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1.
J Urol ; : 101097JU0000000000003962, 2024 Apr 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38593413

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Anterior urethral stricture disease (aUSD) is a complex, heterogeneous condition which is idiopathic in origin for most men. This gap in knowledge rarely affects the current management strategy for aUSD, as urethroplasty does not generally consider etiology. However, as we transition towards personalized, minimally invasive treatments for aUSD and begin to consider aUSD prevention strategies, disease pathophysiology will become increasingly important. The purpose of this study was to perform a deep phenotype of men undergoing anterior urethroplasty for aUSD. We hypothesized that unique biologic signatures and potential targets for intervention would emerge based on stricture presence/absence, stricture etiology, and the presence/absence of stricture inflammation. MATERIALS/METHODS: Men with aUSD undergoing urethroplasty were recruited from one of five participating centers. Enrollees provided urethral stricture tissue and blood/serum on the day of surgery and completed patient reported outcome measure questionnaires both pre and post-operatively. The initial study had three aims: (1) to determine pediatric and adult subacute and repeated perineal trauma (SRPT) exposures using a study-specific SRPT questionnaire (2) to determine the degree of inflammation and fibrosis in aUSD and peri-aUSD (normal urethra) tissue and (3) to determine levels of systemic inflammatory and fibrotic cytokines. Two controls groups provided serum (normal vasectomy patients) and urethral tissue (autopsy patients). Cohorts were based on the presence/absence of stricture, by presumed stricture etiology (idiopathic, traumatic/iatrogenic, lichen sclerosus [LS]), and by the presence/absence of stricture inflammation. RESULTS: Of 138 enrolled men (120 tissue/serum; 18 stricture tissue only), 78 had idiopathic strictures, 33 had trauma-related strictures, and 27 had LS-related strictures. BMI, stricture length, and stricture location significantly differed between cohorts (P < .001 for each). The highest BMIs and the longest strictures were observed in the LS cohort. SRPT exposures did not significantly differ between etiology cohorts, with > 60% of each reporting low/mild risk. Stricture inflammation significantly differed between cohorts, with mild to severe inflammation present in 27% of trauma-related strictures, 54% of idiopathic strictures, and 48% of LS strictures (P = 0.036). Stricture fibrosis did not significantly differ between cohorts (P = .7). Three serum cytokines were significantly higher in patients with strictures compared to stricture-free controls: IL-9 (P = .001), PDGF-BB (P = 0.004), and CCL5 (P = .01). No differences were observed in the levels of these cytokines based on stricture etiology. However, IL-9 levels were significantly higher in patients with inflamed strictures than in patients with strictures lacking inflammation (P = .019). Degree of stricture inflammation positively correlated with serum levels of IL-9 (Spearman's rho 0.224, P = .014). CONCLUSION: The most common aUSD etiology is idiopathic. Though convention has implicated SRPT as causative for idiopathic strictures, here we found that patients with idiopathic strictures had low SRPT rates that were similar to rates in patients with a known stricture etiology. Stricture and stricture-adjacent inflammation in idiopathic stricture were similar to LS strictures, suggesting shared pathophysiologic mechanisms. IL-9, PDGF-BB and CCL5, which were elevated patients with strictures, have been implicated in fibrotic conditions elsewhere in the body. Further work will be required to determine if this shared biologic signature represents a potential mechanism for an aUSD predisposition.

2.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38319246

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study updates the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) Organ Injury Scale (OIS) for renal trauma using evidence-based criteria for bleeding control intervention. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a multi-center retrospective study including patients with high grade renal trauma from 7 Level-1 trauma centers from 2013-2018. All eligible patients were assigned new renal trauma grades based on revised criteria. The primary outcome used to measure injury severity was intervention for renal bleeding. Secondary outcomes included intervention for urinary extravasation, units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) transfused within 24 hours, and mortality. To test the revised grading system, we performed mixed effect logistic regression adjusted for multiple baseline demographic and trauma covariates. We determined the area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) to assess accuracy of predicting bleeding interventions from the revised grading system and compared this to 2018 AAST organ injury scale. RESULTS: based on the 2018 OIS grading system, we included 549 patients with AAST Grade III-V injuries and CT scans (III: 52% (n = 284), IV: 45% (n = 249), and V: 3% (n = 16)). Among these patients, 89% experienced blunt injury (n = 491) and 12% (n = 64) underwent intervention for bleeding. After applying the revised grading criteria, 60% (n = 329) of patients were downgraded and 4% (n = 23) were upgraded; 2.8% (n = 7) downgraded from grade V to IV, and 69.5% (n = 173) downgraded from IV to III. The revised renal trauma grading system demonstrated improved predictive ability for bleeding interventions (2018 AUC = 0.805, revised AUC = 0.883; p = 0.001) and number of units of PRBCs transfused. When we removed urinary injury from the revised system, there was no difference in its predictive ability for renal hemorrhage intervention. CONCLUSIONS: A revised renal trauma grading system better delineates the need for hemostatic interventions than the current AAST OIS renal trauma grading system. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.

3.
Urology ; 186: 101-106, 2024 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38350551

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To review the management of ovarian cancer (OCa) associated hydronephrosis (HN). Specifically, we aim to identify optimal management of HN in the acute setting, predictors of HN resolution, and the role of surgery (tumor debulking/(+/-)ureterolysis/hysterectomy). MATERIALS/METHODS: The study cohort included OCa patients managed at our institution from 2004-2019 that developed OCa-associated HN. Initial HN management was recorded as none, retrograde ureteral stent (RUS) or percutaneous nephrostomy tube (PCN). Primary outcomes included (1) HN management failure, (2) HN management complications, and (3) HN resolution. Patient, cancer, and treatment predictors of outcomes were assessed using logistic regression and fine-Gray competing risk models. RESULTS: Of 2580 OCa patients, 190 (7.4%) developed HN. HN was treated in 121; 90 (74.4%) with RUS, 31 (25.6%) with PCN. Complication rates were similar between PCN and RUS (83% vs 85.1%; P = .79; all Clavian Grade I/II). Initial HN treatment failure occurred in 28 patients, predicted by renal atrophy (hazard ratios (HR) 3.27, P <.01). HN resolution occurred in only 52 (27%) patients and was predicted by lower International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (FIGO III/IV HR 0.42, P <.01) and surgical tumor debulking/ureterolysis (HR 2.83, P = .02). CONCLUSION: Resolution of HN associated with malignant obstruction from OCa is rare and is most closely associated with tumor debulking and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage. Initial endoscopic treatment modality was not significantly associated with complications or resolution, though RUS failures were slightly more common. Ureteral reconstruction at time of debulking/ureterolysis is potentially underutilized.


Asunto(s)
Hidronefrosis , Neoplasias Ováricas , Uréter , Obstrucción Ureteral , Humanos , Femenino , Obstrucción Ureteral/cirugía , Obstrucción Ureteral/complicaciones , Uréter/cirugía , Hidronefrosis/cirugía , Neoplasias Ováricas/complicaciones , Neoplasias Ováricas/cirugía , Insuficiencia del Tratamiento , Stents/efectos adversos , Estudios Retrospectivos
4.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 43(4): 893-901, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38247366

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study tested the hypothesis that ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of pelvic pain (PP) and urinary urgency (UU) would reveal unique Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (UCPPS) phenotypes that would be associated with disease specific quality of life (QOL) and illness impact metrics (IIM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A previously validated smart phone app (M-app) was provided to willing Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) participants. M-app notifications were sent 4-times daily for 14 days inquiring about PP and UU severity. A clustering algorithm that accounted for variance placed participants into PP and UU variability? clusters. Associations between clusters and QOL and IIM were then determined. RESULTS: A total of 204 participants enrolled in the M-app study (64% female). M-app compliance was high (median 63% of surveys). Cluster analysis revealed k = 3 (high, low, none) PP clusters and k = 2 (high, low) UU clusters. When adjusting for baseline pain severity, high PP variability, but not UU variability, was strongly associated with QOL and IIM; specifically worse mood, worse sleep and higher anxiety. UU and PP clusters were associated with each other (p < 0.0001), but a large percentage (33%) of patients with high PP variability had low UU variability. CONCLUSIONS: PP variability is an independent predictor of worse QOL and more severe IIM in UCPPS participants after controlling for baseline pain severity and UU. These findings suggest alternative pain indices, such as pain variability and unpredictability, may be useful adjuncts to traditional measures of worst and average pain when assessing UCPPS treatment responses.


Asunto(s)
Dolor Crónico , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Evaluación Ecológica Momentánea , Dolor Crónico/diagnóstico , Dolor Pélvico/diagnóstico , Dimensión del Dolor
5.
J Healthc Qual ; 46(1): 12-21, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38166162

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: No previous works have analyzed whether the order in which surgical teams see patients on morning rounds affects discharge efficiency at teaching hospitals. We obtained perioperative urologic surgery timing data at our academic institution from 2014 to 2019. We limited the analysis to routine postoperative day 1 discharges. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether various hospital and patient factors were associated with discharge timing. We analyzed 1,494 patients. Average discharge order time was 11:22 a.m. and hospital discharge 1:24 p.m. Univariate regression revealed earlier discharge order time for patients seen later in rounds by 4 minutes per sequential room cluster (p = .013) and by 12 minutes per cluster when excluding short-stay patients. Multivariate analysis revealed discharge order placement did not vary significantly by rounding order. However, time of hospital discharge did (p < .001), likely due to speed of discharge in the designated short-stay units. Attending physician was the most consistent predictor in variations of discharge timing, with statistical significance across all measured outcomes. Patients seen later in rounding progression received earlier discharge orders, but this relationship does not remain in multivariate modeling or translate to earlier discharge. These findings have helped guide quality improvement efforts focused on discharge efficiency.


Asunto(s)
Alta del Paciente , Urología , Humanos , Hospitales de Enseñanza , Factores de Tiempo , Eficiencia Organizacional
6.
Urology ; 184: 251-258, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38160764

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To identify genes that may play a role in urethral stricture and summarize the results of studies that have documented variations in gene expression among individuals with urethral stricture compared to healthy individuals. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in Cochrane, Ovid, Web of Science, and PubMed, limiting the results to articles published between January 1, 2000 and January 30, 2023. Only studies comparing the difference in gene expression between individuals with urethral stricture and healthy individuals utilizing molecular techniques to measure gene expression in blood, urine, or tissue samples were included in this systematic review. Gene network and pathway analyses were performed using Cytoscape software, with input data obtained from our systematic review of differentially expressed genes in urethral stricture. RESULTS: Four studies met our criteria for inclusion. The studies used molecular biology methods to quantify gene expression data from specimens. The analysis revealed gene expressions of CXCR3 and NOS2 were downregulated in urethral tissue samples, while TGFB1, UPK3A, and CTGF were upregulated in plasma, urine and urethral tissue samples, respectively, in patients with urethral stricture compared to healthy controls. The analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were associated with phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3 kinase) and transforming growth factor beta 1/suppressor of mothers against decapentaplegic (TGF-ß1/SMAD) signaling pathways. CONCLUSION: This systematic review identified gene expression variations in several candidate genes and identified underlying biological pathways associated with urethral stricture. These findings could inform further research and potentially shift treatment and prevention strategies for urethral stricture.


Asunto(s)
Estrechez Uretral , Humanos , Redes Reguladoras de Genes , Genómica , Fosfatidilinositol 3-Quinasas , Factores de Riesgo , Estrechez Uretral/etiología
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(10): e2338326, 2023 10 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37856123

RESUMEN

Importance: The Veterans Choice Program (VCP) was implemented in 2014 to help veterans gain broader access to specialized care outside of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities by providing them with purchased community care (CC). Objective: To describe the prevalence and patterns in VCP-funded purchased CC after the implementation of the VCP among veterans with prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used VHA administrative data on veterans with prostate cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2018. These veterans were regular VHA primary care users. Analyses were performed from March to July 2023. Exposures: Driving distance (in miles) from residence to nearest VHA tertiary care facility. The location (VHA or purchased CC) in which treatment decisions were made was ascertained by considering 3 factors: (1) location of the diagnostic biopsy, (2) location of most of the postdiagnostic prostate-specific antigen laboratory testing, and (3) location of most of the postdiagnostic urological care encounters. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was receipt of definitive treatment and proportion of purchased CC by treatment type (radical prostatectomy [RP], radiotherapy [RT], or active surveillance) and by distance to nearest VHA tertiary care facility. Quality was evaluated based on receipt of definitive treatment for Gleason grade group 1 prostate cancer (low risk/limited treatment benefit by guidelines). Results: The cohort included 45 029 veterans (mean [SD] age, 67.1 [6.9] years) with newly diagnosed prostate cancer; of these patients, 28 866 (64.1%) underwent definitive treatment. Overall, 56.8% of patients received definitive treatment from the purchased CC setting, representing 37.5% of all RP care and 66.7% of all RT care received during the study period. Most patients who received active surveillance management (92.5%) remained within the VHA. Receipt of definitive treatment increased over the study period (from 5830 patients in 2015 to 9304 in 2018), with increased purchased CC for patients living farthest from VHA tertiary care facilities. The likelihood of receiving definitive treatment of Gleason grade group 1 prostate cancer was higher in the purchased CC setting (adjusted relative risk ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.65-1.93). Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study found that the percentage of veterans receiving definitive treatment in VCP-funded purchased CC settings increased significantly over the study period. Increased access, however, may come at the cost of low care quality (overtreatment) for low-risk prostate cancer.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Próstata , Veteranos , Masculino , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Anciano , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Estudios de Cohortes , Neoplasias de la Próstata/epidemiología , Neoplasias de la Próstata/terapia , Próstata
8.
Transl Androl Urol ; 12(9): 1383-1389, 2023 Sep 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37814690

RESUMEN

Background: We evaluated the prevalence, distribution, and specialist to population ratio of male and female reconstruction and andrology/prosthetics faculty within United States urologic training programs. Our objective was to help determine the current need/demand for reconstructive fellowship trained faculty for necessary clinical exposure during residency in the midst of a nationwide residency expansion. Methods: All non-military urology residency programs were evaluated. Programs were sorted into their American Urologic Association Sections and websites were analyzed for evidence of fellowship training and/or clinical expertise/interest: (I) male genitourinary reconstruction (MGR); (II) female genitourinary reconstruction (FGR) and (III) infertility/andrology/men's health (AMH). The 2020 US Census data was used to determine specialist to population ratios by sections. Results: Of 137 evaluated programs, FGR had the highest percentage of fellowship-trained faculty (76%) followed by AMH (66%) and MGR (61%). Clinical/surgical interest was noted in pelvic organ prolapse (88%), inflatable penile prosthesis (79%) and urethral stricture disease (75%). Over 10% of training programs had two or more faculty with MGR, FGR and AMH fellowship training. Significant geographic variation amongst academic programs exists with the South and Southeastern parts of the US being relatively underserved, both in percentage of programs with fellowship-trained faculty, and by faculty per 1,000,000 inhabitants. Conclusions: The majority of US urology residencies have faculty with fellowship training and/or stated clinical interest in MGR, FGR and AMH. Still, many programs remain without these faculty while others have two or more in their respective fields. The geographic trends noted here have both educational and recruitment significance.

9.
Urology ; 181: 155-161, 2023 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37673405

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics, management, and functional outcomes of patients with synchronous urethral stricture disease (SUSD) utilizing a multi-institutional cohort. METHODS: Data were collected and assessed from a prospectively maintained, multi-institutional database. Patients who underwent anterior urethroplasty for urethral stricture disease (USD) were included and stratified by the presence or absence of SUSD. USD location and etiology were classified according to the Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons Length, Segment and Etiology Anterior Urethral Stricture Classification System. Anterior urethroplasty techniques were recorded for both strictures. Functional failure was compared between groups. RESULTS: One thousand nine hundred eighty-three patients were identified, of whom, 137/1983 (6.9%) had SUSD. The mean primary stricture length for patients with SUSD was 3.5 and 2.6 cm for the secondary stricture. Twelve anterior urethroplasty technique combinations were utilized in treating the 27 different combinations of SUSD. Functional failure was noted in 18/137 (13.1%) patients with SUSD vs 192/1846 (10.4%) patients with solitary USD, P = .3. SUSD was not associated with increased odds of functional failure. S classifications: S1b, P = .003, S2a, P = .001, S2b, P = .01 and S2c, P = .02 and E classifications: E3a, P = .004 and E6, P = .03, were associated with increased odds of functional failure. CONCLUSION: Repair of SUSD in a single setting does not increase the risk of functional failure compared to patients with solitary USD. Increasing S classification, S1b through S2c and E classifications E3a and E6 were associated with increased functional failure. This reinforces the importance of the Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons Length, Segment and Etiology Anterior Urethral Stricture Classification System as a necessary tool in large-scale multi-institutional analysis when assessing highly heterogenous patient populations.


Asunto(s)
Cirujanos , Estrechez Uretral , Humanos , Estrechez Uretral/etiología , Estrechez Uretral/cirugía , Constricción Patológica , Uretra/cirugía , Causalidad
10.
Urology ; 180: 256, 2023 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37652798
11.
BJU Int ; 132(6): 631-637, 2023 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37501638

RESUMEN

Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is characterised by persistent haematuria and lower urinary tract symptoms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood but thought to be related to acrolein toxicity following chemotherapy or fibrosis/vascular remodelling after radiotherapy. There is no standard of care for patients with HC, although existing strategies including fulguration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, botulinum toxin A, and other intravesical therapies have demonstrated short-term efficacy in cohort studies. Novel agents including liposomal tacrolimus are promising targets for further research. This review summarises the incidence and pathogenesis of HC as well as current evidence supporting its different management strategies.


Asunto(s)
Cistitis , Oxigenoterapia Hiperbárica , Humanos , Hemorragia/inducido químicamente , Hemorragia/terapia , Cistitis/etiología , Cistitis/terapia , Hematuria/etiología , Hematuria/terapia , Estudios de Cohortes , Oxigenoterapia Hiperbárica/efectos adversos
12.
Urology ; 180: 249-256, 2023 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37507025

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To clinically validate a previously developed adult-acquired buried penis (AABP) classification system that is based on a standardized preoperative physical examination that subtypes patients by their penile skin/escutcheon complex (P), abdominal pannus (A), and scrotal skin (S). METHODS: The Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons (TURNS) database was used to create an AABP cohort. Patients were retrospectively classified using the previously described PAS classification system. The frequency of subtypes, surgical methods utilized for AABP repair, and correlations between PAS classification and surgery subtypes were analyzed. RESULTS: The final cohort consisted of 101 patients from 10 institutions. Interrater reliability between two reviewers was excellent (κ = 0.95). The most common subtypes were P2c (contributory escutcheon+insufficient penile skin; 27%) and P2a (contributory escutcheon+sufficient penile skin; 21%) for penile subtypes, A0 (no pannus; 41%) and A1 (noncontributory pannus; 39%) for abdominal subtypes, and S0 (normal scrotal skin with preserved scrotal sulcus; 71%) for scrotal subtypes. AABP repair procedures included escutcheonectomy (n = 59, 55%), scrotoplasty (n = 51, 48%), split-thickness skin grafting (n = 50, 47%), penile skin excision (n = 47, 44%) and panniculectomy (n = 7, 7%). P, A, and S subtypes were strongly associated with specific AABP surgical techniques. CONCLUSION: The PAS classification schema adequately describes AABP heterogeneity, is reproducible among observers, and correlates well with AABP surgery types. Future work will focus on how PAS subtypes affect both surgical and patient-centered outcomes.

13.
Urology ; 179: 181-187, 2023 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37356461

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence and management of shattered kidney and to evaluate if the new description of "loss of identifiable renal anatomy" in the 2018 American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) organ injury scale (OIS) would improve the ability to predict bleeding control interventions. METHODS: We used high-grade renal trauma data from 21 Level-1 trauma centers from 2013 to 2018. Initial CT scans were reviewed to identify shattered kidneys, defined as a kidney having ≥3 parenchymal fragments displaced by blood or fluid on cross-sectional imaging. We further categorized patients with shattered kidney in two models based on loss of identifiable renal parenchymal anatomy and presence or absence of vascular contrast extravasation (VCE). Bleeding interventions were compared between the groups. RESULTS: From 861 high-grade renal trauma patients, 41 (4.8%) had shattered kidney injury. 25 (61%) underwent a bleeding control intervention including 18 (43.9%) nephrectomies and 11 (26.8%) angioembolizations. 18 (41%) had shattered kidney with "loss of identifiable parenchymal renal anatomy" per 2018 AAST OIS (model-1). 28 (68.3%) had concurrent VCE (model-2). Model-2 had a statistically significant improvement in area under the curve over model-1 in predicting bleeding interventions (0.75 vs 0.72; P = .01). CONCLUSION: Shattered kidney is associated with high rates of active bleeding, urinary extravasation, and interventions including nephrectomy. The definition of shattered kidney is vague and subjective and our definition might be simpler and more reproducible. Loss of identifiable renal anatomy per the 2018 AAST OIS did not provide better distinction for bleeding control interventions over presence of VCE.


Asunto(s)
Riñón , Heridas no Penetrantes , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Riñón/diagnóstico por imagen , Riñón/cirugía , Riñón/lesiones , Nefrectomía , Hemorragia/cirugía , Hemorragia/complicaciones , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X , Centros Traumatológicos , Heridas no Penetrantes/complicaciones , Estudios Retrospectivos , Puntaje de Gravedad del Traumatismo
14.
World J Urol ; 41(7): 1983-1989, 2023 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37356027

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To investigate management trends for American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grade V renal trauma with focus on non-operative management. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data as part of the Multi-institutional Genito-Urinary Trauma Study (MiGUTS). We included patients with grade V renal trauma according to the AAST Injury Scoring Scale 2018 update. All cases submitted by participating centers with radiology images available were independently reviewed to confirm renal trauma grade. Management was classified as expectant, conservative (minimally invasive, endoscopic or percutaneous procedures), or operative (renal-related surgery). RESULTS: Eighty patients were included, 25 of whom had complete imaging and had independent confirmation of AAST grade V renal trauma. Median age was 35 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 25-50) and 23 (92%) had blunt trauma. Ten patients (40%) were managed operatively with nephrectomy. Conservative management was used in nine patients (36%) of which six received angioembolization and three had a stent or drainage tube placed. Expectant management was followed in six (24%) patients. Transfusion requirements were progressively higher with groups requiring more aggressive treatment, and injury characteristics differed significantly across management groups in terms of hematoma size and laceration size. Vascular contrast extravasation was more likely in operatively managed patients though a statistically significant association was not found. CONCLUSION: Successful use of nonoperative management for grade V injuries is used for a substantial subset of patients. Lower transfusion requirement and less severe injury radiologic phenotype appear to be important characteristics delineating this group.


Asunto(s)
Traumatismo Múltiple , Centros Traumatológicos , Humanos , Puntaje de Gravedad del Traumatismo , Riñón/cirugía , Nefrectomía , Estudios Retrospectivos , Sistema Urogenital/lesiones , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad
15.
Urology ; 175: 208, 2023 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37257992
16.
Urology ; 175: 202-208, 2023 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36828267

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To determine if imaging with a thermal infrared camera might aid clinicians with diagnosis of equivocal necrotizing soft tissue infections of the genitalia (NSTIG) cases and help surgeons when determining appropriate surgical resection margins. MATERIALS/METHODS: For 12 months at a single tertiary academic hospital, sequential patients already undergoing exploration for acute scrotum had preoperative photography with an infrared camera (FLIR C5). We compared infrared and standard preoperative photography with operative reports and postoperative photography to investigate if infrared photography corresponded with operative findings in severe scrotal infections-specifically the viability of the skin and the ultimate surgical resection margins. RESULTS: A total of 16 patients were included. The pre-operative infrared photos directly correlated with resection margins in 13 of 16 (81%) patients. Notably, areas with a relatively lower (cooler) infrared intensity corresponded well to both visibly necrotic tissue when discrete and areas with large underlying fluid collections. Diffuse warm signal relative to surrounding skin correlated with cellulitis and viable skin. CONCLUSION: In this observational study, infrared photography corresponded well with physical exam and operative findings. There may be a role for augmented temperature photography in the diagnosis and triage of scrotal infections. More research with standardized temperature gating of infrared signal and controls with normal or nonacute scrotums are needed to elucidate the clinical utility for infrared photograph.


Asunto(s)
Escroto , Infecciones de los Tejidos Blandos , Infecciones de los Tejidos Blandos/diagnóstico , Infecciones de los Tejidos Blandos/terapia , Escroto/diagnóstico por imagen , Fotograbar/métodos , Rayos Infrarrojos
17.
Urology ; 171: 242, 2023 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36610778
18.
J Urol ; : 101097JU000000000000313801, 2023 Jan 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36715619
19.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 94(2): 344-349, 2023 02 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36121280

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI) occurs in up to 10% of pelvic fractures. There is mixed evidence supporting early endoscopic urethral realignment (EUR) over suprapubic tube (SPT) placement and delayed urethroplasty. Some studies show decreased urethral obstruction with EUR, while others show few differences. We hypothesized that EUR would reduce the rate of urethral obstruction after PFUI. METHODS: Twenty-six US medical centers contributed patients following either an EUR or SPT protocol from 2015 to 2020. If retrograde cystoscopic catheter placement failed, patients were included and underwent either EUR or SPT placement based on their institution's assigned treatment arm. Endoscopic urethral realignment involved simultaneous antegrade/retrograde cystoscopy to place a catheter across the urethral injury. The primary endpoint was development of urethral obstruction. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the relationship between PFUI management and development of urethral obstruction. RESULTS: There were 106 patients with PFUI; 69 (65%) had complete urethral disruption and failure of catheter placement with retrograde cystoscopy. Of the 69 patients, there were 37 (54%) and 32 (46%) in the EUR and SPT arms, respectively. Mean age was 37.0 years (SD, 16.3 years) years, and mean follow-up was 463 days (SD, 280 days) from injury. In the EUR arm, 36 patients (97%) developed urethral obstruction compared with 30 patients (94%) in the SPT arm ( p = 0.471). Urethroplasty was performed in 31 (87%) and 29 patients (91%) in the EUR and SPT arms, respectively ( p = 0.784). CONCLUSION: In this prospective multi-institutional study of PFUI, EUR was not associated with a lower rate of urethral obstruction or need for urethroplasty when compared with SPT placement. Given the potential risk of EUR worsening injuries, clinicians should consider SPT placement as initial treatment for PFUI when simple retrograde cystoscopy is not successful in placement of a urethral catheter. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic/Care Management; Level III.


Asunto(s)
Fracturas Óseas , Huesos Pélvicos , Enfermedades Uretrales , Obstrucción Uretral , Humanos , Adulto , Estudios Prospectivos , Cistostomía , Uretra/cirugía , Uretra/lesiones , Enfermedades Uretrales/complicaciones , Fracturas Óseas/complicaciones , Fracturas Óseas/cirugía , Huesos Pélvicos/lesiones , Obstrucción Uretral/complicaciones
20.
Urol Clin North Am ; 49(3): 479-493, 2022 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35931438

RESUMEN

In this article, the authors discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and initial work-up for men with adult-acquired buried penis syndrome (AABP). Given the significant heterogeneity of AABP, a classification system is proposed which classifies the condition by the status of the abdominal pannus, the escutcheon, the penile skin and the scrotal skin, and their respective fascial attachments. Classification is achieved by a uniform assessment of anatomy using the proposed standardized preoperative photos. Various surgical strategies to repair AABP are proposed which, importantly, should be in line with the patient-centered goals and also differ widely with the condition.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades del Pene , Procedimientos de Cirugía Plástica , Adulto , Fascia , Humanos , Masculino , Enfermedades del Pene/cirugía , Pene/cirugía , Escroto/cirugía
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