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1.
J Voice ; 2020 Jul 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32712079

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The problems faced by trans women with regard to their voice may affect their quality of life. For the evaluation of trans women's voice, tools assessing their self-perception are very important, with the Transsexual Voice Questionnaire (TVQMtF ) being one of the most frequently used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the TVQMtF (TVQMtF -TR), which was previously translated into 12 languages. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHOD: A total of 41 trans women participated in this study. The participants filled out the TVQMtF -TR, the self-perceptions of voice femininity questionnaire, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF-TR). Additionally, 58.5% of the participants filled out the TVQMtF -TR again two weeks after the first interview. RESULTS: The total Cronbach's-α value of the TVQMtF -TR was 0.972, and the item-total correlation values were found to be between 0.323 and 0.876. The intraclass correlation coefficient value was 0.931. There was a strong negative correlation between TVQMtF -TR and self-perceptions of voice femininity. There was a significant negative correlation between TVQMtF -TR and the psychological and environmental domains of WHOQOL-BREF-TR. However, there was no significant relationship found between the social and physical domains. CONCLUSION: According to the results of the study, the Turkish version of TVQMtF -TR was considered a valid and reliable tool.

2.
J Voice ; 34(2): 300.e27-300.e46, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30309771

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Normal voice can be differentiated from dysphonic voices by comparing their characteristics using an established normative database. Pediatric normative data using the Phonatory Aerodynamic System (PAS) have been established in a preliminary study for English-speaking children. However, aerodynamic measures, including physical characteristics varying by geographic region, race, and culture, must be investigated between children with different native languages. Aerodynamic analysis of connected speech requires the collection of language-specific samples and the establishment of language-specific norms. Thus, the main purpose of the present study was to establish pediatric normative data using the PAS for a large pediatric population of healthy Turkish-speaking children of 4-17.11 years of age. Another research aim was to determine age-dependent and/or gender-dependent aerodynamic parameters for this pediatric population. METHODS: In total, 120 children were divided into four age groups: Group I, 4-5.11 years; Group II, 6-9.11 years; Group III, 10-13.11 years; and Group IV, 14-17.11 years. An equal number of male and female participants were assigned to each group. The PENTAX Medical PAS Model 6600 was used. Descriptive statistics for 56 parameters across six protocols were expressed as mean, standard deviation, and range values. Each protocol was analyzed for age, gender, and age-gender interaction. RESULTS: Age was the most predominant factor, affecting 37 of the 56 aerodynamic parameters investigated. Gender and age-gender factors were observed at an equal frequency, each affecting 16 parameters. Pitch-related parameters were the most altered parameters in each protocol. Age-gender interaction was observed in parameters related to the expiratory airflow. CONCLUSIONS: This study established the normative values of phonatoary aerodynamics for a large pediatric population with a wide age range and developed a normative database for healthy Turkish-speaking children. This is the first study to investigate running speech protocol in aerodynamic assessment.

3.
J Voice ; 34(2): 304.e9-304.e15, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30529026

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Singing Voice Handicap Index-10 (SVHI-10). STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Two hundred singers consisting of a control group (n = 136) without voice complaints and a study group (n = 64) diagnosed with a voice disorder served as participants. To detect test-retest reliability, 97 participants (representing a portion of both the control and study group participants) completed the index twice with a minimum of a one-week interval between each completion. Internal consistency was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. To complete a clinical validity assessment, scores from the control group participants were compared with scores from the study group participants. To determine content validity, the correlation between the SVHI-10 and the participants' perceptions of singing voice complaints was researched. The sensitivity and specificity of the SVHI-10/Turkish version were calculated using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. RESULTS: Cronbach's alpha coefficient, which was equal to 0.91, proved to have excellent internal consistency. Item-total correlations were found in the range of 0.55 to 0.76. The mean SVHI-10/Turkish score for the control group was 8.14 ± 5.4, whereas this value was significantly higher in the study group (20.54 ± 6.9, P < 0.001). The Pearson product-moment correlation test indicated that the Turkish SVHI-10 is a reliable tool (r = 0.90, n = 97, P < 0.001). The area under curve of the Turkish SVHI-10 was 0.95. The optimal cut-off point was found to be 11.5, with a sensitivity of 95.8% and a specificity of 83.2%. CONCLUSIONS: The Turkish version of the SVHI-10 has proven to be a reliable and valid instrument for evaluating the self-perception of a singer in relation to voice problems. It can also be used as a quick screening tool because a score on the SVHI-10 higher than 11.5 is indicative of an abnormal singer's perceived voice handicap.

4.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 116: 107-113, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30554679

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Cepstral measures have mainly been evaluated by studies conducted on dysphonic and healthy adults, and many of these studies have reported the advantages of using cepstral measures for the evaluation of dysphonia however there is a paucity regarding to the cepstral analyses' results in dysphonic children. In this present study, it is hypothesized that cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and some other parameters of cepstral analysis would differ in children with vocal nodules when compared with the same parameters of cepstral analysis of healthy children. METHODS: In this present study, totally 54 children aged between 5 years old to 12 years and 7 months participated. The study group consisted of 20 males and 7 females diagnosed with vocal nodules. The control group consisted of an equal number of age- and gender-matched healthy peers. Analysis of Dysphonia in Speech and Voice software (CSL Model 4500 equipment, Kay Elemetrics Group) was used to gather speech sample recordings according to the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice/Turkish protocol. Cepstral measures of all the six CAPE-V sentences and sustained/a/sample were calculated. CPP, CPP fundamental frequency, CPP standard deviation (CPP SD), Low_high spectral ratio (L/H ratio), L/H ratio standard deviation parameters were taken into account when statistical analyses were completed. In addition to the descriptive statistics of ceptral measures for both groups, the differences between the study and control groups according to the gender were documented. RESULTS: It was found that for both genders CPP and CPP SD values were significantly higher for the control group for vowel-weighted sample, all voiced-weighted sample, glottal attack-weighted sample, nasal weighted sample, and voiceless-weighted sample. In the vowel-weighted sample, CPP and CPP SD were significantly higher for the control group in males. In females, a difference was only observed on the CPP parameter for the same sentence. In terms of the CPP value of the sustained phonation sample, a significant difference was only detected for males, whereas no difference was detected for females. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, present study found that cepstral analysis can be used to determine the difference between dysphonic and healthy voices of children and indicated that cepstral analysis should be a compulsory component of routine clinical voice evaluation of children. In addition, this present study indicates that of the cepstral analysis of sentences appear to be more sensitive to dysphonia than the analysis of vowel samples. In future studies, normative values of the CAPE-V/Turkish sentences and cutoff values for differentiating dysphonia from normal voice should be evaluated using a larger sample size.


Asunto(s)
Disfonía/diagnóstico , Medición de la Producción del Habla/métodos , Calidad de la Voz , Niño , Preescolar , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Fonación/fisiología , Habla/fisiología , Acústica del Lenguaje , Percepción del Habla , Voz
5.
J Voice ; 32(1): 51-56, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28499735

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to develop a Turkish reading passage that can be used in evaluating the frequency of hard glottal attack (HGA) and to assess its reliability. STUDY DESIGN: This is a prospective case-control study. METHODS: The Towne-Heuer reading passage is a valuable tool that can be used for the auditory-perceptual assessment of voice. The characteristics of the first four paragraphs of the reading passage were analyzed by a linguist. Then, a Turkish reading passage with similar characteristics was developed. The control group (n = 21) consisted of individuals with no voice disorder. The study group consisted of two subgroups that were diagnosed as having vocal fold nodules (n = 11) and muscle tension dysphonia (n = 10). A total of three listeners were evaluated for the frequency of HGAs. One of the listeners was a master's student, whereas the other two listeners were speech-language pathologists. Consistency between the listeners was evaluated by using the percent agreement and the kappa statistics. Intrarater reliability was assessed by the Wilcoxon sign test. The t test was used to evaluate potential differences between the groups. The results were considered as significant if the P value was <0.05. RESULTS: The average attack number in the study group was found to be significantly higher than the controls (P < 0.05). No significant difference could be discerned between the muscle tension dysphonia and vocal nodule subgroups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Findings confirmed that HGAs are clearly related to the vocal hyperfunction; however, the mechanism of action needs more research. In addition, the relationship between syllable stress and HGA should be further researched to clarify the cause of the attack number differences between English and Turkish languages.


Asunto(s)
Fonación , Lectura , Trastornos de la Voz/diagnóstico , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Humanos , Estudios Prospectivos , Turquia , Pliegues Vocales/fisiopatología , Trastornos de la Voz/fisiopatología
6.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg ; 45(6): 891-896, 2017 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28381372

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the speech results of posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation (PPWA) with fat grafting both in the early and late postoperative period, and to clarify the impact of the procedure concomitant with speech therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective case-control study. The study involved 87 cleft palate ± cleft lip patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) who has been treated with PPWA. Patients were separated into two groups according to age; the first group consisted of 49 pediatric participants between 6 and 12 years of age and the second group consisted of 38 adolescent participants between 13 and 18 years of age. Preoperative velopharyngeal function and articulation were compared postoperatively at the following time points: the 3rd month, 12th month, 18th month and 24th month. The velopharyngeal function was evaluated with regards to the velopharyngeal closure type and velopharyngeal closure amount, by using the pediatric flexible nasoendoscopy and the nasometer methods. In the nasometer evaluation, nasalance sores were measured by using nonsense syllables and meaningful sentences. The Ankara Articulation Test (AAT) (Ege et al., 2004) was used to detect compensatory articulation products secondary to VPI. Consonant production error types and frequencies were determined according the guidelines stated in the study of Hardin-Jones et al. (2009). These were Pharyngeal Fricatives - Posterior Nasal Fricatives/Stop Production, Glottal Stop Production, Middorsum Palatal Stop Production, Nasal Frictional Production, Posterior Nasal Frictional Production/Phoneme Specific Nasal Emission, use of Nasal Consonants for Oral Consonants, and Replacement of Trills. All the participants received concurrent speech therapy four times, twice in the post-operative period between 1 and 3 months and twice between 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: PPWA improved the speech performance from the 18th month to 24th month of the postoperative period. AAT assessment of the first group after 24 months comparing the post-PPWA with the preoperative data showed a highly significant decrease with regard to compensatory production errors and hypernasality; however, in the second group, the same comparison revealed a highly significant decrease in regard to the degree of hypernasality and a significant difference in terms of glottal articulation and pharyngealization of fricatives. A circular closure pattern was observed in 17 individuals with cleft palate at a rate of 70.6%. CONCLUSION: PPWA with concurrent speech therapy is an acceptable surgical method to correct VPI and to improve speech performance.


Asunto(s)
Tejido Adiposo/trasplante , Trastornos de la Articulación/rehabilitación , Fisura del Paladar/cirugía , Faringe/cirugía , Insuficiencia Velofaríngea/cirugía , Adolescente , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
7.
Eur J Orthod ; 39(4): 440-445, 2017 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27507127

RESUMEN

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two retainer types (Essix and Hawley) on speech performance. Subjects and methods: The speech articulation of 30 patients was evaluated prospectively. Five patients did not appear during the follow-up periods. The patients were randomly divided into retention groups by treatment allocation cards as Essix and Hawley. The Essix group included 13 participants with a mean age of 15.3±2.4 years; the Hawley group included 12 participants with a mean age of 16.3±2.56 years. Speech sound assessments were performed on the first day and 1 week, 4 weeks, and 3 months later. On the first day, the assessments were conducted prior to inserting the retainers, immediately after maxillary and mandibular retainer application, individually, and with both retainers applied. The acoustic analyses were obtained using spectral and temporal parameters. Results: Statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS for Windows, version 20. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The most apparent changes were found in the [a] vowel in the Hawley group, the [e] vowel in the Essix group, and the [u] vowel in both groups (P < 0.05). While the number of affected consonant-vowel couples in the Essix group was low, alterations were common in the Hawley group. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in voice onset time of the [d] sound between the groups. Limitations: The trial had a small sample size and a short follow-up period. Conclusions: The Hawley retainer affected articulatory movements in consonant-vowel combinations more prominently than the Essix retainer did. Voice onset time of the consonant [d] in the Hawley group was shorter than normal, indicating rapid articulatory movement in the alveolar region.


Asunto(s)
Retenedores Ortodóncicos/efectos adversos , Acústica del Lenguaje , Trastornos del Habla/etiología , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Mandíbula , Maxilar , Movimiento/fisiología , Diseño de Aparato Ortodóncico , Procesamiento de Señales Asistido por Computador , Habla/fisiología , Pruebas de Articulación del Habla , Trastornos del Habla/diagnóstico
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