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1.
BMJ Open Qual ; 7(4): e000417, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30515469

RESUMEN

Background: One in three people over the age of 65 fall every year, with 1/3 sustaining at least moderate injury. Falls risk reduction requires an interprofessional health team approach. The literature is lacking in effective models to teach students how to work collaboratively in interprofessional teams for geriatric falls prevention. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, administration and outcome measures of an education programme to teach principles of interprofessional care for older adults in the context of falls prevention. Methods: Students from three academic institutions representing 12 health disciplines took part in the education programme over 18 months (n=237). A mixed method one-group pretest and post-test experimental design was implemented to measure the impact of a multistep education model on progression in interprofessional collaboration competencies and satisfaction. Results: Paired t-tests of pre-education to posteducation measures of Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale scores (n=136) demonstrated statistically significant increase in subscales and total scores (p<0.001). Qualitative satisfaction results were strongly positive. Discussion: Results of this study indicate that active interprofessional education can result in positive student attitude regarding interprofessional team-based care, and satisfaction with learning. Lessons learnt in a rapid cycle plan-do-study-act approach are shared to guide replication efforts for other educators. Conclusion: Effective models to teach falls prevention interventions and interprofessional practice are not yet established. This education model is easily replicable and can be used to teach interprofessional teamwork competency skills in falls and other geriatric syndromes.

2.
Am J Infect Control ; 41(9): 793-8, 2013 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23433982

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Transmission of health care-associated infections (HAIs) has been primarily attributed to health care workers, and hand hygiene is considered the most important means to reduce transmission. Whereas hand hygiene research has focused on reducing health care worker hand contamination and improving hand hygiene compliance, contamination of patients' hands and their role in the transmission of HAIs remains unknown. METHODS: Patients' hands were sampled by a "glove juice" recovery method and enumerated for the presence of common health care-associated pathogens. Patient demographics and other covariates were collected to determine their association with patient hand contamination. Patient attitudes and practices toward hand hygiene were also surveyed and analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients in the study, 39% of hands were contaminated with at least 1 pathogenic organism, and 8% were contaminated with 2 or more pathogens 48 hours after admission. Patient admission from or discharge to an outside institution and self-reported functional limitations were the only covariates that were significantly associated with hand contamination. CONCLUSION: Pathogenic organisms can be frequently detected on hands of acute care patients. Future studies are needed to better understand the relationship between patient hand contamination and the acquisition of HAIs in addition to the role patient hand hygiene can play in reducing HAIs.


Asunto(s)
Infección Hospitalaria/epidemiología , Infección Hospitalaria/transmisión , Adhesión a Directriz/estadística & datos numéricos , Higiene de las Manos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Cooperación del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Infección Hospitalaria/prevención & control , Femenino , Mano/microbiología , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Adulto Joven
3.
Int J Older People Nurs ; 4(3): 194-202, 2009 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20925776

RESUMEN

Background. The prevalence of delirium in acute care hospitals ranges from 5-86%. Delirious patients are at greater risk of negative health outcomes and their care is often more costly. Aim. To determine the feasibility of a full-scale trial to test the effectiveness of an intervention designed to improve delirium prevention, detection and intervention in an acute care hospital. Design. A delirium prevention protocol was designed by an interdisciplinary group of clinicians and implemented on intervention unit patients who passed a mental status screen, were at high risk for delirium according to the modified NEECHAM scale, and met other eligibility criteria. These patients were reviewed at daily interdisciplinary team meetings and team recommendations were placed in the patient's chart. On the usual care unit, physicians were notified if their patients were at high risk, but the delirium protocol was not implemented. Methods. The delirium protocol was pilot tested with 35 high risk patients on an Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit. Outcomes were compared to 35 high risk patients on a similar medical unit without the delirium protocol. Results. The main outcome examined whether there is a difference in average day 3 modified NEECHAM scores comparing the intervention and control groups. The mean modified NEECHAMs on day 3 were not statistically significantly different (intervention group 3.76 and control group 3.24) (P= 0.368). Baseline NEECHAM scores did not correlate well with development of delirium (P = 0.204). A history of confusion during a previous hospitalization was the strongest predictor of developing delirium during the current hospitalization. Conclusion. This pilot study was not powered to detect an effect of the intervention, however, feasibility for a fully powered trial was established. Relevance to clinical practice. Completion of the NEECHAM screen every shift was not considered burdensome for either nurses or patients and may help identify acute delirium.

4.
Gastroenterol Nurs ; 31(3): 198-208, 2008 May-Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18542021

RESUMEN

Clinical research is necessary for developing nursing's body of knowledge and improving the quality of gastroenterology nursing care. The support and participation of nursing staff are crucial to conducting interventional research. Identification of characteristics of nurses and their work settings that facilitate or impede participation in research is needed. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the effect of personal and professional characteristics and attitudes about nursing research on staff nurses' participation in a clinical nursing research project. A questionnaire measuring nurses' attitudes, perceptions of availability of support, and research use was distributed to staff nurses working on an endoscopy lab and two same-day surgery units where a nursing research study had recently been conducted. Investigator-developed items measured nurses' attitudes about the utility and feasibility of the interventions tested in the original study. A total of 36 usable questionnaires comprised the sample. Factor analysis of the two questionnaires resulted in three-factor (Importance of Research, Interest in Research, and Environment Support of Research) and two-factor (Value of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions [CBIs] and Participation in Study) solutions, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for the five factors between nurses who did (n = 19) and those who did not (n = 17) participate in the original study. The Participation in Research Factor was significantly negatively correlated with years in nursing (r = -.336, p < .05) and positively correlated with the importance of research factor (r = .501, p < .01). Importance of research was negatively correlated with years in nursing (r = -.435, p < .01) and positively correlated with value of CBI (r = .439, p < .01) and participation in study (r = .501, p < .01). Findings from the study will contribute to the body of knowledge about factors that facilitate or impede staff nurses' involvement in research. This knowledge will be useful for nurse researchers planning intervention studies to forecast and foster staff nurse involvement in their projects. Findings may also be useful to nurse managers, nurse educators, and staff development personnel in assessing and promoting staff nurses' involvement in research.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Investigación en Enfermería Clínica/organización & administración , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/psicología , Adulto , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Ambulatorios/enfermería , Cateterismo Periférico/efectos adversos , Conducta de Elección , Investigación en Enfermería Clínica/educación , Endoscopía/enfermería , Análisis Factorial , Femenino , Ambiente de Instituciones de Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Motivación , Investigación Metodológica en Enfermería , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/educación , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/organización & administración , Dolor/etiología , Dolor/prevención & control , Análisis de Componente Principal , Investigación Cualitativa , Terapia por Relajación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Carga de Trabajo/psicología
5.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 23(3): 272-6, 2008 Jul-Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18562871

RESUMEN

Contaminated blood cultures result in increased healthcare utilization. Poor skin preparation is usually the cause of contamination. Our study results showed a significant decrease in contamination rates using 2% chlorhexidine and 70% isopropanol (Chloraprep) versus tincture of iodine. Adoption of this technique throughout our institution is expected to result in a savings of 875000 dollars per year, as well as decreased discomfort for the patient.


Asunto(s)
2-Propanol/administración & dosificación , Antiinfecciosos Locales/administración & dosificación , Antisepsia/métodos , Recolección de Muestras de Sangre , Clorhexidina/administración & dosificación , Yodo/administración & dosificación , 2-Propanol/economía , Administración Cutánea , Antiinfecciosos Locales/economía , Benchmarking , Recolección de Muestras de Sangre/métodos , Clorhexidina/economía , Investigación en Enfermería Clínica , Ahorro de Costo , Combinación de Medicamentos , Enfermería de Urgencia , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Humanos , Yodo/economía , Ohio , Piel/microbiología , Cuidados de la Piel/economía , Cuidados de la Piel/métodos , Cuidados de la Piel/enfermería
6.
Am J Nurs ; 108(5): 54-63; quiz 63-4, 2008 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18434802

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Because patients' perspectives on total knee replacement (TKR) surgery have rarely been the topic of research, this study sought to describe their pre- and postoperative experiences. METHODS: Using a qualitative descriptive design, researchers collected data from a convenience sample of 27 patients who were about to undergo or had recently undergone TKR. Preoperative data were obtained in focus group sessions (n = 17); postoperative data were obtained in individual interviews (n = 10). All data-collection sessions were tape-recorded and transcribed, and transcripts were analyzed. The researchers isolated themes by identifying recurrent words and phrases and then sorted the data into thematic categories. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged. First, many participants delayed surgery for months to years, despite increasing pain and limitation. Second, once participants decided to proceed with surgery, they entered a period of waiting and worrying about what would happen during and after surgery. Third, both pre- and postoperative participants struggled with the need for independence, as well as with learning to accept the new knee. And fourth, patients experienced postoperative pain associated with surgery and rehabilitation, yet reported having hope that they'd regain function. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that patients need to be better educated and supported before and after TKR surgery. More research is needed to shed light on how patients' experiences influence their decisions about the surgery and its outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/psicología , Satisfacción del Paciente , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/psicología , Cuidados Preoperatorios/psicología , Actividades Cotidianas , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Ansiedad/etiología , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Educación del Paciente como Asunto
7.
J Nurs Adm ; 33(10): 532-7, 2003 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-14551471

RESUMEN

The Nursing Research Committee at a community teaching hospital conducted a research study on alternatives to restraints in a confused population. The authors describe the process this committee used to successfully conduct the study, from starting a research focus group and setting goals to choosing a research topic, designing the study, and collecting data. Critical success factors for completing research by committee are described.


Asunto(s)
Comités de Ética en Investigación/organización & administración , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería/organización & administración , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/organización & administración , Comité de Profesionales/organización & administración , Confusión/enfermería , Recolección de Datos , Hospitales Comunitarios , Hospitales de Enseñanza , Humanos , Rol de la Enfermera , Proyectos Piloto , Desarrollo de Programa , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Restricción Física , Virginia
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