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1.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 377-384, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176338

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of a live-video teaching tool on the performance of dental students in bending an orthodontic vestibular arch and to assess the students' perceptions of the technology. All 135 fourth-year dental students in the 2018 academic year at Hacettepe Dental School, Ankara, Turkey, were invited to participate in the study; after exclusions, the remaining 116 were randomly divided into two demonstration cohorts. These students had no prior experience bending an orthodontic wire. Cohort 1 (control, N=58) was shown a conventional live demonstration of the orthodontic bending of a vestibular arch, and Cohort 2 (experimental, N=58) was shown a live-video demonstration of the same procedure. Both cohorts saw the demonstration before beginning the exercise and were evaluated afterwards on their performance of the procedure. In addition, the students' perceptions of the demonstration techniques were collected with a questionnaire. The results did not show any significant differences in the students' bending scores between the control and experimental cohorts (p=0.767). The median values on the questionnaire indicated almost no statistically significant difference in responses between the cohorts. The only significant difference was that Cohort 1 had a higher percentage who answered "yes" they would like to rewatch the demonstration than did Cohort 2 (p=0.024). In this study, the live-video technique was found to be as effective as a conventional live demonstration for orthodontic practical education, suggesting that either technique could be used as an appropriate method for training in orthodontic wire bending.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Alambres para Ortodoncia , Estudiantes de Odontología , Estudios de Cohortes , Humanos , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Grabación en Video
2.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 44-50, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977097

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of live-video and video demonstration methods in training dental students in orthodontic emergency applications. A total of 105 fifth-year dental students at a dental school in Turkey participated in the study in 2018. A pretest was given to the students to evaluate their level of knowledge about band cementing and re-bonding of brackets. Subsequently, two clinical applications were demonstrated with either live-video or video demonstration. During the live-video demonstration, the lecturer gave information about the steps of the procedure while performing the clinical application on the patient using a camera attached to the loupes. The students were able to see the process on the screens. During the video demonstration, previously recorded videos of those clinical applications were shown, and information was given to students in a classroom. On the next day, posttests were given to the students. The posttest also asked students to give their opinions about both methods. The results showed that the mean posttest scores on the video demonstration were significantly higher than on the live-video demonstration. However, no significant difference between the demonstration methods was found with regard to increase of scores from pre- to posttest. Most students preferred use of the two demonstrations together for education in the clinical orthodontics lecture. This study found that the two demonstration methods had comparable effects on increasing students' level of knowledge. However, from the students' perspective, the two should be used together to achieve the highest effect.


Asunto(s)
Ortodoncia , Educación en Odontología , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Grabación en Video
3.
Cleft Palate Craniofac J ; 57(3): 364-370, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31529989

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with and without cleft lip and/or palate using a previously validated questionnaire and to examine the clinical and demographic variables that may lead to increased OSA risk. DESIGN: Prospective, cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fifty-five cleft lip palate and 155 noncleft children between 2 and 18 years old. INTERVENTIONS: The Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ): Sleep Related Breathing Disorder Scale was used for screening of increased OSA risk. Age, body mass index (BMI), gender, breast-feeding, and bottle-feeding durations were recorded for all patients. Cleft type, lip and palate operation times, nasoalveolar molding, or nutrition plaque usage was documented for the cleft lip palate group. Pearson χ2 or Fisher exact test was used for the evaluation of the qualitative variables and independent samples t test or Mann Whitney U test for quantitative variables. P < .05 was accepted as statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean ages were 7.52 ± 3.91 and 7.50 ± 3.89 years for cleft lip palate and control groups, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups for age, gender, or BMI. Breast-feeding duration was significantly higher, and bottle-feeding duration was lower in the control group (P < .05). Mean PSQ score was significantly higher in cleft lip palate group (0.18 ± 0.12) than in control group (0.13 ± 0.1, P < .001); and prevalence of increased OSA risk was significantly higher in patients with both cleft lip and palate (P = .020). CONCLUSIONS: Positive OSA screening ratio of children with cleft lip and palate (12.2%) was significantly higher than the controls (4.5%).

4.
Prog Orthod ; 20(1): 46, 2019 Dec 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31840204

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: To compare the clinical efficiency of premium heat-activated copper nickel-titanium (Tanzo Cu-NiTi) and NT3 superelastic NiTi during initial orthodontic alignment. SUBJECT AND METHODS: A total of 50 patients were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 different archwire types (group 1, Tanzo Cu-NiTi; group 2, NT3 superelastic NiTi). Eligibility criteria included Class I or Class II malocclusion, moderate maxillary anterior crowding, and healthy periodontal condition. Impressions of the upper arches were taken before archwire placement (T0) and at every 4 weeks (T1, T2, T3, and T4). For T1 and T2 stages, 0.014-in., and for T3 and T4 stages, 0.018-in. archwires were used. The primary outcome was the alignment efficiency assessed using Little's irregularity index. The secondary outcomes were arch width and incisor inclination changes. Data were analyzed using independent samples t test, repeated measures ANOVA, and Mann-Whitney U test. Marginal models were established for the estimation of coefficients. RESULTS: The anterior irregularity index reduction was mostly observed between T0 and T2 periods, which were respectively - 7.40 ± 0.50 mm (p < 0.001; 95% CI, - 8.94, - 5.85) and - 6.80 ± 0.55 mm (p < 0.001; 95% CI, - 8.49, - 5.12) for groups 1 and 2 (p < 0.001). With both wires, Little's irregularity index decreased over time, and the difference between the groups was not significant (p = 0.581; estimated effect size, 0.011). No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in terms of intercanine and intermolar width and incisor inclination changes. CONCLUSION: There were no significant between-group differences in alignment efficiency, arch width, and incisor inclination change. There was an increased alignment with 0.014-in. compared with 0.018-in. diameter archwire.


Asunto(s)
Níquel , Titanio , Adolescente , Cobre , Aleaciones Dentales , Calor , Humanos , Alambres para Ortodoncia
5.
J Dent Educ ; 2019 Nov 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31712264

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of a live-video teaching tool on the performance of dental students in bending an orthodontic vestibular arch and to assess the students' perceptions of the technology. All 135 fourth-year dental students in the 2018 academic year at Hacettepe Dental School, Ankara, Turkey, were invited to participate in the study; after exclusions, the remaining 116 were randomly divided into two demonstration cohorts. These students had no prior experience bending an orthodontic wire. Cohort 1 (control, N=58) was shown a conventional live demonstration of the orthodontic bending of a vestibular arch, and Cohort 2 (experimental, N=58) was shown a live-video demonstration of the same procedure. Both cohorts saw the demonstration before beginning the exercise and were evaluated afterwards on their performance of the procedure. In addition, the students' perceptions of the demonstration techniques were collected with a questionnaire. The results did not show any significant differences in the students' bending scores between the control and experimental cohorts (p=0.767). The median values on the questionnaire indicated almost no statistically significant difference in responses between the cohorts. The only significant difference was that Cohort 1 had a higher percentage who answered "yes" they would like to rewatch the demonstration than did Cohort 2 (p=0.024). In this study, the live-video technique was found to be as effective as a conventional live demonstration for orthodontic practical education, suggesting that either technique could be used as an appropriate method for training in orthodontic wire bending.

6.
J Dent Educ ; 2019 Sep 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31548303

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of live-video and video demonstration methods in training dental students in orthodontic emergency applications. A total of 105 fifth-year dental students at a dental school in Turkey participated in the study in 2018. A pretest was given to the students to evaluate their level of knowledge about band cementing and re-bonding of brackets. Subsequently, two clinical applications were demonstrated with either live-video or video demonstration. During the live-video demonstration, the lecturer gave information about the steps of the procedure while performing the clinical application on the patient using a camera attached to the loupes. The students were able to see the process on the screens. During the video demonstration, previously recorded videos of those clinical applications were shown, and information was given to students in a classroom. On the next day, posttests were given to the students. The posttest also asked students to give their opinions about both methods. The results showed that the mean posttest scores on the video demonstration were significantly higher than on the live-video demonstration. However, no significant difference between the demonstration methods was found with regard to increase of scores from pre- to posttest. Most students preferred use of the two demonstrations together for education in the clinical orthodontics lecture. This study found that the two demonstration methods had comparable effects on increasing students' level of knowledge. However, from the students' perspective, the two should be used together to achieve the highest effect.

7.
Korean J Orthod ; 49(2): 81-88, 2019 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30941294

RESUMEN

Objective: The aim was to assess the intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities of temporomandibular joint linear measurements and condylar shape classifications performed with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: CBCT images of 30 patients were measured at two different time points by two orthodontists using the Dolphin 3D program (n = 60). Anterior, posterior, and superior joint space measurements and sagittal joint morphology classification in the sagittal view and medial and lateral joint space and mediolateral width measurements and coronal joint morphology classification in the coronal view were recorded. Intraclass-interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and kappa statistics were used to assess intraobserver and interobserver reliability for the measurements and morphology classifications, respectively. Results: The ICC values were good for measurements of the posterior joint space by observer I and for measurements of the posterior, medial, and lateral joint spaces by observer II, while the other intraobserver measurements were excellent. Only the mediolateral width measurements showed excellent interobserver ICC values, while the other measurements showed good interobserver ICC values. Intraobserver agreement for the sagittal morphology classifications was moderate (κ = 0.479) and almost perfect (κ = 0.858) for observers I and II, respectively, while the corresponding agreement for the coronal morphology classifications was substantial for both observers. The interobserver agreement values for sagittal and coronal morphology classifications were slight (κ = 0.181) and fair (κ = 0.265), respectively. Conclusions: Linear temporomandibular joint measurements were reproducible and reliable in both intraobserver and interobserver evaluations. However, interobserver agreement for assessments of condylar shape was low.

8.
Clin Oral Investig ; 23(6): 2813-2821, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30506226

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim was to compare the clinical performance of uncoated and adhesive precoated brackets bonded with either self-etching primer (SEP) or conventional two-step etch and primer method (CEM). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 63 patients with a mean age of 15.20 ± 1.6 years. In group I (n = 15), uncoated brackets and CEM; in group II (n = 16), precoated brackets and CEM; in group III (n = 16), uncoated brackets and SEP; in group IV (n = 16), precoated brackets and SEP were used for bonding. Bonding time, bracket failure rate, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were measured. The mean orthodontic treatment time was 1.13 ± 0.18 years. One-way variance ANOVA was used to determine bonding time differences and the chi-square test was used to determine differences in bracket failure rates and ARI scores. RESULTS: The bonding time was significantly lower for Groups III and IV, when compared to Groups I and II (p < 0.001). The bond failure rates were not different between the groups. Significant difference was observed between the procedures in relation to ARI scores (p < 0.001), which were higher in group IV. CONCLUSIONS: Precoated brackets with SEP application significantly reduced chair time without compromising bracket failure rate. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Precoated brackets with SEP application can be safely used for bonding. Regarding the mode of failure, this group can be thought as favorable with a reduced risk of enamel tear.


Asunto(s)
Recubrimiento Dental Adhesivo , Grabado Dental , Soportes Ortodóncicos , Adolescente , Cementos Dentales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Ensayo de Materiales , Estudios Prospectivos , Cementos de Resina , Resistencia al Corte
9.
Korean J Orthod ; 48(6): 367-376, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30450329

RESUMEN

Objective: This study was performed to investigate the changes in alveolar bone after maxillary incisor intrusion and to determine the related factors in deep-bite patients. Methods: Fifty maxillary central incisors of 25 patients were evaluated retrospectively. The maxillary incisors in Group I (12 patients; mean age, 16.51 ± 1.32 years) were intruded with a base-arch, while those in Group II (13 patients; mean age, 17.47 ± 2.71 years) were intruded with miniscrews. Changes in the alveolar envelope were assessed using pre-intrusion and post-intrusion cone-beam computed tomography images. Labial, palatal, and total bone thicknesses were evaluated at the crestal (3 mm), midroot (6 mm), and apical (9 mm) levels. Buccal and palatal alveolar crestal height, buccal bone height, and the prevalence of dehiscence were evaluated. Two-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to determine the significance of the changes. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis was performed to assess the relationship between dental and alveolar bone measurement changes. Results: Upper incisor inclination and intrusion changes were significantly greater in Group II than in Group I. With treatment, the alveolar bone thickness at the labial bone thickness (LBT, 3 and 6 mm) decreased significantly in Group II (p < 0.001) as compared to Group I. The LBT change at 3 mm was strongly and positively correlated with the amount of upper incisor intrusion (r = 0.539; p = 0.005). Conclusions: Change in the labial inclination and the amount of intrusion should be considered during upper incisor intrusion, as these factors increase the risk of alveolar bone loss.

10.
Angle Orthod ; 88(6): 779-784, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30080125

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES:: To compare the effects of different etching techniques, 12-, 24-bladed tungsten carbide burs, and polishing discs on tooth color changes during orthodontic treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: 59 individuals (mean age: 15.20 ± 1.59 years) were divided into four groups: 37% phosphoric acid and adhesive primer was used in Groups I and II whereas self-etch primer was used in Groups III and IV for enamel preparation. After orthodontic treatment, residual adhesives were cleaned with 12-bladed tungsten carbide burs in Groups I and III, while 24-bladed tungsten carbide burs were used in Groups II and IV. All teeth were polished with medium and fine Sof-Lex XT discs (3M ESPE, St Paul, Minnesota). Color measurements were taken from upper incisors and canines at pretreatment (T0), after cleaning with tungsten carbide burs (T1) and polishing with discs (T2). Wilcoxon test was used for evaluation of L*, a*, b* changes and Kruskal-Wallis for intergroup comparison of color changes. RESULTS:: L*, a*, b* values, except a* at Groups I, II, IV, and b* at Group III, changed significantly ( P < .05). Groups III and IV showed significantly different color alterations from T0 to T1 ( P < .05). After polishing, tooth color alterations were not significantly different among the groups. CONCLUSIONS:: In self-etch bonding groups, a 12-bladed tungsten carbide bur caused less color change than the 24-bladed tungsten carbide bur. Orthodontic treatment resulted with visible and clinically unacceptable tooth color alterations regardless of the enamel preparation and clean-up techniques. Polishing reduced the effect of tungsten carbide burs, but did not affect the total influence of orthodontic treatment on the tooth color.


Asunto(s)
Grabado Ácido Dental/efectos adversos , Desconsolidación Dental/efectos adversos , Decoloración de Dientes/etiología , Adolescente , Color , Cementos Dentales/efectos adversos , Pulido Dental/efectos adversos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Soportes Ortodóncicos/efectos adversos , Estudios Prospectivos , Adulto Joven
11.
J Clin Pediatr Dent ; 41(6): 486-493, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29087804

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of extraction, non-extraction and air-rotor stripping treatments on mandibular dental arch dimensions, lower incisor positions and evaluate their effects on the stability of the treatment. STUDY DESIGN: The sample consisted of 44 patients with Class I malocclusion and moderate crowding including 15 patients treated with extraction, 13 with air-rotor stripping (ARS), and 16 with non-extraction treatment. The records were taken at pretreatment (T0), end of active orthodontic treatment (T1), minimum 3 years post-treatment (T2). The model and cephalometric measurements were evaluated. For statistical analyses ANOVA and Welch test was applied. RESULTS: At post-retention period Little's irregularity indices were increased to 1.96 mm, 2.38 mm and 3.59 mm for extraction, ARS and non-extraction groups respectively (p<0.05). At T1-T2, intercanine widths were decreased significantly at all groups (p<0.05). The arch length and arch depth decreased significantly at extraction group (p<0.05) from T0 to T1 and remained the same at T2 (p>0.05). The lower incisors were retroclined with treatment and slightly proclined at post-retention period in extraction group. In ARS and non-extraction group, lower incisors proclined with treatment and remained the same at post-retention. CONCLUSION: At all groups the irregularity indices relapsed but did not return to pretreatment values. Although significant increase at intercanine width was only observed in non-extraction treatment, at post-retention phase, intercanine widths were significantly decreased at all groups. The changes at lower incisor inclinations relapsed slightly in extraction group but remained the same in the other groups.


Asunto(s)
Incisivo , Maloclusión de Angle Clase I/terapia , Ortodoncia Correctiva/métodos , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Mandíbula , Estudios Retrospectivos , Extracción Dental
12.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 152(3): 364-370, 2017 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28863917

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this retrospective study was to find out whether different Class II treatments would affect the airway sizes of patients having maxillary protrusion or mandibular retrusion. METHODS: The study sample comprised 57 Class II patients whose upper airway sizes were not significantly different at the start of treatment and whose sagittal skeletal jaw relationships showed that they had maxillary protrusion or mandibular retrusion. Twenty-two of them were treated with cervical headgear, 16 with activator, and 19 were selected as a control. Lateral cephalograms at the start of treatment and the end of orthopedic treatment were assessed. The intragroup comparisons were performed by using the paired-samples t test, and intergroup comparisons of the skeletal features and upper airways were performed with 1-way analysis of variance, with the Tukey test as a second step, at P < 0.05. RESULTS: The ANB angle decreased significantly in the treatment groups. The middle airway space and the SNB angle were significantly increased after the activator therapy (P < 0.05). The SNB angle increased and SN-1 decreased in the mandibular retrusion group when compared with both maxillary protrusion and control groups. No statistically significant difference between the maxillary protrusion and the mandibular retrusion groups was found regarding the upper airway sizes after cervical headgear or activator treatments, respectively (P > 0.05). The only significant differences observed in airway variables were at the middle airway space of the activator and control groups with an increase of 1.6 ± 2.5 mm and a decrease of 1.5 ± 2.3 mm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Orthopedic treatment with either cervical headgear or activator did not result in different upper airway changes, but activator treatment resulted in increased middle airway space with regard to the Class II control group.


Asunto(s)
Aparatos de Tracción Extraoral , Maloclusión de Angle Clase II/terapia , Mandíbula/patología , Maxilar/patología , Boca/patología , Nariz/patología , Faringe/patología , Cefalometría , Niño , Aparatos de Tracción Extraoral/efectos adversos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Maloclusión de Angle Clase II/patología
13.
J Clin Exp Dent ; 9(3): e417-e423, 2017 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28298985

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate and compare the positions and dimensions of the temporomandibular joint and its components, respectively, in patients with Class II division 1 and division 2 malocclusions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Computed tomography images of 14 patients with Class II division 1 and 14 patients with Class II division 2 malocclusion were included with a mean age of 11.4 ± 1.2 years. The following temporomandibular joint measurements were made with OsiriX medical imaging software program. From the sagittal images, the anterior, superior, and posterior joint spaces and the mandibular fossa depths were measured. From the axial images, the greatest anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the mandibular condyles, angles between the long axis of the mandibular condyle and midsagittal plane, and vertical distances from the geometric centers of the condyles to midsagittal plane were measured. The independent samples t-test was used for comparing the measurements between the two sides and between the Class II division 1 and 2 groups. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were observed between the right and left temporomandibular joints; therefore, the data were pooled. There were statistically significant differences between the Class II division 1 and 2 groups with regard to mandibular fossa depth and anterior joint space measurements. CONCLUSIONS: In Class II patients, the right and left temporomandibular joints were symmetrical. In the Class II division 1 group, the anterior joint space was wider than that in Class II division 2 group, and the mandibular fossa was deeper and wider in the Class II division 1 group. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, Class II malocclusion, Cone beam computed tomography.

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