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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9348, 2021 Apr 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33931680

RESUMEN

Degradation at the modular head-neck interface in total hip arthroplasty (THA) is predominately expressed in the form of corrosion and fretting, potentially causing peri-prosthetic failure by adverse reactions to metal debris. This retrieval study aimed to quantify variations in stem taper surface topographies and to assess the influence on the formation of corrosion and/or fretting in titanium alloy stem tapers combined with metal and ceramic heads. Four hip stem designs (Alloclassic, CLS, Bicontact and SL-Plus) were characterized using high-resolution 3D microscopy, and corrosion and fretting were rated using the Goldberg scoring scheme. Quantification of the taper surface topographies revealed a high variability in surface characteristics between threaded stem tapers: Alloclassic and CLS tapers feature deeply threaded trapezoid-shaped profiles with thread heights over 65 µm. The sawtooth-shaped Bicontact and triangular SL-Plus taper are characterized by low thread heights below 14 µm. Significantly lower corrosion and fretting scores were observed in lightly threaded compared to deeply threaded tapers in ceramic head combinations. No significant differences in corrosion or fretting scores with thread height were found in pairings with metal heads. Understanding the relationship between stem taper surface topography and the formation of corrosion and fretting could help to improve the performance of modern THAs and lead to longer-lasting clinical results.

3.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33638676

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: In our previous studies, we were able to identify anatomical differences as a predictor for aseptic loosening following primary and revision surgery with the use of rotating hinge prosthesis. This study was performed to answer following question: can a novel radiological classification system of the distal femur be identified? MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 200 patients who received standardized anteroposterior (AP) and lateral views of the knee joint were included in this study. On AP radiographs, we measured the distance between inner diameter of the femur at 20 cm proximally from the knee and at a point 2 cm proximally from the adductor tubercle. The ratio of the inner diameter of the femoral canal at 20 cm proximal of knee joint to the inner diameter of medullary canal at 2 cm proximal of adductor tubercle was used as a novel index ratio. Two observers blindly and independently reviewed the anteroposterior radiographs twice. RESULTS: Three groups of anatomical classification can be constructed for each sex according to the 25th and 75th percentiles. A higher distribution of Type C was found in female patients. The median intra-observer reliability for rater 1 was 0.995 (IQR 0.994-0.997). We had also a high inter-observer reliability with ICC of 0.997 (95% CI 0.996-0.998). CONCLUSIONS: The novel classification presents three different types of the knee joint for male and female patients. Type C has a wider inner diaphyseal diameter compared to Type A with a narrow inner diaphyseal diameter.

4.
Hip Int ; : 1120700021991467, 2021 Feb 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33601967

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: This study was undertaken to analyse the outcome of 1-stage exchange in the management of streptococcal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the hip at a single hospital. METHODS: We identified 30 patients with a streptococcal PJI of the hip who had been treated by 1-stage exchange at our hospital between 2002 and 2017. Postoperative complications and the need for any subsequent re-revision for infection or other reasons were analysed. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) was evaluated at final follow-up. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.2 years (SD 4.1). The overall re-revision rate for any reason was 53% (16/30) at a mean 5.3 years (SD 0.68 years). Re-revision for infection was 20% (6/30) at a mean 1.8 years (SD 0.74 years). All re-revisions for PJI (6/6; 100%) were for relapse of the streptococcal infection. At final follow-up, the mean HHS was 68 points (SD 20). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of re-revision after 1-stage exchange for streptococcal PJI is high. Eradication of a streptococcal PJI of the hip remains challenging. Further extensive and comparative studies between 1-and 2-stage exchange are encouraged.

5.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(2): e1009304, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33544760

RESUMEN

S. epidermidis is a substantial component of the human skin microbiota, but also one of the major causes of nosocomial infection in the context of implanted medical devices. We here aimed to advance the understanding of S. epidermidis genotypes and phenotypes conducive to infection establishment. Furthermore, we investigate the adaptation of individual clonal lines to the infection lifestyle based on the detailed analysis of individual S. epidermidis populations of 23 patients suffering from prosthetic joint infection. Analysis of invasive and colonizing S. epidermidis provided evidence that invasive S. epidermidis are characterized by infection-supporting phenotypes (e.g. increased biofilm formation, growth in nutrient poor media and antibiotic resistance), as well as specific genetic traits. The discriminating gene loci were almost exclusively assigned to the mobilome. Here, in addition to IS256 and SCCmec, chromosomally integrated phages was identified for the first time. These phenotypic and genotypic features were more likely present in isolates belonging to sequence type (ST) 2. By comparing seven patient-matched nasal and invasive S. epidermidis isolates belonging to identical genetic lineages, infection-associated phenotypic and genotypic changes were documented. Besides increased biofilm production, the invasive isolates were characterized by better growth in nutrient-poor media and reduced hemolysis. By examining several colonies grown in parallel from each infection, evidence for genetic within-host population heterogeneity was obtained. Importantly, subpopulations carrying IS insertions in agrC, mutations in the acetate kinase (AckA) and deletions in the SCCmec element emerged in several infections. In summary, these results shed light on the multifactorial processes of infection adaptation and demonstrate how S. epidermidis is able to flexibly repurpose and edit factors important for colonization to facilitate survival in hostile infection environments.

7.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(1): 3-9, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33463411

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a screening questionnaire to identify high-risk patients for novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) among those undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between May 4th, 2020 and June 11th, 2020, a total of 1,021 consecutive patients (492 males, 529 females; mean age: 62.3±15.1 years; range, 13 to 91 years) who were scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery were included. A screening questionnaire was applied to all patients. The patients admitted to hospital were also tested for COVID-19 infection through reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of the nasopharyngeal swab. RESULTS: Of the patients, 1,003 (98.2%) underwent elective surgery as planned. The screening questionnaire classified 30 patients as high-risk for COVID-19. A total of 18 procedures (n=18, 1.8%) were postponed due to the high risk of possible transmission of COVID-19. None of 991 low-risk patients were tested positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The use of guiding principles for resuming elective orthopedic surgery is safe without a higher risk for complications in selected cases.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia/estadística & datos numéricos , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Electivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Hospitalización , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Transmisión de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Femenino , Alemania/epidemiología , Hospitales de Alto Volumen , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Estudios Retrospectivos , Medición de Riesgo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
8.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(1): 17-21, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33463413

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to investigate if the use of intravenous (IV) tranexamic acid (TXA) during one-stage exchange for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the hip that necessitates an extensive debridement is associated with decreased blood loss, if the rate of blood transfusion that may lead to side effects can be lowered with IV TXA, and if there is any difference regarding the occurrence of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent one-stage exchange for PJI of the hip with perioperative IV administration of TXA (n=163; 90 males, 73 females; mean age 68±10.3; range, 25 to 90 years) between January 2015 and December 2016 and compared them to another group (n=190; 106 males, 84 females; mean age 71±10.1; range, 39 to 92 years) who underwent one-stage exchange for PJI of the hip without perioperative IV administration of TXA between January 2006 and December 2012. Blood loss, transfusion rates, amount of transfused blood, and occurrence of VTE complications were observed. RESULTS: Mean blood loss of the TXA group was significantly lower than that of the non-TXA group (2.4 L and 4.5 L, respectively; p<0.001). Patients in non-TXA group experienced significantly higher rate of blood transfusion (71.1% and 58.3%, respectively; p=0.014) and higher quantity of transfused packed red blood cells (3.2 and 1.9 units, respectively; p<0.001). There was one patient with VTE complication in each group. CONCLUSION: Even in the presence of infection, usage of IV TXA during one-stage exchange for PJI of the hip is associated with significantly lower blood loss and transfusion rates showing no higher risk of VTE events.

9.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg ; 141(3): 517-525, 2021 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33388890

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The demand for total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is increasing worldwide with excellent long-term results. In general, TJA provides several benefits to the patients but also causes possible complications. The aim of our study was to describe trends in mortality after TJA in a high-volume arthroplasty center, and to examine the potential risk factors. METHODS: From 1996 to 2018, a total of 103,560 patients (73,130 primary cases, 30,430 revision cases) underwent a TJA procedure in our institution. Anthropometric parameters, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), pre- and postoperative hemoglobin (Hb), blood loss during surgery, postoperative complication (such as infection, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, etc.) and cause of death from all patients who deceased during hospitalization were collected. The short-term mortality rate was analyzed between the primary and the revision groups. RESULTS: The short-term mortality rate within our investigated groups was low with 0.041% in primary THA, 0.299% in revision THA, 0.045% in primary TKA, 0.205% in revision TKA, 0.214% in TSA/RSA, 0.15 % in primary TAA and 0% after TEA. Significant differences were found for preoperative Hb-values in patients undergoing septic revision (10.7 g/dl) compared to patients undergoing aseptic revision (12.8 g/dl) or primary arthroplasty (13.6 g/dl) (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we found significant differences regarding CCI between the groups. The comparison between causes of death (COD) showed a significantly higher number for pulmonary embolisms in the aseptic groups, while septic shock was the leading COD in the septic group and myocardial infarction as COD was found significantly more often after primary TJA. CONCLUSION: This is the largest single-center study presenting the short-term mortality rate following TJA. Consequently, TJA is a safe procedure with a low short-term mortality rate. However, depending on the type of surgery, certain risk factors cannot be eliminated. In order to further reduce the mortality, procedures as such should continue to be performed at specialized centers under standardized conditions.

10.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 103(6): 517-523, 2021 Mar 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33369984

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Successful results have been reported in association with the use of a rotating-hinge prosthesis for primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors for aseptic loosening in patients who underwent primary TKA with rotating-hinge knee prostheses. METHODS: The records of 1,235 patients who underwent primary TKA with a rotating-hinge prosthesis at our center were evaluated. A total of 125 patients who underwent revision were further evaluated according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 33 patients who underwent revision because of aseptic loosening were then compared with a group of 30 patients who did not require revision surgery. All data, including radiographic measurements, were obtained from records prior to the primary TKA. RESULTS: On the basis of our review of demographic, anthropometric, clinical, surgical, and radiographic findings, we found that higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with revision. The majority of patients with aseptic loosening had loosening of the femoral component. Furthermore, the inner femoral diameter at 20 cm proximal to the knee joint (on both anteroposterior and lateral images) was found to be predictive of revision among those with aseptic loosening. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that an inner diameter of the femur of >19 mm on anteroposterior images had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 87% for predicting the need for revision surgery in patients with aseptic loosening. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of few studies that has focused on determining risk factors for the failure of rotating-hinge prostheses following TKA surgery. Our findings indicate that a novel variable, the inner (diaphyseal) diameter of the femur at the point 20 cm proximal to the knee joint, is an extremely reliable predictor of revision surgery in patients with aseptic loosening. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

11.
Clin Orthop Surg ; 12(4): 464-469, 2020 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33274023

RESUMEN

Background: The use of hinged designs is usually reserved for severe deformities or instability in contemporary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Results have been mixed with some authors reporting relatively high incidences of complications. The aim of this study is to present the results of primary TKA performed with a hinged prosthesis with a minimum 10-year follow-up. We also examined the factors that influence survivorship of this prosthesis. Methods: A total of 238 primary TKA procedures were performed using hinged prostheses. Indications included osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, posttraumatic deformity, and arthritis. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Hospital for Special Surgery score. Radiologic assessment was performed at each follow-up. Survivorship was calculated based on the Kaplan-Meier method. All complications were documented. Results: Mean follow-up was 13.5 years (standard deviation [SD], 3.4). Mean flexion at final review was 118° (SD, 20°). Fifty-four percent and 20% reported excellent and good functional scores, respectively. Survivorship was 94% at 13.5 years in patients over 60 years of age and 77% in patients less than 60 years of age. Survivorship in patients with preoperative varus deformity was 96% and that in valgus knees was 79%. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that when rotating hinges are used for primary TKA, the best results are achieved in patients over 60 years old. The indications for this design in the setting of primary TKA include significant deformities, severe bone loss, and ligamentous laxity.

12.
Int Orthop ; 2020 Nov 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33188603

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the risk factors of aseptic loosening (AL) in complex revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) cases using rotating hinge knee prosthesis. METHODS: Patients who had undergone re-revision rotating hinge prosthesis surgery between January 2012 and December 2017 were included. Parameters related to AL were retrospectively reviewed. For this purpose, 31 aseptic loosening patients and 30 control patients were included in the study. Various risk factors were evaluated. Risk factors for AL after re-revision were determined using univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Thirty-one AL patients and 30 control patients were included. In the AL group, tibial tantalum cone and impaction grafting were performed significantly less frequently than the control group (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that smoking, right-sided TKA, and large femoral canal anteroposterior diameter were factors that increased the risk of AL after re-revision, while tibial tantalum cone decreased the risk of loosening. Smokers had an 11.847-fold higher risk for AL; right-sided TKA led to a 4.594-fold higher risk for AL. However, the presence of a tibial tantalum cone was associated with an 8.403-fold lower risk for AL. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that smoking, right-sided prosthesis, and large femoral canal diameter increased the risk of AL, while tantalum cone and impaction grafting reduced this risk in patients who underwent re-revision surgery with rotating hinge prosthesis after TKA.

13.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 15226, 2020 09 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32939007

RESUMEN

The successful use of allografts in reconstructive orthopedic surgery, including revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), has been outlined repeatedly. Nonetheless, as previous studies were primarily based on clinical follow-ups, we aimed to create an algorithm that accurately determines the extent of allograft incorporation in the acetabulum and femur using a suite of high-resolution imaging techniques. This study is based on a large patient database including > 4,500 patient data with previous revision THA and simultaneous use of allografts. While the database was continuously matched with the deceased individuals at the local forensic medicine department, complete hips were retrieved in case of a positive match. A positive match was achieved for n = 46 hips at a mean follow-up of 11.8 ± 5.1 years. Comprehensive imaging included contact radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HR-pQCT), undecalcified histology of ground sections and quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI). We here define a histomorphometric toolkit of parameters to precisely characterize the incorporation of structural (bulk) and morselized (chip) allografts in the acetabulum (n = 38) and femur (n = 8), including the defect area and interface length, microstructural and cellular bone turnover parameters as well as overlap and fibrosis thickness. This collection of samples, through its unique study design and precise definition of incorporation parameters, will provide the scientific community with a valuable source for further in-depth investigation of allograft incorporation and, beyond that, the regenerative potential of this osteoconductive scaffold.

14.
Hip Int ; 30(1_suppl): 72-77, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907419

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Identification of the pathogen in case of a periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains 1 of the greatest challenges in septic surgery. Rapid germ identification enables timely, specific, antimicrobial therapy. The first multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction) generation (Unyvero-i60) enables germ detection within 5 hours with a sensitivity of 78.8% and a specificity of 100%. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the new generation of cartridges (Unyvero-ITI) of multiplex PCR in the case of a PJI. METHODS: In a prospective study, intraoperatively aspirated synovial fluid from 97 patients with aseptic or septic hip or knee revision surgery (49 aseptic, 48 septic) was examined with the multiplex PCR system (Unyvero-ITI) and the results were compared with the MSIS criteria. In addition, the time until the microbiological result was obtained in the event of a germ detection was documented. RESULTS: The multiplex PCR showed a germ detection with a sensitivity of 85.1% and a specificity of 98.0%. In 7 cases a false negative result was found and in one patient a false positive result was found. The general accuracy of this test procedure was 91.8%. The detection of germs was carried out within 5 hours with the multiplex PCR compared to 4.9 days in conventional microbiological diagnostics. CONCLUSIONS: The new generation of multiplex-PCR was able to improve germ detection. The possibility of prompt detection of germs offers the option of faster, targeted antimicrobial therapy. This diagnostic tool offers significant advantages, particularly in the context of an acute periprosthetic infection.

15.
Hip Int ; 30(1_suppl): 19-25, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907422

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Controversies exist regarding the association of elevated serum glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) or prosthetic joint infection (PJI) in the setting of total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA). The purpose of the current study was to determine the prevalence of unknown and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus (DM) in a consecutive series and to investigate the association between postoperative wound complications or SSI/PJI and elevated HbA1c in patients undergoing TJA. METHODS: In this prospective single-centre study, HbA1c was determined for patients undergoing elective primary, aseptic or septic revision THA and TKA, between September 2017 and March 2018. Prevalence of DM, unknown and uncontrolled diabetes were reported. Occurrence of 90-day wound healing disorders (WHD) as well as SSI or PJI were observed. Considering the HbA1c threshold ⩾6.5%, a comparative analysis between patients with and without WHD and SSI or PJI for the whole study cohort, as well as for each arthroplasty group, was performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were developed to quantify the predictive power of HbA1c with regard to WHD and infection complications. A total of 1488 patients were included for final analysis. There were 1127 primary THA and TKA (75.7%), 272 aseptic revisions (18.3%) and 89 septic revisions (6.0%). The known diabetic patients constituted 9.9% of the whole study cohort. RESULTS: The majority had uncontrolled DM (67%). Prevalence of unknown DM was 11.1%. The results reveal the prevalence for the German population and might be different in other regions. A total of 57 patients (3.7%) experienced postoperative wound or infectious complications. PJI occurred in only 5 patients (0.03%). There was no significant difference between patients with HbA1c <6.5% and patients with HbA1c ⩾6.5% (p = 0.092). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that prevalence of unknown and uncontrolled DM in patients undergoing TJA is increasing, however; routine preoperative determination of the HbA1c value to prevent possible postoperative wound or infectious complications remains debatable. Larger studies investigating the optimal HbA1c level, as well as other predictors are required.

16.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(23): 2043-2048, 2020 Dec 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941311

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) in the early postoperative period remains a challenge. Although studies have established that serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and synovial markers may be useful, recent studies have suggested that the current thresholds used may lack sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of serum CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), synovial fluid white blood-cell (WBC) count, and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) percentage in the diagnosis of acute postoperative PJI and to identify the optimal threshold. METHODS: This multicenter study included patients who were investigated for possible PJI within 90 days of an index arthroplasty. This study included 197 patients from 4 institutions who underwent total joint arthroplasty from 2000 to 2017. Of these patients, 123 were confirmed to have PJI, and 74 were ruled out as not having PJI (non-infected group). Analyses of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the curve were performed to determine the value of each test and optimal cutoff values. RESULTS: The optimal cutoff value was 6,130 cells/µL for synovial fluid WBC count (91% sensitivity and 83% specificity), 39.8 mg/L for serum CRP (91% sensitivity and 87% specificity), 39.5 mm/hr for ESR (76% sensitivity and 67% specificity), and 79.5% for PMN percentage (95% sensitivity and 59% specificity). Reducing the acute period from 90 days to 30 days or 45 days made little difference in most threshold values. However, the optimal cutoff for synovial fluid WBC count was almost twice as high (10,170 cells/µL) when using a 30-day definition instead of a 90-day definition. CONCLUSIONS: The calculated cutoffs in our study were substantially lower than the thresholds used by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. The calculated values of this study should be used, as previous cutoffs may be too high and lack sensitivity. In addition, it appears that the threshold values, at least for some of the tests, change as the duration since the index arthroplasty lengthens. A continuum of threshold values that is dependent on the number of days since the index arthroplasty may need to be used for the diagnosis of acute PJI. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Diagnostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

17.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 31(3): 419-425, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32962570

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to investigate the use of multiple blood management strategies and the effect of tourniquet on the estimated blood loss (EBL) in Jehovah's Witness (JW) patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-two self-reported JW patients (9 males, 13 females; mean age 66.8±8.6 years; range, 51 to 83 years) who underwent primary TKA between January 2014 and January 2020 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. A standard blood management protocol that consisted of hypotensive anesthesia, local and systemic administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) and intraoperative cell salvage was applied to all patients. Patients were divided into two groups: with (n=11) and without (n=11) tourniquet use. The EBL was calculated according to Meunier's formula. Hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), and EBL on the first and third postoperative days were compared statistically. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between groups regarding postoperative Hgb (p=0.801 and p=0.767), Hct (p=0.617 and p=0.895), Hgb decline (p=0.311 and p=0.822), and EBL (p=0.067 and p=0.284) at first and third postoperative days. None of the patients required blood transfusion. No wound complication or symptomatic deep vein thrombosis was seen during the hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Combined use of hypotensive anesthesia, intravenous administration of TXA, intraoperative periarticular injection, and cell salvage seem to be sufficient in controlling the blood loss in JW patients during TKA. Additional tourniquet use may not further decrease the EBL.

19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32898046

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Dual-mobility cups have been shown to reduce the dislocation risk after THA. Although dual-mobility cups can be a useful strategy to mitigate against recurrent dislocation after revision surgery, few clinical studies have focused on the results of complex revision THAs with extensive bone and soft-tissue loss or in patients who have undergone more than one previous surgical procedure. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) What is the survival free from revision for dislocation of dual-mobility cups used in complex revision THAs? (2) What is the survival free from any dislocation? METHODS: Between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013, 327 patients underwent a complex revision THA that included an acetabular revision, defined as preexisting massive bone loss in the acetabulum (at least Paprosky Type 2B) and/or proximal femur (at least Paprosky Type 3), substantial gluteal soft-tissue involvement, at least two previous surgical procedures or a one-stage septic revision, or history of dislocation. All 327 complex revision patients received a dual-mobility cup. Of those, 34% (111) were lost to follow-up before 5 years and were not known to have reached a study endpoint (revision for dislocation, and any dislocation) before then, leaving 216 patients for analysis. For patients with bilateral hip surgeries only the first operated hip was included for analysis. The median (range) follow-up duration was 69 months (60 to 110). The primary endpoint was dislocation or re-revision for dislocation. Fifty-six percent (120 of 216) of the patients were women and 44% (96 of 216) were men. The mean age of the patients was 69 ± 9 years. The patients underwent a median of four surgical procedures (1 to 4) before the index procedure (the revision evaluated in this study). A survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method; any dislocation or revision for dislocation was determined as the endpoint. RESULTS: The dislocation-free survival rates were 96% (95% confidence interval 92 to 98) at 5 years and 82% (95% CI 72 to 89) at 9 years. The overall dislocation rate was 11% (24 of 216 patients) at the final follow-up interval. Survival free of revision for dislocation was 99% (95% CI 96 to 100) at 5 years and 85% (95% CI 75 to 92) at 9 years. CONCLUSIONS: Dual-mobility cups used in complex revision THA in this series had a higher rate of dislocation and revision than expected, based on earlier studies of dislocations of these components. Although we believe dual-mobility cups are still the first choice of implant if the patient has instability, these cups should be used cautiously if severe bone loss or soft-tissue involvement is present. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, therapeutic study.

20.
J Arthroplasty ; 2020 Aug 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32863076

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A wide range of success rates following the surgical management of enterococcal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) with a tendency toward worse outcomes have been reported. However, the role of 1-stage exchange remains under-investigated. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate our results after the 1-stage knee exchange for enterococcal PJI. METHODS: Forty patients were retrospectively included between 2002 and 2017 with a mean follow-up of survivors of 80 months (range 22-172; standard deviation [SD] = 5). Polymicrobial infections occurred in 45% (18/40) of patients. Patients' characteristics, joint-related data, and antibiotic therapy were recorded. Rates of enterococcal infection relapse, reinfection with new microorganisms, and re-revision for any reason were determined. Bivariate analysis was conducted to identify risk factors of infection recurrence. RESULTS: Revision surgery was required in 22 cases (55%) with a mean time to revision surgery of 27 months (range 1-78; SD = 25). Indications for aseptic revisions (18%) included aseptic loosening (10%), periprosthetic fracture (5%), and patellar instability (3%). The most common cause of re-revision was a subsequent PJI (15/22; 68%) after a mean time of 22 months (range 1-77; SD = 24). Overall infection recurrence rate was 37.5% (15/40), substantially due to entirely non-enterococcal infections (9/15; 60%). Infection relapse with Enterococci occurred in 4 cases (10%) within 16 months postoperatively. Older patients (P = .05) and male gender (P = .05) were associated with a higher risk of infection recurrence. CONCLUSION: Overcoming the Enterococci using the 1-stage exchange for knee PJI is achievable but the rate of reinfection due to new microorganisms is high . However, the overall infection recurrence rate is comparable to other treatment approaches.

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