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1.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 2020 Nov 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33250170

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Zirconia is a relatively new dental material used for indirect dental restorations. Little is known about how dental practitioners are using this material in their practice. METHODS: A survey on zirconia restorations was developed and administered electronically through e-mail communications to the American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel on August 31, 2020. Reminders were sent to nonrespondents, and the survey closed 2 weeks after the launch date. RESULTS: When using zirconia for a restoration, respondents choose it to restore natural teeth (99%) more often than implants (76%). Almost all respondents (98%) use it for posterior crowns, whereas approximately two-thirds (61%) use it for anterior crowns. Restoration removal or replacement and shade matching and translucency were the top 2 cited disadvantages of zirconia, whereas most of the respondents (57%) cited flexural strength or fracture resistance as the biggest advantage. Fine diamonds and ceramic polishers are used most often to polish and adjust zirconia restorations, whereas coarse diamond rotary instruments and those made specifically for zirconia are most frequently used for removing these restorations. Compared with metal ceramic restorations, more than 50% of respondents experience debonding more often with zirconia restorations. CONCLUSIONS: Dentists recognize the favorable fracture resistance and flexural strength properties of zirconia, and most use similar techniques when adjusting and removing this material. Removing these restorations and shade matching are a struggle for many. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Dentists may benefit from tips on the best methods to remove, shade match, and adhesively bond zirconia restorations.

2.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 151(10): 796-797.e2, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32979959

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Bonding crowns and bridges with resin cement can improve retention and reinforcement of the restoration. However, there is variation in the steps taken by different practitioners to achieve this goal. METHODS: The authors developed a survey on bonding dental crowns and bridges with resin cement and distributed it electronically to the American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel on May 22, 2020. The survey remained open for 2 weeks. Descriptive data analysis was conducted using SAS Version 9.4. RESULTS: A total of 326 panelists responded to the survey, and 86% of respondents who place crowns or bridges use resin cements for bonding. When placing a lithium disilicate restoration, an almost equal proportion of respondents etch it with hydrofluoric acid in their office or asked the laboratory to do it for them, and more than two-thirds use a silane primer before bonding. For zirconia restorations, 70% reported their restorations are sandblasted in the laboratory, and 39% use a primer containing 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate. One-half of respondents clean their lithium disilicate or zirconia restorations with a cleaning solution. Resin cements used with a primer in the etch-and-rinse mode are the most widely used. The technique used to cure and clean excess resin cement varies among respondents. CONCLUSIONS: The types of resin cements used, tooth preparation, crown or bridge preparation, and bonding technique vary among this sample. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Although many dentists bond crowns and bridges on the basis of best practices, improvement in the process may be achieved by dentists communicating with their laboratory to confirm the steps performed there, ensuring an effective cleaning technique is used after try-in and verifying that the correct primer is used with their chosen restorative material.


Asunto(s)
Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Cementos de Resina , American Dental Association , Coronas , Cementos Dentales , Materiales Dentales , Porcelana Dental , Análisis del Estrés Dental , Humanos , Ensayo de Materiales , Propiedades de Superficie , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
3.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 151(7): 544-545.e2, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32498964

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The ability to polymerize light-activated dental materials with dental light-curing units (DLCUs) has revolutionized dentistry. However, proper DLCU use is essential for ensuring the effectiveness and performance of these materials. METHODS: The authors developed an electronic cross-sectional survey in the American Dental Association Qualtrics Research Core platform. The survey included questions about DLCU use, unit type and selection, training, maintenance, technique, and safety measures. The authors deployed the survey to 809 American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) panelists on October 9, 2019, and sent reminder links to nonrespondents 1 week later. They conducted exploratory and descriptive analyses using SAS software Version 9.4. RESULTS: Of the 353 ACE panelists who completed the survey, most used a DLCU in their practices (99%), and light-emitting diode multiwave units were the most common type of DLCU units (55%). Dentists use DLCUs for over one-half of their appointments each day (mean [standard deviation], 59% [22%]). Regarding technique, respondents reported that they modify their curing technique on the basis of material thickness (79%) and material type or light tip-to-target distances (59%). Maintenance practices varied, with two-thirds of respondents reporting that they periodically check their DLCUs' light output. CONCLUSIONS: DLCUs are an integral part of a general dentist's daily practice, but maintenance, ocular safety, and technique varied widely among this sample. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Because clinical effectiveness requires delivery of an adequate amount of light energy at the appropriate wavelength, variation in DLCU maintenance, safety, and techniques suggest that dentists could benefit from additional guidance and training on DLCU operation.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas , Luces de Curación Dental , American Dental Association , Estudios Transversales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
4.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 151(4): 303-304.e2, 2020 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32222178

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted oncovirus associated with several malignancies, including oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The 9-valent HPV vaccine can help protect against the high-risk HPV strains most commonly associated with HPV-related cancers. METHODS: The authors used an electronic survey to assess the roles of dentists and their team members in discussing the HPV vaccine, as well as administering the vaccine in a dental setting. On December 6, 2019, the authors e-mailed a survey link to the American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel (n = 813), a sample of American Dental Association member dentists. After 1 e-mail reminder, the survey closed on December 19, 2019, and the authors conducted exploratory and descriptive data analyses using SAS Version 9.4 (SAS). RESULTS: A total of 329 dentists responded to the survey, and 83 (25%) of them reported that they or their team members discuss the implications of the HPV vaccine with age-eligible patients or their parents or guardians. Dentists lead two-thirds (n = 218) of the discussions, and the clinical examination is the most frequent moment during the patient visit in which HPV-related topics are discussed. Some of the top reasons respondents mentioned for not discussing the vaccine in their practice were the perception that these discussions are best left to other health care professionals and not knowing how to address the topic with patients. If the scope of dental practice is expanded to include administering the vaccine, 125 (38%) of respondents would feel uncomfortable administering the vaccine. The most common potential barriers to administering the vaccine in a dental setting include obtaining reimbursement and vaccine management and preservation. CONCLUSIONS: The survey results suggest that dentists' comfort levels and perceived roles in discussing and administering the HPV vaccine vary. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: There is a need to further define the role of dentists and their team members in the promotion and administration of the HPV vaccine. Resources for dentists and dental team members may be helpful to support professional education and communication about the HPV vaccine.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Papillomavirus , Vacunas contra Papillomavirus , American Dental Association , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
5.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 143(2): 157-63, 2012 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22298557

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Opportunities exist to promote minimally invasive dentistry by repairing rather than replacing defective and failing direct resin-based composite restorations. The authors conducted a study to investigate the current teaching of such techniques in U.S. and Canadian dental schools. METHODS: In late 2010, the authors, with the assistance of the Consortium of Operative Dentistry Educators, invited 67 U.S. and Canadian dental schools to participate in an Internet-based survey. RESULTS: The response rate was 72 percent. Eighty-eight percent of the dental schools taught repair of defective direct resin-based composite restorations. Of these schools, 79 percent reported providing both didactic and clinical teaching. CONCLUSIONS: Although teaching repair of defective resin-based composite restorations was included in the didactic curricula of most schools, students in some schools did not gain experience in minimally invasive management of defective resin-based composite restorations by means of performing repair procedures. The American Dental Association's Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature does not have a procedure code for resin-based composite restoration repairs, which may limit patients' access to this dental treatment. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Teaching dental students minimally invasive dentistry procedures, including restoration repair, extends the longevity of dental restorations and reduces detrimental effects on teeth induced by invasive procedures, thereby serving the interests of patients.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas/química , Materiales Dentales/química , Fracaso de la Restauración Dental , Reparación de Restauración Dental , Restauración Dental Permanente , Operatoria Dental/educación , Canadá , Color , Curriculum , Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Adaptación Marginal Dental , Alisadura de la Restauración Dental , Restauración Dental Permanente/métodos , Humanos , Internet , Retratamiento , Facultades de Odontología , Propiedades de Superficie , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Enseñanza/métodos , Estados Unidos
6.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 142(6): 612-20, 2011 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21628682

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Resin-based composites are an increasingly popular material for restoring posterior teeth, permitting minimally invasive cavity preparations and esthetic restorations. The authors investigated current teaching of the placement of posterior resin-based composites in U.S. and Canadian dental schools. METHODS: In late 2009 and early 2010, the authors, with the assistance of the Consortium of Operative Dentistry Educators (CODE), invited 67 dental schools to participate in an Internet-based survey. RESULTS: The response rate was 73 percent. Although all schools taught the placement of resin-based composites in occlusal and most occlusoproximal cavities, eight schools (16 percent) did not teach placement of three-surface occlusoproximal resin-based composite restorations in permanent molars. Resin-based composites accounted for 49 percent of direct posterior restorations placed by dental students in 2009 and 2010, a 30 percent increase from 2005. CONCLUSIONS: Teaching placement of posterior resin-based composites continues to increase in dental schools in the United States and Canada, with predoctoral students gaining, on average, an equal amount of experience placing posterior resin-based composites and amalgams in terms of numbers of restorations. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Evidence-based, up-to-date teaching programs, including those in operative dentistry, are needed to best prepare students for careers in dentistry.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas , Caries Dental/terapia , Materiales Dentales , Restauración Dental Permanente/métodos , Operatoria Dental/educación , Educación en Odontología , Diente Premolar/patología , Canadá , Contraindicaciones , Luces de Curación Dental/clasificación , Curriculum , Amalgama Dental , Preparación de la Cavidad Dental/clasificación , Preparación de la Cavidad Dental/métodos , Pulido Dental/métodos , Restauración Dental Permanente/instrumentación , Estética Dental , Humanos , Bandas de Matriz , Diente Molar/patología , Cementos de Resina , Dique de Goma , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Factores de Tiempo , Estados Unidos
7.
Gen Dent ; 57(2): 151-6; quiz 157-8, 2009.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19552365

RESUMEN

Dental erosion can be difficult to detect, especially in the early stages when lesions are subtle and can be easily overlooked. Patients often are not aware of erosion until the dentition has sustained severe damage that requires extensive and expensive dental rehabilitation. The pH of stomach acid is much lower than the critical pH of enamel dissolution; therefore, reflux of stomach contents into the oral cavity over an extended period of time can cause severe loss of tooth structure. Dental treatment for reflux-induced erosion should focus not only on appropriate restoration but also on all available preventive measures, such as neutralization of acid and remineralization or strengthening of enamel against acid attack. Dentists must maintain a high degree of suspicion for reflux-induced erosion whenever a patient displays symptoms of acid reflux disease or a pattern of erosion that suggests an intrinsic source of acid exposure.


Asunto(s)
Reflujo Gastroesofágico/complicaciones , Erosión de los Dientes/etiología , Solubilidad del Esmalte Dental/fisiología , Ácido Gástrico/fisiología , Reflujo Gastroesofágico/prevención & control , Reflujo Gastroesofágico/terapia , Humanos , Concentración de Iones de Hidrógeno , Sustancias Protectoras/uso terapéutico , Fluoruro de Sodio/uso terapéutico , Erosión de los Dientes/prevención & control , Erosión de los Dientes/terapia , Remineralización Dental
8.
J Am Chem Soc ; 130(31): 10354-68, 2008 Aug 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18613668

RESUMEN

Pyridyl-amido catalysts have emerged recently with great promise for olefin polymerization. Insights into the activation chemistry are presented in an initial attempt to understand the polymerization mechanisms of these important catalysts. The activation of C1-symmetric arylcyclometallated hafnium pyridyl-amido precatalysts, denoted Me2Hf{N(-),N,C(-)} (1, aryl = naphthyl; 2, aryl = phenyl), with both Lewis (B(C6F5)3 and [CPh3][B(C6F5)4]) and Brønsted ([HNR3][B(C6F5)4]) acids is investigated. Reactions of 1 with B(C6F5)3 lead to abstraction of a methyl group and formation of a single inner-sphere diastereoisomeric ion pair [MeHf{N(-),N,C(-)}][MeB(C6F5)3] (3). A 1:1 mixture of the two possible outer-sphere diastereoisomeric ion pairs [MeHf{N(-),N,C(-)}][B(C6F5)4] (4) is obtained when [CPh3][B(C6F5)4] is used. [HNR3][B(C6F5)4] selectively protonates the aryl arm of the tridentate ligand in both precatalysts 1 and 2. A remarkably stable [Me2Hf{N(-),N,C2}][B(C6F5)4] (5) outer-sphere ion pair is formed when the naphthyl substituent is present. The stability is attributed to a hafnium/eta(2)-naphthyl interaction and the release of an eclipsing H-H interaction between naphthyl and pyridine moieties, as evidenced through extensive NMR studies, X-ray single crystal investigation and DFT calculations. When the aryl substituent is phenyl, [Me2Hf{N(-),N,C2}][B(C6F5)4] (10) is originally obtained from protonation of 2, but this species rapidly undergoes remetalation, methane evolution, and amine coordination, giving a diastereomeric mixture of [MeHf{N(-),N,C(-)}NR3][B(C6F5)4] (11). This species transforms over time into the trianionic-ligated [Hf{N(-),C(-),N,C(-)}NR3][B(C6F5)4] (12) through activation of a C-H bond of an amido-isopropyl group. In contrast, ion pair 5 does not spontaneously undergo remetalation of the naphthyl moiety; it reacts with NMe2Ph leading to [MeHf{N(-),N}NMe2C6H4][B(C6F5)4] (7) through ortho-metalation of the aniline. Ion pair 7 successively undergoes a complex transformation ultimately leading to [Hf{N(-),C(-),N,C(-)}NMe2Ph][B(C6F5)4] (8), strictly analogous to 12. The reaction of 5 with aliphatic amines leads to the formation of a single diastereomeric ion pair [MeHf{N(-),N,C(-)}NR3][B(C6F5)4] (9). These differences in activation chemistry are manifested in the polymerization characteristics of these different precatalyst/cocatalyst combinations. Relatively long induction times are observed for propene polymerizations with the naphthyl precatalyst 1 activated with [HNMe3Ph][B(C6F5)4]. However, no induction time is present when 1 is activated with Lewis acids. Similarly, precatalyst 2 shows no induction period with either Lewis or Brønsted acids. Correlation of the solution behavior of these ion pairs and the polymerization characteristics of these various species provides a basis for an initial picture of the polymerization mechanism of these important catalyst systems.

9.
J Esthet Restor Dent ; 19(5): 256-64; discussion 264, 2007.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17877624

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: Reports of sensitivity vary greatly from one study to another, probably because studies are small. Generally, only the percentage of subjects is reported. PURPOSE: This study reports sensitivity using a large database. We investigated the source, duration, and timing of sensitivity during 14 days of active bleaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and seventy-two people recorded sensitivity from any of the five sources on a daily basis. RESULTS: No one withdrew from the study because of sensitivity. Forty-seven percent of participants experienced sensitivity. Seventy-seven percent had sensitivity of 3 or fewer days. Temperature sensitivity tended to occur later in the 14-day bleaching cycle, and hot and cold sensitivity tended to occur together. CONCLUSIONS: There was great variability in sensitivity levels from person to person. Temperature sensitivity tended to occur later in the active phase of bleaching, whereas irritation of the tongue tended to occur earlier. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from a large group of people are more likely to include a wide cross-section of the population sampled. This data provides practitioners with a better estimate of what their patients are likely to experience. It is estimated that, during 2 weeks of active bleaching, 77% of people will experience 3 or fewer days of sensitivity. On average, sensitivity is short-lived, thus making it is easy to underestimate the importance of discussing sensitivity with patients considering bleaching. However, for some, the duration of sensitivity is much greater and has a very negative impact on satisfaction.


Asunto(s)
Dispositivos para el Autocuidado Bucal , Sensibilidad de la Dentina/inducido químicamente , Encía/efectos de los fármacos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Decoloración de Dientes/terapia , Administración Tópica , Análisis de Varianza , Peróxido de Carbamida , Estudios Transversales , Sensibilidad de la Dentina/prevención & control , Relación Dosis-Respuesta a Droga , Método Doble Ciego , Combinación de Medicamentos , Fluoruros Tópicos/administración & dosificación , Humanos , Nitratos/administración & dosificación , Peróxidos/administración & dosificación , Peróxidos/efectos adversos , Faringe/efectos de los fármacos , Compuestos de Potasio/administración & dosificación , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Fluoruro de Sodio/administración & dosificación , Factores de Tiempo , Lengua/efectos de los fármacos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Urea/administración & dosificación , Urea/efectos adversos , Urea/análogos & derivados
10.
Quintessence Int ; 37(5): 361-8, 2006 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16683683

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, clinical trial was to compare the marginal seal of 2 packable resin composite materials in moderate to large lesions on molars. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Fifty participants in need of a moderate to large Class 2 or complex Class 1 molar restoration were randomly distributed into 4 groups, to receive either Alert (Jeneric/Pentron) or SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk) resin composite with or without a surface sealer. Each participant received one restoration. With the exception that study protocol limited increments to no more than 4 mm, teeth were restored according to the manufacturers' instructions, and surface sealer was applied after finishing in the designated groups. Use of Alert includes routine placement of a flowable composite liner. Clinical performance of the restorations was evaluated in 8 categories at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. The 2 materials were compared to determine if a difference in marginal seal existed between groups. The number of restorations exhibiting marginal staining was compared using Fischer's exact test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Six participants did not present for the 12-month recall. At 12 months, 19 (90.5%) Alert restorations and 15 (68.2%) SureFil restorations did not exhibit marginal staining. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 restorative materials for marginal staining. Overall, 3 restorations were rated as failures. CONCLUSION: At 12 months, materials placed with a flowable liner were not associated with a significant reduction in marginal staining.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas/química , Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Restauración Dental Permanente , Adulto , Color , Caries Dental/clasificación , Recubrimiento de la Cavidad Dental , Preparación de la Cavidad Dental/clasificación , Adaptación Marginal Dental , Fracaso de la Restauración Dental , Método Doble Ciego , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Diente Molar/patología , Recurrencia , Propiedades de Superficie
11.
Quintessence Int ; 35(9): 693-8, 2004 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-15470992

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Transient sensitivity during bleaching is generally reported to affect 67% of patients. While most people tolerate this sensitivity, some find it impossible to continue treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of an experimental, low-sensitivity bleaching agent. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Twenty-two participants bleached for a minimum of 6 hours per night over a 2-week period. The bleaching agent used, Experimental Product E, is a 10% carbamide peroxide gel containing potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride. Evaluations were performed at baseline and 1,2,13, and 26 weeks. Color change was measured using a value-ordered Vita classic shade guide and a colorimeter. Sensitivity of the teeth, gingiva, tongue, and/or throat was measured daily using a patient log. RESULTS: The median color change after 2 weeks was eight tabs. Approximately 36% reported sensitivity during the active whitening phase of the study. As a group, participants reported sensitivity during 13.7% of the total days spent whitening. CONCLUSION: Experimental Product E was shown to be safe. Participants experienced minor sensitivity during the active bleaching phase only. Experimental Product E was shown to be an effective bleaching agent for the subjects tested in this study.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Urea/análogos & derivados , Adulto , Análisis de Varianza , Peróxido de Carbamida , Cariostáticos , Color , Dispositivos para el Autocuidado Bucal/efectos adversos , Sensibilidad de la Dentina/etiología , Sensibilidad de la Dentina/prevención & control , Combinación de Medicamentos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Nitratos , Oxidantes , Peróxidos , Compuestos de Potasio , Seguridad , Fluoruro de Sodio , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/instrumentación
12.
J Dent Educ ; 68(1): 64-70, 2004 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-14761175

RESUMEN

Computers are becoming an integral part of dental education and dental practice. Rapid prototyping is a technique for the production of solid objects from computer models. The variety of rapid prototyping devices and materials that can be processed is increasing all the time. In this article, the authors present a discriminative learning device and associated exercises for developing visual recognition skills and examine the potential for the application of rapid prototyping to the operative dentistry curriculum. Other rapid prototyping technologies as applied in dentistry are also discussed.


Asunto(s)
Diseño Asistido por Computadora , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Modelos Dentales , Operatoria Dental/educación , Imagenología Tridimensional/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Simulación por Computador , Preparación de la Cavidad Dental/métodos , Operatoria Dental/métodos , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Georgia , Humanos , Procesamiento de Imagen Asistido por Computador/instrumentación , Procesamiento de Imagen Asistido por Computador/métodos , Tecnología Odontológica/educación , Tecnología Odontológica/métodos
13.
Oper Dent ; 28(6): 808-15, 2003.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-14653298

RESUMEN

Polishing composite restorations at recall prophylaxis may affect their surface roughness. This investigation evaluated the effect of prophy paste on the surface roughness of a microfilled (Filtek A110) and a microhybrid (Filtek Z250) resin composite before and after simulated toothbrushing. Twenty, two-sided samples of both materials were fabricated in acrylic molds against a Mylar strip (baseline). Three roughness readings were recorded for each surface using a Surfanalyzer 5400 to determine the mean roughness. The samples were finished and polished with the Sof-Lex disk system and the surface roughness (Ra) was re-measured. Samples were randomly assigned and five surfaces for each material were polished with Nupro coarse, medium, fine or Clinpro prophy paste and the surface roughness measured again. All surfaces were brushed 60,000 times at 1.5Hz using a 2N brush-head force (Manly V-8 cross-brushing machine) in a 50:50 (w/w) slurry of toothpaste and water. The surface roughness was measured followed by the application of prophy paste as previously described and this final roughness recorded. Data were analyzed using repeated measures two-factor ANOVA with TUKEY HSD pairwise comparison as appropriate (alpha = 0.05). No significant difference in surface roughness was determined between the microfilled and microhybrid materials at baseline or disk treatment, yet significant differences were observed following brushing and/or prophy paste application. In conclusion, although baseline and disk treated surfaces were not significantly different in microfilled versus microhybrid composites, subsequent prophy paste application and/or simulated toothbrushing caused significant differences.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas/química , Profilaxis Dental , Restauración Dental Permanente , Cepillado Dental , Pastas de Dientes/química , Análisis de Varianza , Pulido Dental/métodos , Profilaxis Dental/instrumentación , Humanos , Análisis por Apareamiento , Ensayo de Materiales , Estrés Mecánico , Propiedades de Superficie , Cepillado Dental/instrumentación , Agua/química
14.
J Prosthet Dent ; 90(4): 401-5, 2003 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-14564295

RESUMEN

The guidelines recommended in the literature for the convergence angle of a crown preparation vary from 3 to 24 degrees. There is a lack of guidelines on techniques to achieve a specific axial inclination. The purpose of this article was to present a practical technique, with a diamond rotary cutting instrument of known axial inclination, to determine the diamond rotary cutting instrument angulations required to achieve the desired axial inclination of a preparation.


Asunto(s)
Coronas , Preparación Protodóncica del Diente/métodos , Diamante , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos , Rotación , Propiedades de Superficie , Preparación Protodóncica del Diente/instrumentación
15.
J Prosthet Dent ; 89(3): 292-6, 2003 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-12644806

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Many dental patients suffer from upper airway sleep disorders (UASD) that affect the quantity and quality of their sleep. These disorders vary from minor annoyances to life-threatening conditions. Even though dentists can play a role in the successful treatment of these patients with oral devices, few do. This lack of participation, in part, may be due to lack of education. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine which North American dental schools include the treatment of UASD in their curriculum. This information may prove helpful to other schools in determining whether, and to what degree, they should teach about UASD and its treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A survey instrument (questionnaire) was mailed to all of the North American dental schools (n = 64) affiliated with the American Association of Dental Schools. The questionnaire consisted of 9 multipart questions. Major categories of questions included the following: (1) Is the subject of UASD a part of the school curriculum? If so, in what department is it taught? (2) Are oral devices fabricated for patients or is the experience only at the didactic level? (3) What diagnostic procedures are required? (4) What types of oral devices are fabricated and what is the success rate/recall frequency? (5) What is the patient source? (6) If this subject area is not covered either didactically or clinically, why not? The data were analyzed by use of descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Forty-three of the 64 schools that received the survey responded. Forty-two percent of the schools that responded are teaching the treatment of UASD with oral devices. There is no apparent consensus with regard to whether to teach the subject, at what level, or to what degree. CONCLUSION: Even though many dental patients suffer from potentially life-threatening sleep disorders, many of which could be treated with oral devices, fewer than half of the reporting dental schools currently include this area as part of their curriculum. This lack of inclusion is caused primarily by a lack of familiarity with the information available and a lack of available curriculum time.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación en Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos , América del Norte , Planificación de Atención al Paciente , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño/diagnóstico , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño/terapia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Enseñanza/métodos , Resultado del Tratamiento
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