidence of variation by calendar month, with the exception of hours high in months when marijuana was used. Drinks per week and peak number of drinks were relatively elevated in summer months and in October and December; the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking was also elevated in October and December. Attending a 4-year college was associated with more drinking than not being enrolled in a 4-year college, regardless of whether a 4-year degree had been obtained. Students in a 4-year college reported more drinks per week than those not in a 4-year college in September and October, whereas the peak number of drinks converged across educational status in the summer months and in December. Across educational statuses, marijuana use was highest in April and December. CONCLUSIONS: Findings may guide the targeting and timing of substance use prevention programs by focusing efforts before and during higher risk months.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Uso de la Marihuana/epidemiología , Estudiantes , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalencia , Universidades , Adulto Joven
11.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 212: 108068, 2020 07 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32442751

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown associations between neighborhood disadvantage and alcohol misuse among adults. Less is known about the role of neighborhood context in young adults (YAs), who engage in more disordered forms of alcohol use compared to other age groups. Using data collected monthly, this study examined whether YAs reported more alcohol use and consequences when they were living in neighborhoods with greater concentration of poverty. METHOD: This study used data from 746 participants aged 18-23 years living in the Seattle, WA, region. Surveys were administered each month for 24 consecutive months. Measures included typical number of drinks per week and past month count of alcohol-related consequences. Residential addresses at each month were geocoded and linked to census-tract level percentage of households living at or below poverty threshold. Multilevel over-dispersed Poisson models were used to estimate associations between standardized monthly deviations in tract-level poverty from one's average and alcohol outcomes. RESULTS: Across 14,247 monthly observations, the mean number of typical drinks per week was 4.8 (SD = 7.4) and the mean number of alcohol consequences was 2.1 (SD = 3.5). On months when they were living in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty than their average, participants reported significantly higher levels of alcohol consequences (Count Ratio = 1.05; p = .045). CONCLUSION: YAs may engage in more problematic forms of drinking when they reside in neighborhoods with higher levels of disadvantage. During a time of frequent residential changes, YAs moving to more disadvantaged neighborhoods may benefit from additional supports.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Relaciones Interpersonales , Pobreza/psicología , Características de la Residencia , Adolescente , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/economía , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Pobreza/economía , Factores de Tiempo , Adulto Joven
12.
J Youth Adolesc ; 49(7): 1433-1446, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31983033

RESUMEN

Research examining associations between unhealthy weight and sexual risk behaviors derives primarily from cross-sectional studies conducted at varying ages during adolescence. The present study examined longitudinal associations between adolescent sexual risk behaviors and Body Mass Index (BMI), the latter measured prospectively from childhood through adolescence. Data were drawn from an 8095 individuals between the ages of 14 and 19 at last assessment, including 1768 Hispanic (52% female), 2659 non-Hispanic Black (Black; 50% female), and 3668 non-Hispanic, non-Black (predominantly White; 49% female). Childhood BMI predicted increased sexual risk-taking during adolescence for Black and White youth, and increases in BMI predicted increased sexual risk-taking for White females and Black males. The findings highlight differential patterns of association between BMI and sexual risk behaviors for Hispanic, Black, and White females and males with implications for prevention discussed.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Índice de Masa Corporal , Asunción de Riesgos , Conducta Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Peso Corporal , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Conducta Sexual/psicología , /estadística & datos numéricos
13.
J Youth Adolesc ; 49(4): 869-880, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31588973

RESUMEN

Young adults experience social role transitions across multiple life domains, and a deeper understanding of the ways in which these simultaneous transition experiences are associated with substance use and mental health will inform targeted interventions for this population. Data from the current study include24 repeated monthly assessments of young adults (N = 778; 56% female; age range 18 to 24 at baseline; 60% White, 18% Asian, 12% Multiracial, 5% Black or African American, 1% American Indian, 1% Pacific Islander, 3% Other, 9% Latinx) and outcomes 6 months later. Monthly assessments across 2 years were used to identify latent classes of frequency of social role transitions in four key domains (education, residential, employment, and romantic relationships) and associations between these classes and later outcomes. Three classes of social role transitions were identified: Infrequent Transitions (30.4%), Transitions except in Relationships (38.5%), and Frequent Transitions (31.1%). Compared to the Infrequent Transitions class, the other classes had greater typical drinking and hazardous alcohol use six months later; the Frequent Transitions class also had more hazardous cannabis use, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms. Young adults experiencing frequent transitions across multiple domains appear to be at risk for substance use and mental health problems and may benefit from targeted intervention to address substance use and mental health issues.


Asunto(s)
Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Conducta Social , Apoyo Social , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Depresión/psicología , Empleo , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Factores de Riesgo , Adulto Joven
14.
Curr Opin Psychol ; 30: 87-91, 2019 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31048248

RESUMEN

Young adulthood (ages 18-25) is a developmental period characterized by numerous transitions in social roles. This period is also associated with increased risk of substance use and negative-consequences. Changes in developmental social role status can be related to changes in substance use. In this review, we discuss key developmental transitions and social roles associated with young adult substance use, including changes in educational status, employment, intimate partner relationships, friendships, and living status. We include important differences in substance use among groups defined by race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. We conclude with implications for developmentally tailored prevention/intervention approaches targeting social role transitions associated with at-risk substance use.


Asunto(s)
Escolaridad , Empleo , Relaciones Interpersonales , Medio Social , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Adulto , Conductas de Riesgo para la Salud , Humanos , Adulto Joven
16.
Child Obes ; 14(8): 566-572, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30226993

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Most research linking weight status and timing of first sexual intercourse is cross-sectional in design, with few longitudinal analyses published to date. We examined associations between childhood weight status and subsequent onset of first sexual intercourse within a survival analytic framework, testing for differences among Hispanic, black, and white females and males. METHODS: Data were drawn from 6379 child respondents of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth aged 13 and older at last assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were estimated predicting age at first sexual intercourse from weight status during childhood without and with adjustment for correlated risk factors. Analyses were conducted separately by sex and race/ethnicity, with interactions among weight status, respondent sex, and race/ethnicity modeled in subsidiary analyses. RESULTS: Overweight status predicted earlier sexual intercourse among Hispanic females, whereas obese status predicted delayed sexual intercourse among white males, both relative to peers of the same race/ethnicity with healthy weight. Underweight status predicted delayed sexual intercourse among Hispanic males relative to peers with healthy weight. Significant differences by sex and race/ethnicity were observed in tests of interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Findings document associations between childhood weight status and subsequent onset of first sexual intercourse, especially among Hispanic females and males and white males. Together, results highlight respondent sex and race/ethnicity as potential moderators and also unique risk for Hispanic females who were overweight as children, and who may benefit from early screening and education to delay sexual initiation to reduce risk of early unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.


Asunto(s)
/estadística & datos numéricos , Peso Corporal , Conducta Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , /estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Factores de Tiempo , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
17.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 164: 172-178, 2016 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27234661

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: We examined associations between weight status during childhood and timing of first cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use in an ethnically diverse sample. METHODS: Data were drawn from child respondents of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, including 1448 Hispanic, 2126 non-Hispanic Black, and 3304 non-Hispanic, non-Black (White) respondents aged 10 years and older as of last assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression was conducted predicting age at first use from weight status (obese, overweight, and underweight relative to healthy weight) assessed at ages 7/8, separately by substance class, sex, and race/ethnicity. Tests of interactions between weight status and respondent sex and race/ethnicity were also conducted. RESULTS: Compared to healthy-weight females of the same race/ethnicity, overweight Hispanic females were at increased likelihood of alcohol and marijuana use and overweight White females were at increased likelihood of cigarette and marijuana use. Compared to healthy-weight males of the same race/ethnicity, obese White males were at decreased likelihood of cigarette and alcohol use and underweight Hispanic and Black males were at decreased likelihood of alcohol and marijuana use. Significant differences in associations by sex and race/ethnicity were observed in tests of interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlight childhood weight status as a predictor of timing of first substance use among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black and White female and male youth. Results suggest that collapsing across sex and race/ethnicity, a common practice in prior research, may obscure important within-group patterns of associations and thus may be of limited utility for informing preventive and early intervention efforts.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Comparación Transcultural , /estadística & datos numéricos , Obesidad Pediátrica/etnología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/etnología , Delgadez/etnología , /estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/etnología , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Funciones de Verosimilitud , Masculino , Fumar Marihuana/etnología , National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health , Factores de Riesgo , Fumar/etnología , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
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