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1.
MEDICC Rev ; 2021 Aug 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34653117

RESUMEN

Soaring summer temperatures, systematic urban and political violence, unreliable infrastructure-power outages, water shortages, sporadic transportation and interruption of other basic services-plus the illness, death and economic straits wrought by COVID-19, are what Haitians awake to every day. On the morning of August 14, 2021, they also woke to the earth in the throes of violent, lethal convulsions caused by a 7.2-magnitude earthquake, along the same fault line responsible for the devastating 2010 disaster and stronger still. As if this weren't enough, Tropical Storm Grace was bearing down on the nation, about to dump biblical amounts of rain on the heels of Tropical Storm Fred. When the Haitian President was assassinated on July 7, Haiti still had not received a single dose of any COVID-19 vaccine-indeed, it was the last country in the Americas to receive vaccines. Later that month, 500,000 doses arrived in the country, donated by the United States via COVAX, the WHO-led initiative to assure at least some vaccines reached low- and middle-income countries. In Haiti, getting those vaccines into the arms of the population is beset by cold chain, distribution and bureaucratic problems, and compounded by widespread vaccine hesitancy; when the earthquake struck, only 14,074 of those doses had been administered.[1,2] Suddenly there was a new, more urgent tragedy, the earthquake leaving thousands of dead, injured and displaced-perhaps hundreds of thousands once the real tally emerges. As in the 2010 quake, the doctors, nurses and technicians comprising Cuba's medical team in Haiti-a commitment Cuba has maintained with its Caribbean neighbor since 1998-were among the first responders. The 2010 relief effort included an additional 1500 health professionals and specialists from Cuba's Henry Reeve Emergency Medical Contingent. Just 24 hours after the August 14th quake, MEDICC Review spoke by phone with Dr Luis Orlando Oliveros-Serrano in Port-au-Prince, where he coordinates Cuba's medical team in Haiti. His disaster response experience had already taken him to Haiti twice before and to Pakistan, Bolivia and beyond.

2.
MEDICC Rev ; 23(3-4): 9-14, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34516531

RESUMEN

At the time of this writing, more than 10 million Cubans (nearly 90% of the country's population), had received at least their first dose of Soberana 02 or Abdala, two of five vaccine candidates for SARS-CoV-2 developed and produced on the island. Late-phase clinical trial data revealed that Abdala is 92.28% effective after the full, three-dose cycle and Soberana 02 is 91.2% effective after two doses, when followed by a booster of Soberana Plus.[1] Cuban health authorities have committed to vaccinating the entire population, including children aged 3-18 years old, using these vaccines by the end of 2021. The first pre-clinical, peer-reviewed data are available,[2] with clinical trial results already submitted to various international journals. Building on decades of biotechnology know-how developing, producing and administering 11 preventive vaccines for childhood diseases-used in the nation's universal health system and also marketed elsewhere-Cuba is the first, and to date only, country in Latin America and the Caribbean to develop its own vaccine candidates for COVID-19 (Soberana 01; Soberana 02; Soberana Plus; Abdala and Mambisa; see Box on following page). In a strategy designed to ensure comprehensive and importantly, independent solutions to the global health crisis, research institutes and manufacturing facilities coordinated by BioCubaFarma-the country's biopharmaceutical conglomerate-have also developed COVID-19 treatments and essential medical equipment. To gain a better understanding of the regulatory process involved, MEDICC Review turned to Olga Lidia Jacobo-Casanueva, Director of the Center for State Control of Medicines and Medical Devices (CECMED), Cuba's national regulatory authority (NRA). A clinical microbiologist, Jacobo-Casanueva served as interim director throughout 2020 before becoming director in January 2021. She has spent nearly her entire career at CECMED, working her way up the ranks in a unique trajectory: from her first position in 1992 in the Center's microbiology laboratories, she has since worked in all but one of the six areas required by WHO to qualify as a National Regulatory Authority of Reference (NRAr; CECMED was certified as a Level 4 NRAr in 2011, a qualification it maintains). In short, Jacobo-Casanueva is a regulatory polymath, with hands-on experience in nearly every facet of regulation. She is also an adjunct researcher in the Faculty of Biology at the University of Havana. Cuba's decision to confront the pandemic autonomously by developing preventive vaccines to control COVID-19 is deliberate and fraught with challenges. With dozens of ongoing clinical trials, coupled with the declining epidemiological and economic situation in Cuba-exacerbated by tightened US sanctions affecting all facets of COVID-19 prevention and response-we appreciate the time Jacobo-Casanueva took from her schedule to parse the complex regulatory mechanisms required to introduce Cuban and imported products into the national health system. Editor's note: Just days after this interview was conducted in Havana, CECMED granted Emergency Use Authorization for Abdala, one of five Cuban COVID-19 vaccine candidates undergoing clinical trials since 2020.

3.
MEDICC Rev ; 23(2): 9, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33974607

RESUMEN

The effects and implications of COVID-19 are global, comprehensive and long-term. The pandemic has exposed inequities, the fragility of economic and political systems, and in many cases, skewed priorities. Population health, not to mention planetary health, is suffering as a result. Nevertheless, the global health crisis in which we are embroiled has provided opportunities for effective collaboration, scientific innovation and real dialog around health and equity. Dr Amaylid Arteaga-García, director of Cuba's National Clinical Trials Coordinating Center (CENCEC), emphasized these opportunities when discussing Cuba's clinical trials in times of COVID-19. Founded in 1991 in response to the groundbreaking research emerging from the country's biopharmaceutical sector-including the first safe, effective vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease, VA-MENGOC-BC in 1989 and a recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B, Heberbiovac in 1990-CENCEC now coordinates some 100 clinical trials annually, many of them multi-site trials involving thousands of volunteers. Little did Dr Arteaga García know what problems lurked when she became CENCEC director in 2019. In February 2020, Cuba implemented its National COVID-19 Prevention & Control Plan. This included a scientific Innovation Committee tasked with evaluating promising projects, products and research that might be used in the health system to control and treat COVID-19. This approach taps into two of Cuba's strengths: biotechnology and primary health care. Given the volume and complexity of COVID-19 clinical trials, Dr Arteaga.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/prevención & control , Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/organización & administración , Cuba/epidemiología , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
4.
MEDICC Rev ; 23(2): 12, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33974610

RESUMEN

Cuba has five COVID-19 vaccines in clinical trials and is on track to receive emergency use authorization from the country's regulatory agency to begin mass vaccination with two of those candidates: Abdala and SOBERANA 02. Results from phase 1 and 2 trials of these vaccines, the first developed and produced in Latin America, have been encouraging, both in terms of safety and immunogenicity. The ongoing phase 3 trials will continue to look at safety, together with efficacy; parallel intervention studies involving over a million people in Havana will begin generating data on effectiveness. Coordination between Cuba's biotechnology sector and its public health system-particularly throughout the different levels of primary care-to control and treat COVID-19 is a cornerstone of the Cuban strategy and one that could serve as a blueprint for future pandemics. Another Cuban product, itolizumab, is showing positive results mitigating cytokine release syndrome (CRS) in COVID-19 patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Developed in collaboration with Biocon (India), itolizumab is administered under an expanded access program to treat vulnerable populations in Cuba. Marshaling complementary capacities of dozens of institutions belonging to BioCubaFarma-the country's biotech conglomerate-and developing therapies, vaccines and medical technologies together, is another cornerstone of Cuba's strategy to combat COVID-19 and improve population health. The Molecular Immunology Center (CIM) is a key player in this strategy. Founded in 1992, CIM is a powerhouse in monoclonal antibody research and production, with 6 registered products and 22 in the pipeline. Known for several novel therapeutic cancer treatments, CIM has over two decades' experience producing complex recombinant proteins in mammalian cells on an industrial scale. Once Cuba's Innovation Committee (convened in January 2020 as part of the National COVID-19 Prevention & Control Plan) determined Cuban researchers would pursue protein subunit vaccine candidates, they turned to CIM to produce the required receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, among other responsibilities. CIM's General Director, Dr Eduardo Ojito-Magaz, is a chemical engineer and holds a master's degree in biotechnology. He spoke with MEDICC Review just days before 1.7 million Havana residents began participating in the country's largest intervention study with the COVID-19 vaccines his center helped make possible.


Asunto(s)
Anticuerpos Monoclonales Humanizados/uso terapéutico , Vacunas contra la COVID-19/administración & dosificación , COVID-19/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Anticuerpos Monoclonales , Investigación Biomédica , Biotecnología , COVID-19/epidemiología , Cuba/epidemiología , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/virología , SARS-CoV-2
5.
MEDICC Rev ; 23(1): 18-20, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33780418

RESUMEN

On March 23, 2020, Cuba's Henry Reeve Emergency Medical Contingent began treating COVID-19 patients at Maggiore Hospital in Crema, Lombardy. Within days, the 52-member contingent comprised of 36 doctors and 15 nurses (plus 1 logistics specialist), together with Italian colleagues, were receiving patients in an adjacent fi eld hospital established and equipped for this purpose. At the time, Lombardy was the epicenter of COVID-19 transmission in Europe. Many of the Cubans in Lombardy were Contingent veterans, having served in postdisaster and epidemic scenarios in Chile, Pakistan, Haiti and elsewhere since the founding of the emergency medical team in 2005. Importantly, some had worked fi ghting the 2014 Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Even so, providing medical care during COVID-19 is a unique challenge, the likes of which had never before been seen by the Cuban team. Dr Carlos R. Pérez-Díaz, one of the Contingent's founding members, headed the team during its 60-day rotation in Lombardy, drawing on a wide array of professional experience. From 2006 to 2009, Dr Pérez-Díaz led the Cuban team posted at the Peltier Hospital in Djibouti, where he worked in the infectious disease department; in 2008, this team helped control a cholera outbreak that had spread to three countries. Following the 2010 earthquake in Chile, Dr Pérez-Díaz headed the team of Henry Reeve volunteers that provided free health services for 10 months in a tent hospital established to treat victims; he returned to Chile in 2015, again as head of the Henry Reeve Contingent, after severe fl ooding struck the Atacama region.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/terapia , Misiones Médicas , Neumonía Viral/terapia , COVID-19/epidemiología , Cuba , Femenino , Humanos , Italia/epidemiología , Masculino , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , SARS-CoV-2
6.
MEDICC Rev ; 22(4): 10-15, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33295312

RESUMEN

On August 13, 2020, Cuba's national regulatory agency, the Center for Quality Control of Medicines, Equipment and Medical Devices (CECMED), authorized clinical trials for SOBERANA 01-Cuba's fi rst vaccine candidate and the fi rst from Latin America and the Caribbean. On August 24, parallel Phase I/II double blind, randomized, controlled clinical trials were launched at clinical sites in Havana to evaluate the vaccine's safety and immunogenicity. Analysis of results and development of different formulations are currently under way and Phase III clinical trials are planned for early 2021. At the time of writing, a second vaccine candidate, SOBERANA 02, was in late-stage development and preparing to begin separate trials this fall.


Asunto(s)
Vacunas contra la COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevención & control , COVID-19/epidemiología , Cuba/epidemiología , Método Doble Ciego , Humanos , Pandemias , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , SARS-CoV-2
7.
MEDICC Rev ; 22(4): 16-19, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33295313

RESUMEN

Virologist Dr María Guadalupe Guzmán is recognized as a global leader in dengue research and heads the Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute's work as a WHO/PAHO Collaborating Center for the Study of Dengue and Its Vector. The Institute (IPK) was founded in 1937 and is now Cuba's national reference center for the diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention of communicable diseases. Dr Guzmán is also president of the Cuban Society of Microbiology and Parasitology and directs IPK's Scientifi c Council, which is responsible for setting the Institute's research priorities. A recent h-index analysis found that Dr Guzmán is among the most widelypublished and cited Cuban researchers.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Investigación , Academias e Institutos , COVID-19/epidemiología , Cuba/epidemiología , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
8.
MEDICC Rev ; 22(3): 12-15, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32812893

RESUMEN

Science journalism was little known in Cuba when Iramis Alonso wrote her the-sis on the specialized fi eld in 1990. That year, journalism degree from the Uni-versity of Havana in hand, she set off to Cuba's eastern countryside to complete two years of social service reporting for local, regional and national print media. Living in the mountains of Holguín, a typical day for the cub reporter took her to caves, forests and fi elds for stories on the intersection of science, culture and the environment. Alonso credits this formative experience with igniting her passion for investigative and sci-ence journalism, setting her on a unique career path as a journalist and editor specializing in the sciences writ large: climate change, astronomy, mathemat-ics and other hard sciences, engineer-ing, information technologies and social sciences, among others.

9.
MEDICC Rev ; 22(2): 58-63, 2020 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32478711

RESUMEN

Meningitis, neuropathy, HIV, dengue-since the 1960s, Cuba has faced its share of epidemics. More recently, Cuban health pro-fessionals tackled domestic outbreaks of H1N1 (2009) and Zika (2016), and worked alongside colleagues from around the world to stem Ebola in West Africa; all three were categorized by WHO as public health emergencies of international concern. In December 2019, China reported its fi rst cluster of pneumo-nia cases, later identifi ed as the novel coronavirus disease COVID-19. In January 2020, Cuban authorities convened a multi-sector working group coordinated by the Ministry of Pub-lic Health (MINSAP) and Civil Defense to tailor its national epi-demic control plan to confront the rapidly-spreading disease. The plan features a national reporting system and database, with standard protocols including early case detection, contact tracing and regularly-scheduled public health messaging. In late January, no fewer than six ministries, plus the National Sports and Recreation Institute, Customs, Immigration and national media outlets, came together to adapt domestic proto-cols and design multi-phase control and response mechanisms to combat the SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus/aislamiento & purificación , Infecciones por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Tamizaje Masivo/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/diagnóstico , COVID-19 , Cuba , Humanos , Almacenamiento y Recuperación de la Información , Pandemias , Salud Pública , SARS-CoV-2
10.
MEDICC Rev ; 22(2): 64-66, 2020 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32478712

RESUMEN

The days are long and arduous, with end-less patients to attend, often in a foreign language, always on foreign shores. Far from family and the familiar. Sleep is fi tful at best for health profession-als serving in emergency situations-when sickness obeys no clock and patients' pain haunts even the quiet moments. The crisis scenario varies: post-earthquake, hurricane or tsunami; amid a cholera or Ebola epidemic. The countries vary: Haiti, Pakistan, Guatemala, Mozambique, Sierra Leone. What does not vary is the answer to the calls for help and Cuban professionals' commitment to care for the most vulner-able. These aren't armchair musings or a political pat on the back: they are my own conclusions after living for weeks in close-quarter tents with Cuban doctors, nurses and biomedical engineers in post-earth-quake Pakistan and Haiti, and witnessing their work.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Medicina de Emergencia , Cooperación Internacional , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , COVID-19 , Cuba , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Recursos Humanos
11.
MEDICC Rev ; 21(2-3): 6-9, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31373578

RESUMEN

How does a developing island nation, beleaguered by climatic challenges and 60 years of adverse geo-political pressures become a beacon of scientific innovation, medical services and applied research-all on a shoestring budget? What's more, how does such a country, rooted in a traditional patriarchal paradigm, overcome barriers to create a scientific and medical community where the majority of researchers and professionals are women? These are some of the questions that motivated MEDICC Review to publish this series on Cuba's women in STEM (science, technology and math).


Asunto(s)
Antropología , Racismo , Sexismo , Academias e Institutos , Cuba , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Cambio Social
12.
MEDICC Rev ; 21(1): 6-9, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31242145

RESUMEN

The 1980s were a watershed for Cuban research in medicine and health: significant financing and material resources buttressed a strategy to improve population health through enhanced biopharmaceutical innovation and clinical best practices applied to Cuba's universal public health system. Redirecting research priorities and providing substantial public funding to tackle the top population health problems was a radical idea at the time, especially for a developing country like Cuba. Doing so has become a hallmark of Cuba's scientific achievements and approach ever since. Among the institutions exemplifying this strategy is the Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute (IPK). Founded in 1937 with a research mission dedicated to parasitology and transmission of known tropical diseases, it wasn't until the late Dr Gustavo Kourí Flores was appointed director in 1979 that IPK's core objectives and facilities were expanded to include a comprehensive teaching component, a state-of-the-art clinical hospital to treat tropical and other communicable diseases, and an international collaboration strategy to facilitate knowledge and technology transfer.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Arbovirus/prevención & control , Arbovirus , Academias e Institutos , Cuba , Dengue/prevención & control , Humanos , Medicina Tropical , Infección por el Virus Zika/prevención & control
13.
MEDICC Rev ; 21(1): 14-15, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31242147

RESUMEN

Art, education, health and nutrition: encouraging healthy eating at an early age is central to the World Food Programme's (WFP) goals. To this end, using art as a learning and communications tool, the program sponsors WFP in Action, a drawing contest open to youngsters 5-18 years old. Cuba has participated in the contest nationally since the 1990s, and since 2002 has sent a selection of drawings annually to the international competition at WFP headquarters in Rome.


Asunto(s)
Arte , Dieta Saludable , Promoción de la Salud , Adolescente , Niño , Preescolar , Cuba , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos
14.
MEDICC Rev ; 21(4): 83-92, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32335576

RESUMEN

In 1978, the world was put on notice: health inequalities exacerbated by lack of access to essential services was a ticking time bomb threatening social and economic development everywhere. That year, over 100 countries signed on to the Declaration of Alma-Ata, which affirmed that "health . . . a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, is a fundamental human right." To guarantee this right, governments were urged to prioritize the provision of quality, continuous, comprehensive and affordable primary care for their entire populations by the year 2000.


Asunto(s)
Salud Global/historia , Cooperación Internacional , Cuba , Países en Desarrollo , Política de Salud , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Atención Primaria de Salud
15.
MEDICC Rev ; 20(2): 11-16, 2018 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29773770

RESUMEN

On the 40th anniversary of the Alma Ata Declaration that affirmed health for all a right and primary health care the route to guarantee that right, WHO and PAHO have issued a call to action to convert universal health into reality for the nearly four billion people worldwide lacking full coverage of essential health services. There is some urgency to this movement: WHO estimates the health workforce shortage of nearly 8 million could reach almost 13 million by 2035. And the USA is not exempt: medical associations and special commissions set up to investigate the shortage of primary care physicians, especially "under-represented minority" doctors, have issued report after report on this growing health care emergency. The biggest question looming is: where will the health care providers come from, especially well-trained primary care doctors who want to work for those who need them most?


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Médicos , Atención Primaria de Salud , Facultades de Medicina , Cuba , Femenino , Humanos , América Latina , Masculino , Estados Unidos
16.
MEDICC Rev ; 20(3): 6-9, 2018 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31242155

RESUMEN

After nearly 60 years of universal education and health, coupled with national policies supporting women's rights and advancement, the results are in: according to recent data, more than half of Cuban scientists and almost 60% of all professionals in Cuba are women. Moreover, women's representation in government is rising, including at the highest levels such as parliament, where they constitute 53.2% of members. Digging deeper, we find a story richer than national statistics or political representation. It's the story of the collective achievements of female professionals on the island. For example, the clinical research team responsible for developing CIMAvax-EGF, Cuba's novel biotech therapy for non-small cell lung cancer, was headed by a woman. Likewise, the lead scientist of the Cuban team that developed the world's first effective meningitis B vaccine is a woman. And the cofounder of the country's clinical trials coordinating center and registry is a woman, as is the founder of the National Center for Agricultural Animal Health. Yet, as in any country, there is more to be done to achieve true gender parity and release the full potential of women. To begin our series profiling outstanding Cuban women professionals, MEDICC Review spoke with sociologist Dr Marta Núñez, who has devoted decades to research on gender relations and the role of women in Cuba. She provides an overview and framework for contextualizing the advancement of Cuban women-including the challenges still to overcome.


Asunto(s)
Empoderamiento , Mujeres , Cuba , Femenino , Identidad de Género , Humanos , Mujeres/educación
17.
MEDICC Rev ; 20(4): 6-9, 2018 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31242165

RESUMEN

Throughout the 1980s, Cuban researchers at the country's biotech campus known as the Scientific Pole were making innovative discoveries and began developing unique therapies and vaccines unavailable elsewhere in the world. The pace and level of innovation meant prioritizing the establishment of a dedicated, internationally-certified institute for clinical trials. These and other accomplishments in science and related sectors, coupled with statistics revealing that 53% of all scientists in Cuba are women, prompted MEDICC Review to publish a series of interviews with outstanding Cuban women in science, technology and medicine.


Asunto(s)
Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto/organización & administración , Investigación Biomédica/organización & administración , Bioestadística , Selección de Profesión , Cuba , Identidad de Género , Humanos , Sistema de Registros , Mujeres
18.
MEDICC Rev ; 20(1): 8, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34229415

RESUMEN

Cuba's nascent biotechnology sector began making scientific breakthroughs in the 1980s, including the isolation of human leukocyte interferon alpha (1981) and the development of the world's first safe, effective meningitis BC vaccine (1989). With positive results in hand and a growing R&D pipeline, the island nation established a national regulatory authority (NRA) to implement and oversee best practices for all pharmaceuticals and medical devices, domestically produced and imported, used in the country's universal health system. Founded in 1989, Cuba's Center for State Control of Medicines and Medical Devices (CECMED) is the entity charged with regulating all phases of scientific innovation for health, from clinical trial design to postmarketing surveillance. Dr Rafael Pérez Cristiá, Distinguished Member of the Cuban Academy of Sciences, has been Director General of CECMED since 2000, overseeing regulation and control of unique and innovative biotechnology products and the concomitant evolution of the nation's regulatory authority. Under his guidance, CECMED has regulated unique therapies, vaccines, and pharmaceutical products-some unavailable anywhere else in the world-aimed at improving population health both at home and abroad. Recognized internationally as one of the top 20 countries with a safe and reliable biotechnology industry and regulatory authority, Cuba is having a measurable impact on public health. In this exclusive interview, Dr Pérez Cristiá, explains how a small, resource-scarce country has rocketed into the global biotech elite-and how it intends to stay there.

19.
MEDICC Rev ; 20(1): 42, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34229421

RESUMEN

In this Retrospective, MEDICC Review reprints excerpts from a blog by Senior Editor Conner Gorry, who, during February and March 2010, was embedded in the disaster-response medical team sent from Cuba after the January 12 earthquake. The team reinforced nearly 500 Cuban health personnel already on the ground long term in 120 communities. Some 700 of the 1300 new arrivals were students or graduates of Cuba's Latin American School of Medicine from 27 countries. Haitian graduates now number 1044. The international contingent (named after Henry Reeve, a Brooklyn-born general in Cuba's own independence struggle) became the largest medical relief effort assembled after the quake.

20.
MEDICC Rev ; 19(1): 6-9, 2017 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28225539

RESUMEN

Nurse Sarait Guarat has Felipe's clinical history out of the file cabinet and on Dr Martha Diaz's desk before he's even through the door. Not that Dr Díaz needs it: Having served 26 years at Consultorio (Family Doctor-and-Nurse Office) #17 on a leafy street in Havana's Vedado neighborhood, she knows each of her patients by name and their health status essentially by heart. After greeting 91-year old Felipe with the customary kiss on the cheek, Dr Díaz gets down to business, asking after his family, checking up on his diabetes and inquiring about the reason for his visit. "He's had an upset stomach and some diarrhea, doctora," his wife says from across the room. "That's not good. Let's find out what's going on," responds Dr Díaz, glancing at Felipe with a smile while donning her stethoscope to listen to his heart. After Felipe is weighed by Sarait, a nurse with 25 years' experience in Cuban primary care, Dr Díaz takes his blood pressure and commends him for his healthy 110/70.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/organización & administración , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/métodos , Cuba , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Modelos Organizacionales , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración
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