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1.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 19937, 2020 11 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33203910

RESUMEN

Aging is a multifactorial process that results in progressive loss of regenerative capacity and tissue function while simultaneously favoring the development of a large array of age-related diseases. Evidence suggests that the accumulation of senescent cells in tissue promotes both normal and pathological aging. Oxic stress is a key driver of cellular senescence. Because symbiotic long-lived reef corals experience daily hyperoxic and hypoxic transitions, we hypothesized that these long-lived animals have developed specific longevity strategies in response to light. We analyzed transcriptome variation in the reef coral Stylophora pistillata during the day-night cycle and revealed a signature of the FoxO longevity pathway. We confirmed this pathway by immunofluorescence using antibodies against coral FoxO to demonstrate its nuclear translocation. Through qPCR analysis of nycthemeral variations of candidate genes under different light regimens, we found that, among genes that were specifically up- or downregulated upon exposure to light, human orthologs of two "light-up" genes (HEY1 and LONF3) exhibited anti-senescence properties in primary human fibroblasts. Therefore, these genes are interesting candidates for counteracting skin aging. We propose a large screen for other light-up genes and an investigation of the biological response of reef corals to light (e.g., metabolic switching) to elucidate these processes and identify effective interventions for promoting healthy aging in humans.

2.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 20(9): 1003-1008, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31797819

RESUMEN

AIM: The study aimed to assess the effect of friction and adhesion on the pushout bond strength of CAD/CAM fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post and cores in comparison to prefabricated fiber posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty extracted single-rooted premolars were divided into three groups (N = 10): CP: CAD/CAM FRC posts (Trilor, Bioloren) cemented with self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200, 3M) as control group. CPL: CAD/CAM FRC composite posts cemented with the same self-adhesive resin cement after lubricating the root canal with petroleum jelly (Vaseline, Unilever) to prevent adhesion. RXP: prefabricated posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Specimens were subjected to thermal cycling and then to pushout tests. The mode of failure was observed using a stereomicroscope. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc test for comparison, p = 0.05. RESULTS: Push-out bond strength was significantly lower in the RXP group (8.54 ± 3.35 MPa) in comparison to CP (12.10 ± 1.38 MPa), while no significant differences were concluded between the other groups. Failure was mostly adhesive for CPL and RXP and adhesive and mixed for CP. CONCLUSION: Custom made CAD/CAM posts have a positive effect on the retention of FRC posts to root canal walls while adhesion between self-adhesive cement and root dentin did not influence significantly the pushout bond strength of CAD/CAM posts to root canal. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The friction of well-adapted CAD/CAM fiber post and cores plays a predominant role in the success of post restorations of endodontically treated teeth.


Asunto(s)
Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Técnica de Perno Muñón , Resinas Compuestas , Diseño Asistido por Computadora , Cavidad Pulpar , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Vidrio , Ensayo de Materiales , Cementos de Resina
3.
J Prosthodont ; 28(8): 898-905, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31397947

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study is to investigate the effect of milling custom fit anatomical post and cores from fiber reinforced composite and high-density polymer blocks using CAD/CAM technology on the bond strength to root canal dentin compared with prefabricated fiber posts, and to evaluate the influence of thermal cycling on the push out bond strength of the tested materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty extracted single-rooted premolars, endodontically treated and prepared to receive the posts, were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20): BLC: Custom-milled fiber-reinforced composite posts and cores (Trilor, Bioloren), AMC: Custom-milled high-density polymer posts and cores (Ambarino, Creamed), BLP: Prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core buildups (Bioloren; Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior, 3M). The posts used have the same matrix and fiber composition as BLC, RXP: Prefabricated posts and composite core buildups (RelyX fiber post, 3M; Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior); used as a control group. All of the posts were cemented using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M). Half of the sample was randomly assigned to thermal cycling in distilled water for 6,000 cycles to simulate aging, while the other half was tested for bond strength without thermal cycling. A push-out test was conducted using a universal testing machine until failure. Bond strength values were calculated in megapascals (MPa). The mode of failure was observed using a stereo microscope. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni post hoc test for comparison. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Push-out bond strength was significantly higher (p <0.001) in the CAD/CAM post groups than in the groups with prefabricated posts regardless of the post material, while aging of the teeth did not significantly affect the push-out strength (p = 0.536). Failures were adhesive between cement and dentin for all groups except for AMC, where adhesive failure between the cement and the post was also observed. CONCLUSION: The CAD/CAM manufacturing technique was proved to ameliorate the retention of the post and cores in the root canal. Thermal cycling did not affect the bond strength of the tested groups.


Asunto(s)
Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Técnica de Perno Muñón , Resinas Compuestas , Diseño Asistido por Computadora , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Dentina , Vidrio , Ensayo de Materiales , Cementos de Resina
4.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 20(1): 56-63, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31102396

RESUMEN

AIM: To evaluate the fracture resistance and failure pattern of custom made computer-aided design & computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) post and cores using a fiber reinforced composite material (FRC) and a high-density-polymer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty extracted mandibular second premolars were selected, endodontically treated and prepared to receive the posts. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10) according to each material: group 1 (RXP) : fiber posts (Rely X, 3M-ESPE) with composite core build-up (Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior, 3M-ESPE) as a control group; group 2 (BLC): one-piece milled post and core from fiber reinforced composite blocks (Trilor, Bioloren); and group 3 (AMC): one-piece milled post and core from hybrid ceramic disks (Ambarino, Creamed). All the posts were cemented using a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200, 3M ESPE). Fracture resistance was tested using a universal testing machine, failure patterns were then observed visually and radiographically then evaluated under SEM. Data was analyzed using One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tamhane post-hoc test in order to determine significant differences among groups (α = 0.05). RESULTS: The mean fracture resistance values were: 426.08 ± 128.26 N for group 1 (R X P), 367.06 ± 72.34N for group 2 (BLC), and 620.02 ± 54.29N for group 3 (AMC). Statistical analysis revealed that group 3 (AMC) had the highest mean load to fracture in comparison to the other groups (p = 0.000). failures were cohesive in group 2 and 3 and mixed in group 1 with no catastrophic failures reported in all groups. CONCLUSION: All systems evaluated presented sufficient mean load-to-failure values for endodontically treated teeth restorations. CAD/CAM post and cores made from high-density-polymer showed a better performance than prefabricated fiber posts.


Asunto(s)
Técnica de Perno Muñón , Fracturas de los Dientes , Diente no Vital , Resinas Compuestas , Diseño Asistido por Computadora , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Humanos , Ensayo de Materiales , Proyectos Piloto
5.
Mol Cell Biol ; 35(16): 2818-30, 2015 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26055325

RESUMEN

Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX.


Asunto(s)
Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/metabolismo , Proteínas Cromosómicas no Histona/metabolismo , ADN Helicasas/genética , Glioma/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Telómero/genética , Transcripción Genética , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/análisis , Línea Celular Tumoral , Cromatina/metabolismo , Proteínas Cromosómicas no Histona/análisis , ADN Helicasas/análisis , Glioma/metabolismo , Humanos , Proteínas Nucleares/análisis , Interferencia de ARN , ARN Polimerasa II/metabolismo , ARN no Traducido/metabolismo , Telomerasa/metabolismo , Telómero/metabolismo , Telómero/ultraestructura , Homeostasis del Telómero , Proteína Nuclear Ligada al Cromosoma X
6.
J Prosthodont ; 24(6): 457-62, 2015 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25754648

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare all ceramic inlay/onlay survival rates in vital and nonvital teeth having the same cavity design. Filling the pulp chamber with ceramic materials or not was also discussed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ceramic class II inlays/onlays were made on 11 premolars and 30 molars: 14 vital, 27 endodontically treated. The same tooth preparation design was performed on vital and nonvital teeth: In nonvital teeth the pulp chambers were covered by a glass ionomer cement until the pulpal floor depths were between 2 and 2.5 mm, more likely similar to the vital teeth preparations. In vital teeth, glass ionomer was used as a liner to achieve pulpal floor depths between 2 and 2.5 mm when needed. The restorations were assessed (at baseline, 6 months, 1 and 2 years) according to three criteria: marginal discoloration, marginal integrity, and fracture of teeth/restorations, consistent with United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. RESULTS: Eight teeth (19%) showed minor marginal discolorations, while three molars (7%) had loss of marginal integrity. These margins were adjusted using rubber polishing cups and were then judged clinically acceptable. From these three molars, one was vital and two were endodontically treated. No fracture of teeth or restorations was observed. Chi square and exact probability tests were used. There was no statistical difference between vital and nonvital teeth (p = 0.719 chi-squared and Fisher) or between premolars and molars (p = 0.564 chi-squared; 1.000, Fisher). CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study there was no difference for the same inlay/onlay cavity design between vital and nonvital teeth. In nonvital teeth, it seems that filling the pulp chamber with a ceramic core material is not important. Long-term observation periods are needed to reinforce the clinical behavior outcome.


Asunto(s)
Porcelana Dental/uso terapéutico , Restauración Dental Permanente , Incrustaciones , Diente no Vital/cirugía , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Femenino , Humanos , Incrustaciones/métodos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diente no Vital/patología , Adulto Joven
7.
J Dent Biomech ; 5: 1758736014547550, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25342986

RESUMEN

When fabricating indirect post and core, internal coronal walls are tapered to remove undercuts and allow a better adaptation. To evaluate the fracture strength of anterior tooth reconstructed with post and core and crowned, with two different taper of internal coronal walls, 6° and 30° to the long axis, two groups of 30 clear plastic analogues simulating endodontically treated maxillary central incisors were prepared. The analogues crowned were subjected to a compressive load with a 1-kN cell at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min at 130° to the long axis until fracture occurred. Data were analyzed by Lillifors and Mann-Whitney tests. Mean failure loads for the groups were as follows: group I 1038.69 N (standard deviation ±243.52 N) and group II 1231.86 N (standard deviation ±368.76 N). Statistical tests showed significant difference between groups (p = 0.0010 < 0.01). Increasing the taper of internal coronal walls appears to enhance the fracture resistance of anterior maxillary teeth post and core reconstructed.

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