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2.
Hepatol Commun ; 3(6): 847, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31168518

RESUMEN

The national burden of chronic liver disease is steadily increasing and is only expected to worsen with the ongoing obesity and opioid epidemics fueling growth in the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and a resurgence of new hepatitis C infections. Our letter highlights the disparity between the rising prevalence of chronic liver disease and the proportion of medical students who receive exposure to patients with liver disease as part of their medical education. A more comprehensive survey of clerkship directors is needed to further corroborate this data, which may lead to reforms in medical school curricula to better address the expanding burden of chronic liver disease.

3.
J Clin Pharm Ther ; 44(4): 579-587, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31152684

RESUMEN

WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: The use of generic oral contraceptives (OCPs) can improve adherence and reduce healthcare costs, yet scepticism of generic drugs remains a barrier to generic OCP discussion and prescription. An educational web module was developed to reduce generic scepticism related to OCPs, improve knowledge of generic drugs and increase physician willingness to discuss and prescribe generic OCPs. METHODS: A needs assessment was completed using in-person focus groups at American College of Physicians (ACP) Annual Meeting and a survey targeting baseline generic scepticism. Insights gained were used to build an educational web module detailing barriers and benefits of generic OCP prescription. The module was disseminated via email to an ACP research panel who completed our baseline survey. Post-module evaluation measured learner reaction, knowledge and intention to change behaviour along with generic scepticism. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The module had a response rate of 56% (n = 208/369). Individuals defined as generic sceptics at baseline were significantly less likely to complete our module compared to non-sceptics (responders 9.6% vs non-responders 16.8%, P = 0.04). The majority (85%, n = 17/20) of baseline sceptics were converted to non-sceptics (P < 0.01) following completion of the module. Compared to non-sceptics, post-module generic sceptics reported less willingness to discuss (sceptic 33.3% vs non-sceptic 71.5%, P < 0.01), but not less willingness to prescribe generic OCPs (sceptic 53.3% vs non-sceptic 67.9%, P = 0.25). Non-white physicians and international medical graduates (IMG) were more likely to be generic sceptics at baseline (non-white 86.9% vs white 69.9%, P = 0.01, IMG 13.0% vs USMG 5.0% vs unknown 18.2%, P = 0.03) but were also more likely to report intention to prescribe generic OCPs as a result of the module (non-white 78.7% vs white 57.3%, P < 0.01, IMG 76.1% vs USMG 50.3% vs unknown 77.3%, P = 0.03). WHAT IS NEW AND CONCLUSION: A brief educational web module can be used to promote prescribing of generic OCPs and reduce generic scepticism.

5.
J Hosp Med ; 14(1): 38-41, 2019 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30667409

RESUMEN

We created Sleep for Inpatients: Empowering Staff to Act (SIESTA), which combines electronic "nudges" to forgo nocturnal vitals and medications with interprofessional education on improving patient sleep. In one "SIESTAenhanced unit," nurses received coaching and integrated SIESTA into daily huddles; a standard unit did not. Six months pre- and post-SIESTA, sleep-friendly orders rose in both units (foregoing vital signs: SIESTA unit, 4% to 34%; standard, 3% to 22%, P < .001 both; sleeppromoting VTE prophylaxis: SIESTA, 15% to 42%; standard, 12% to 28%, P < .001 both). In the SIESTAenhanced unit, nighttime room entries dropped by 44% (-6.3 disruptions/room, P < .001), and patients were more likely to report no disruptions for nighttime vital signs (70% vs 41%, P = .05) or medications (84% vs 57%, P = .031) than those in the standard unit. The standard unit was not changed. Although sleep-friendly orders were adopted in both units, a unit-based nursing empowerment approach was associated with fewer nighttime room entries and improved patient experience.

6.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 28(8): 627-634, 2019 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30636201

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There is limited literature about physician handoffs between the intensive care unit (ICU) and the ward, and best practices have not been described. These patients are uniquely vulnerable given their medical complexity, diagnostic uncertainty and reduced monitoring intensity. We aimed to characterise the structure, perceptions and processes of ICU-ward handoffs across three teaching hospitals using multimodal methods: by identifying the handoff components involved in communication failures and describing common processes of patient transfer. METHODS: We conducted a study at three academic medical centres using two methods to characterise the structure, perceptions and processes of ICU-ward transfers: (1) an anonymous resident survey characterising handoff communication during ICU-ward transfer, and (2) comparison of process maps to identify similarities and differences between ICU-ward transfer processes across the three hospitals. RESULTS: Of the 295 internal medicine residents approached, 175 (59%) completed the survey. 87% of the respondents recalled at least one adverse event related to communication failure during ICU-ward transfer. 95% agreed that a well-structured handoff template would improve ICU-ward transfer. Rehabilitation needs, intravenous access/hardware and risk assessments for readmission to the ICU were the most frequently omitted or incorrectly communicated components of handoff notes. More than 60% of the respondents reported that notes omitted or miscommunicated pending results, active subspecialty consultants, nutrition and intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and healthcare decision-maker information at least twice per month. Despite variable process across the three sites, all process maps demonstrated flaws and potential for harm in critical steps of the ICU-ward transition. CONCLUSION: In this multisite study, despite significant process variation across sites, almost all resident physicians recalled an adverse event related to the ICU-ward handoff. Future work is needed to determine best practices for ICU-ward handoffs at academic medical centres.

8.
Acad Med ; 94(1): 129-134, 2019 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30157090

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To assess current approaches to teaching the physical exam to preclerkship students at U.S. medical schools. METHOD: The Directors of Clinical Skills Courses developed a 49-question survey addressing the approach, pedagogical methods, and assessment methods of preclerkship physical exam curricula. The survey was administered to all 141 Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited U.S. medical schools in October 2015. Results were aggregated across schools, and survey weights were used to adjust for response rate and school size. RESULTS: One hundred six medical schools (75%) responded. Seventy-nine percent of schools (84) began teaching the physical exam within the first two months of medical school. Fifty-six percent of schools (59) employed both a "head-to-toe" comprehensive approach and a clinical reasoning approach. Twenty-three percent (24) taught a portion of the physical exam interprofessionally. Videos, online modules, and simulators were used widely, and 39% of schools (41) used bedside ultrasonography. Schools reported a median of 4 formative assessments and 3 summative assessments, with 16% of schools (17) using criterion-based standard-setting methods for physical exam assessments. Results did not vary significantly by school size. CONCLUSIONS: There was wide variation in how medical schools taught the physical exam to preclerkship students. Common pedagogical approaches included early initiation of physical exam instruction, use of technology, and methods that support clinical reasoning and competency-based medical education. Approaches used by a minority of schools included interprofessional education, ultrasound, and criterion-based standard-setting methods for assessments. Opportunities abound for research into the optimal methods for teaching the physical exam.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas/métodos , Competencia Clínica , Educación Basada en Competencias/organización & administración , Curriculum , Educación Médica/organización & administración , Examen Físico/métodos , Enseñanza , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Facultades de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
9.
JMIR Med Educ ; 4(2): e18, 2018 Aug 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30131315

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) has created a core subinternship curriculum, the traditional experiential subinternship may not expose students to all topics. Furthermore, academic institutions often use multiple clinical training sites for the student clerkship experience. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to sustain a Web-based learning community across geographically disparate sites via enterprise microblogging to increase subintern exposure to the CDIM curriculum. METHODS: Internal medicine subinterns used Yammer, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-secure enterprise microblogging platform, to post questions, images, and index conversations for searching. The subinterns were asked to submit 4 posts and participate in 4 discussions during their rotation. Faculty reinforced key points, answered questions, and monitored HIPAA compliance. RESULTS: In total, 56 medical students rotated on an internal medicine subinternship from July 2014 to June 2016. Of them, 84% returned the postrotation survey. Over the first 3 months, 100% of CDIM curriculum topics were covered. Compared with the pilot year, the scale-up year demonstrated a significant increase in the number of students with >10 posts (scale-up year 49% vs pilot year 19%; P=.03) and perceived educational experience (58% scale-up year vs 14% pilot year; P=.006). Few students (6%) noted privacy concerns, but fewer students in the scale-up year found Yammer to be a safe learning environment. CONCLUSIONS: Supplementing the subinternship clinical experience with an enterprise microblogging platform increased subinternship exposure to required curricular topics and was well received. Future work should address concerns about safe learning environment.

10.
Acad Med ; 93(12): 1814-1820, 2018 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29923893

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: Formal education in requesting consultations is inconsistent in medical education. To address this gap, the authors developed the Consultation Observed Simulated Clinical Experience (COSCE), a simulation-based curriculum for interns using Kessler and colleagues' 5Cs of Consultation model to teach and assess consultation communication skills. APPROACH: In June 2016, 127 interns entering 12 University of Chicago Medicine residency programs participated in the COSCE pilot. The COSCE featured an online training module on the 5Cs and an in-person simulated consultation. Using specialty-specific patient cases, interns requested telephone consultations from faculty, who evaluated their performance using validated checklists. Interns were surveyed on their preparedness to request consultations before and after the module and after the simulation. Subspecialty fellows serving as consultants were surveyed regarding consultation quality before and after the COSCE. OUTCOMES: After completing the online module, 84% of interns (103/122) were prepared to request consultations compared with 52% (63/122) at baseline (P < .01). After the COSCE, 96% (122/127) were prepared to request consultations (P < .01). Neither preparedness nor simulation performance differed by prior experience or training. Over 90% (115/127) indicated they would recommend the COSCE for future interns. More consultants described residents as prepared to request consultations after the COSCE (54%; 21/39) than before (27%; 11/41, P = .01). NEXT STEPS: The COSCE was well received and effective for preparing entering interns with varying experience and training to request consultations. Future work will emphasize consultation communication specific to training environments and evaluate skills via direct observation of clinical performance.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Adulto , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Retroalimentación , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Derivación y Consulta
11.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys ; 101(5): 1039-1045, 2018 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29908787

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: A structured didactic radiation oncology clerkship curriculum for medical students is in use at multiple academic medical centers. Objective evidence supporting this educational approach over the traditional clerkship model is lacking. This study evaluated the curriculum efficacy using an objective knowledge assessment. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Medical students received the Radiation Oncology Education Collaborative Study Group (ROECSG) curriculum consisting of 3 lectures (Overview of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology/Physics, and Practical Aspects of Simulation/Radiation Emergencies) and a radiation oncology treatment-planning workshop. A standardized 20-item multiple choice question (MCQ) knowledge assessment was completed pre- and post-curriculum and approximately 6 months after receiving the curriculum. RESULTS: One hundred forty-six students at 22 academic medical centers completed the ROECSG curriculum from July to November 2016. One hundred nine students completed pre- and post-clerkship MCQ knowledge assessments (response rate 74.7%). Twenty-four students reported a prior rotation at a ROECSG institution and were excluded from analysis. Mean assessment scores increased from pre- to post-curriculum (63.9% vs 80.2%, P < .01). Mean MCQ knowledge subdomain assessment scores all improved post-curriculum (t test, P values < .01). Post-scores for students rotating de novo at ROECSG institutions (n = 30) were higher compared with pre-scores for students with ≥1 prior rotations at non-ROECSG institutions (n = 55) (77.3% vs 68.8%, P = .01), with an effect size of 0.8. Students who completed rotations at ROECSG institutions continued to demonstrate a trend toward improved performance on the objective knowledge assessment at approximately 6 months after curriculum exposure (70.5% vs 65.6%, P = .11). CONCLUSIONS: Objective evaluation of a structured didactic curriculum for the radiation oncology clerkship at early and late time points demonstrated significant improvement in radiation oncology knowledge. Students who completed clerkships at ROECSG institutions performed objectively better than students who completed clerkships at non-ROECSG institutions. These results support including a structured didactic curriculum as a standard component of the radiation oncology clerkship.


Asunto(s)
Centros Médicos Académicos , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Oncología por Radiación/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina , Chicago , Prácticas Clínicas , Recolección de Datos , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Planificación de la Radioterapia Asistida por Computador , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades
12.
Simul Healthc ; 13(4): 233-238, 2018 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29727347

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Despite the increasing use of training simulations to teach and assess resident handoffs, simulations that approximate realistic hospital conditions with distractions are lacking. This study explores the effects of a novel simulation-based training intervention on resident handoff performance in the face of prevalent hospital interruptions. METHODS: After a preliminary educational module, entering postgraduate year 1 residents (interns) completed one of the following three handoff simulations: (1) no interruption, (2) hospital noise, or (3) noise and pager interruptions. Trained receivers rated interns using an evidence-based Handoff Behaviors Checklist and a previously validated Handoff Mini-Clinical Examination Exercise instrument. RESULTS: Of 127 eligible interns, 125 (98.4%) completed an online preparatory module and a handoff simulation. Interns receiving auditory interruptions were less likely to be heard adequately (48.8% noise and 71.8% noise + pager vs. 100.0% uninterrupted, P < 0.001) and scored lower on establishing appropriate handoff settings (5.7 ± 2.3 noise and 6.2 ± 1.8 noise + pager vs. 8.0 ± 0.8 uninterrupted, P < 0.001). Interns receiving noise only shared a written sign-out document more effectively (71.1% vs. 30.2% uninterrupted and 43.6% noise + pager, P < 0.001). There were no differences in averaged performance metrics on the Handoff Behaviors Checklist. DISCUSSION: While common hospital interruptions created nonideal circumstances for the handoff, interns receiving interruptions were rated similarly and recovered effectively. However, interns exposed to noise only used the written sign-out form more actively. Our findings suggest that this intervention was successful in promoting handoff proficiency despite exposure to common but significant hospital interruptions.


Asunto(s)
Lista de Verificación/normas , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Ruido/efectos adversos , Pase de Guardia/normas , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Competencia Clínica , Femenino , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/normas , Masculino
13.
Acad Med ; 93(5): 736-741, 2018 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29116985

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To examine resources used in teaching the physical exam to preclerkship students at U.S. medical schools. METHOD: The Directors of Clinical Skills Courses developed a 49-question survey addressing resources and pedagogical methods employed in preclerkship physical exam curricula. The survey was sent to all 141 Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited medical schools in October 2015. Results were averaged across schools, and data were weighted by class size. RESULTS: Results from 106 medical schools (75% response rate) identified a median of 59 hours devoted to teaching the physical exam. Thirty-eight percent of time spent teaching the physical exam involved the use of standardized patients, 30% used peer-to-peer practice, and 25% involved examining actual patients. Approximately half of practice time with actual patients was observed by faculty. At 48% of schools (51), less than 15% of practice time was with actual patients, and at 20% of schools (21) faculty never observed students practicing with actual patients. Forty-eight percent of schools (51) did not provide compensation for their outpatient clinical preceptors. CONCLUSIONS: There is wide variation in the resources used to teach the physical examination to preclerkship medical students. At some schools, the amount of faculty observation of students examining actual patients may not be enough for students to achieve competency. A significant percentage of faculty teaching the physical exam remain uncompensated for their effort. Improving faculty compensation and increasing use of senior students as teachers might allow for greater observation and feedback and improved physical exam skills among students.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas/métodos , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Examen Físico/métodos , Facultades de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Enseñanza/estadística & datos numéricos , Curriculum , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
14.
Patient Educ Couns ; 101(3): 481-489, 2018 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29042145

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Electronic Health Record (EHR) use can enhance or weaken patient-provider communication. Despite EHR adoption, no validated tool exists to assess EHR communication skills. We aimed to develop and validate such a tool. METHODS: Electronic-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (e-CEX) is a 10-item-tool based on systematic literature review and pilot-testing. Second-year (MS2s) students participated in an EHR-use lecture and structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Untrained third-year students (MS3s) participated in the same OSCE. OSCEs were scored with e-CEX compared to a standardized patient (SP) tool. Internal consistency, discriminant validity, and concurrent validity were analyzed. RESULTS: Three investigators used e-CEX to rate 70 videos (20 MS2, 50 MS3). Reliability testing indicated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.89). MS2s scored significantly higher than untrained MS3s on e-CEX [e-CEX 55(10.7) vs. 44.9 (12.7), P=0.003], providing evidence of discriminant validity. e-CEX and SP score correlation was high (Pearson correlation=0.74, P<0.001), providing concurrent validity evidence. Item reduction suggested a three-item tool had similar explanatory power (R-squared=0.85 vs 0.86). CONCLUSION: e-CEX is a reliable, valid tool to assess medical student patient-centered EHR communication skills. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: While validation is needed with other healthcare providers, e-CEX may help improve provider behaviors and enhance patients' overall experience of EHR use in their care.


Asunto(s)
Registros Electrónicos de Salud , Registros de Salud Personal , Atención Dirigida al Paciente/métodos , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Evaluación Educacional , Femenino , Humanos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
15.
Acad Med ; 93(5): 693-698, 2018 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28834843

RESUMEN

Recently, a student-initiated movement to end the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Skills and the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation has gained momentum. These are the only national licensing examinations designed to assess clinical skills competence in the stepwise process through which physicians gain licensure and certification. Therefore, the movement to end these examinations and the ensuing debate merit careful consideration. The authors, elected representatives of the Directors of Clinical Skills Courses, an organization comprising clinical skills educators in the United States and beyond, believe abolishing the national clinical skills examinations would have a major negative impact on the clinical skills training of medical students, and that forfeiting a national clinical skills competency standard has the potential to diminish the quality of care provided to patients. In this Perspective, the authors offer important additional background information, outline key concerns regarding the consequences of ending these national clinical skills examinations, and provide recommendations for moving forward: reducing the costs for students, exploring alternatives, increasing the value and transparency of the current examinations, recognizing and enhancing the strengths of the current examinations, and engaging in a national dialogue about the issue.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Licencia Médica/normas , Ejecutivos Médicos/psicología , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Estados Unidos
16.
Acad Med ; 93(2): 214-219, 2018 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28678096

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: Residency clinician-educator tracks have been created; however, they have generally been limited to a single discipline or program and experienced some challenges. The Graduate Medical Education Scholars Track (GMEST), an embedded longitudinal, multimodal, multidisciplinary clinician-educator track for residents, was piloted at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, in academic year 2014-2015. APPROACH: The GMEST is a two-year experience completed during residency training. The goal is to prepare trainees for academic careers as clinician-educators with a focus on medical education scholarship. This track is designed for residents from diverse training programs with variable clinical schedules and blends a live interactive program, asynchronous instruction and discussion, and overarching multimodal mentorship in medical education. Participants are expected to complete a capstone medical education project and submit it to institutional, regional, and/or national venues. OUTCOMES: Data gathered from the 2014-2016 and 2015-2017 cohorts demonstrated that 21/22 (95%) participants were satisfied with the GMEST curriculum, felt it was important to their development as future clinician-educators, and felt it would positively influence their ability to work in medical education. Further, 18/22 (82%) participants wished to pursue a career as a clinician-educator and in medical education leadership and/or scholarship. NEXT STEPS: The authors will longitudinally track graduates' future career positions, projects, publications, and awards, and cross-match and compare GMEST graduates with non-GMEST residents interested in medical education. Faculty mentors, program directors, and the Medical Education, Research, Innovation, Teaching, and Scholarship community will be asked for feedback on the GMEST.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Docentes Médicos/educación , Internado y Residencia , Anestesiología/educación , Medicina de Emergencia/educación , Cirugía General/educación , Humanos , Estudios Interdisciplinarios , Medicina Interna/educación , Liderazgo , Pediatría/educación , Desarrollo de Programa
17.
J Grad Med Educ ; 9(6): 706-713, 2017 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29270258

RESUMEN

Background : Advances in information technology have increased remote access to the electronic health record (EHR). Concurrently, standards defining appropriate resident supervision have evolved. How often and under what circumstances inpatient attending physicians remotely access the EHR for resident supervision is unknown. Objective : We described a model of attending remote EHR use for resident supervision, and quantified the frequency and magnitude of use. Methods : Using a mixed methods approach, general medicine inpatient attendings were surveyed and interviewed about their remote EHR use. Frequency of use and supervisory actions were quantitatively examined via survey. Transcripts from semistructured interviews were analyzed using grounded theory to identify codes and themes. Results : A total of 83% (59 of 71) of attendings participated. Fifty-seven (97%) reported using the EHR remotely, with 54 (92%) reporting they discovered new clinical information not relayed by residents via remote EHR use. A majority (93%, 55 of 59) reported that this resulted in management changes, and 54% (32 of 59) reported making immediate changes by contacting cross-covering teams. Six major factors around remote EHR use emerged: resident, clinical, educational, personal, technical, and administrative. Attendings described resident and clinical factors as facilitating "backstage" supervision via remote EHR use. Conclusions : In our study to assess attending remote EHR use for resident supervision, attendings reported frequent remote use with resulting supervisory actions, describing a previously uncharacterized form of "backstage" oversight supervision. Future work should explore best practices in remote EHR use to provide effective supervision and ultimately improve patient safety.


Asunto(s)
Acceso a la Información , Registros Electrónicos de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Medicina Interna/educación , Internado y Residencia , Cuerpo Médico de Hospitales , Modelos Educacionales , Adulto , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Femenino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
18.
Med Educ Online ; 22(1): 1396171, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29103366

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Integrating electronic health records (EHRs) into clinical care can prevent physicians from focusing on patients. Despite rapid EHR adoption, few curricula teach communication skills and best practices for patient-centered EHR use. OBJECTIVE: We piloted a 'Patient-centered EHR use' curriculum, consisting of a lecture and group-observed structured clinical examination (GOSCE) for second-year students (MS2s). DESIGN: During the lecture, students watched a trigger tape video, engaged in a reflective observation exercise, and learned best practices. During the GOSCE, one of four MS2s interacted with a standardized patient (SP) while using the EHR. Third-year students (MS3s) received no formal training and served as a historical control group by completing the same OSCE individually. All students completed post-GOSCE/OSCE surveys. The SP evaluated GOSCE/OSCE performance. RESULTS: In 2013, 89 MS2s participated in the workshop and GOSCEs during their required Clinical Skills course and 96 MS3s participated in individual OSCEs during their end of year multi-station formative GOSCE exercise. Eighty MS2s (90%) and 88 MS3s (92%) post-GOSCE/OSCE surveys were analyzed. Compared to MS3s, significantly more MS2s rated their knowledge (19% vs 55%) and training (14% vs 39%) as good (≥4/5 point scale, P < .001 for both). Most learners (85% MS2s and 70% MS3s) thought training should be required for all students. SP ratings on GOSCE/OSCE performance was higher for the 20 MS2s compared to the 88 MS3 controls (73.5 [SD = 4.5] vs 58.1 [SD = 13.1] on 80 point scale, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: A short workshop and GOSCE were effective in teaching patient-centered EHR use. This curriculum is now a permanent part of our Clinical Skills course. Clerkship students who did not receive our curriculum may have been exposed to negative role-modeling on the wards. To address this, training residents and faculty on patient-centered EHR use skills should be considered. ABBREVIATIONS: EHR: Electronic health record; EHR: Electronic health record; SP: Standardized patient.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Registros Electrónicos de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Atención Dirigida al Paciente/organización & administración , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Simulación de Paciente , Relaciones Médico-Paciente
20.
Acad Med ; 92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions): S7-S11, 2017 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29065017
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