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1.
Geriatr Nurs ; 2019 Apr 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31036404

RESUMEN

Approximately 40% of older adults drink alcohol. Older adults living in community care residences are a vulnerable population at risk for alcohol use related problems especially for those age 65 years and older who are taking medications, have health problems, and have risky alcohol consumption. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based approach for individuals at risk for alcohol use disorders. A quality improvement project evaluated SBIRT education effects on nursing staff knowledge and attitudes related to alcohol use, and resident alcohol use. The staffs' SBIRT knowledge and alcohol related attitudes increased significantly. The staff documented SBIRT intervention 231 times in three months' post training.

2.
Can J Nurs Res ; : 844562119840172, 2019 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30947519

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Interprofessional education strategies are becoming more prevalent as nursing schools integrate interprofessional practice activities into their curricula. PURPOSE: This paper presents the results of a federally funded project to deliver online interprofessional education to nursing students on screening for alcohol and substance use in rural areas, in which their perceptions about interprofessional education were measured. METHODS: A quasi-experimental within-subjects repeated measures design was utilized. Students in the bachelor or associate degree program were recruited from two rural nursing schools. A demographic questionnaire, Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Questionnaire, Drug and Drug Problems Questionnaire, and Interprofessional Education Perception Scale were utilized. General linear modeling was used to determine changes in these measurements over time. Data collection was performed at pretraining, posttraining, and following an online interprofessional dialogue. RESULTS: The study consisted of 89 nursing students. The participants were 87% female (n = 77/89) and 91% white (n = 81/89); their mean age was 24.9 years (standard deviation = 10.36). Analysis of evaluation questionnaires demonstrated increased levels of confidence in working with patients who consume alcohol or other drugs and on certain aspects of interprofessional education. CONCLUSION: Online interprofessional preservice education holds the potential to positively increase nursing students' confidence in working with patients and to increase their interprofessional practice.

3.
J Dent Educ ; 82(5): 469-474, 2018 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29717070

RESUMEN

Dental professionals have an opportunity to screen for substance use, provide targeted feedback based on patients' oral health, provide patient education, and refer for further assessment as needed. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on dental hygiene students of an interprofessional Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) educational intervention with standardized patients as a tool for initiating discussions on alcohol and drug use with patients. Starting in 2015, dental hygiene students in two classes at the University of Pittsburgh participated with nursing students in one and a half hours of didactic instruction followed within a ten-week period by SBIRT simulation scenarios utilizing standardized patients, with subsequent debriefing of students by faculty. Students' attitudes were assessed before and after the didactic session and immediately after the SBIRT simulation, using the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perceptions Questionnaire and the Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire. All 67 dental hygiene students in the program at the time participated in the educational intervention and surveys. The results showed significant positive changes in role security, defined as the acceptance of SBIRT delivery as part of their role identity as dental hygienists, following the intervention. This study found that the IPE intervention with dental hygiene and nursing students improved the dental hygiene students' attitudes through using SBIRT.


Asunto(s)
Higienistas Dentales/educación , Educación en Enfermería , Comunicación Interdisciplinaria , Simulación de Paciente , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/diagnóstico , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Adulto Joven
5.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 39(2): 151-158, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29370546

RESUMEN

Nurses are in an ideal position to talk to their patients of reproductive age about alcohol use and encourage the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Effective conversations can be efficiently included in the clinical encounter to identify alcohol misuse and offer appropriate follow-up. This report presents results of an environmental scan of resources relevant to nursing professionals and nurses' role in addressing alcohol misuse. Gaps in nursing education and practice guidelines with regard to defining the nursing role in preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancies were revealed. Findings identified a need to promote adoption among nurses of evidence-based preventive practices to prevent alcohol misuse.

6.
J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc ; 24(6): 510-521, 2018 Nov/Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29313418

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Stigma associated with substance use is considered a barrier to implementing Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) and assisting patients to receive appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVES: To test the efficacy of SBIRT education and training in changing undergraduate nursing students' attitudes about working with patients who have problems with alcohol and opioid use. DESIGN: A sample of 49 undergraduate nursing students were surveyed, using five subscales, at three time points. RESULTS: After a 15-week semester that included (a) SBIRT education and (b) weekly clinical experiences with patients who had alcohol use problems the undergraduate nursing students' stigma decreased as measured by three of the five subscales. The students' attitudes toward working with patients who had opioid use problems exhibited favorable change as measured by four of the five subscales. CONCLUSION: SBIRT education and training for undergraduate nursing students might help mitigate some of their stigma toward working with patients who have mild to moderate alcohol and opioid use problems.

7.
J Transcult Nurs ; 29(4): 387-394, 2018 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28854846

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Cultural competency is an integral component in undergraduate nursing education to provide patient-centered care and addressing patients' cultural differences. Students need to consider the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use/misuse in patients from all cultures. This project combines cultural competency education, simulation, and educating students to use screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for alcohol and other drug use. METHOD: Culturally diverse simulation scenarios were developed and used in the simulation lab with students to reduce stigma surrounding other cultures while learning an evidence-based practice to screen and intervene with patients who use/misuse substances. RESULTS: Results show students value simulation and 91% of the students felt that they were able to apply culturally competent knowledge after the simulation experience. DISCUSSION: Cultural competency principles can be embedded in teaching the broader evidence-based practice of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment with undergraduate students. This is a replicable teaching methodology that could be adapted in other schools of nursing.

8.
Subst Abus ; 38(4): 464-467, 2017 Oct-Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28622136

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Despite the devastating impact of alcohol and other drug involvement and misuse within society, medical students still receive very limited exposure to these issues. The Scaife Advanced Medical Student Fellowship in Alcohol and Other Drug Dependency, offered by the Institute for Research, Education and Training in Addictions for over 10 years, offers a unique, 3-week intensive educational experience, including didactic, observation, and experiential learning in these topics to first-year medical students. The goal of this project was to evaluate the impact of the Scaife Fellowship on medical students' attitudes toward patients with alcohol and other drug involvement 1 to 5 years after completion of the experience. METHODS: Past Scaife students and individuals who applied but did not attend were located and recruited to participate in an online attitude survey. RESULTS: Results indicated that Scaife Fellowship students largely retain their sense of role security around working with patients with alcohol and other drug involvement at the follow-up time point. Although therapeutic commitment or the motivation to work with these patients decreased for drug use, the decrease was smaller than that typically noted in the literature. The group of comparison students showed lower scores on both subscales at the evaluation time point compared with Scaife students. CONCLUSIONS: A three-week experiential program significantly improved medical students' Role Security and Therapeutic Commitment toward working with patients with substance use disorders. Moreover, the positive effects gained from the program were sustained over time.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Adulto , Curriculum , Becas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Adulto Joven
9.
Int Emerg Nurs ; 33: 32-36, 2017 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28438480

RESUMEN

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) diagnoses in the ED co-occur with injury-related presenting conditions including: falls, motor vehicle accidents, poisonings, and both intentional and unintentional injuries. Clinical attention to ED admissions resulting from hazardous AOD use can significantly improve patient care and reduce high cost utilization of ED visits and treatment. The EDRN-SBIRT project is designed to improve the knowledge and attitudes of ED nurses working in a large academic medical center to identify and address risky AOD use as it relates to an ED visit. ED nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward patients with AOD use can be improved through SBIRT education. SBIRT education can establish an evidence-based standard of nursing practice to improve healthcare outcomes, but it must be reinforced with ongoing ED review and supportive educational sessions until practice is firmly established.


Asunto(s)
Educación Continua en Enfermería/métodos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Rol de la Enfermera/psicología , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/normas , Adulto , Anciano , Alcoholismo/enfermería , Educación Continua en Enfermería/normas , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Derivación y Consulta/normas , Derivación y Consulta/tendencias , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/enfermería , Triaje/métodos , Triaje/tendencias
10.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 37(9): 682-687, 2016 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27387524

RESUMEN

Although substance use is prevalent in the United States, the majority of people who misuse substances do not receive appropriate treatment. This paper describes, (1) an interprofessional education (IPE) program for health professionals to provide Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment to rural substance use patients, and (2) compares registered nurses' [RNs] and behavioral health professionals' [BHPs] attitudes to work with those patients and their perceptions on IPE. A data analysis of 62 RNs and 36 BHPs shows statistically significant increases in both attitudes and perceptions. This paper discusses the implications of the IPE program vis-á-vis substance use treatment.

11.
J Interprof Care ; 30(4): 542-4, 2016 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27295396

RESUMEN

Interprofessional collaborative practice expands resources in rural and underserved communities. This article explores the impact of an online education programme on the perceptions of healthcare providers about interprofessional care within alcohol and drug use screening for rural residents. Nurses, behavioural health counsellors, and public health professionals participated in an evidence-based practice (screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment-SBIRT) model that targets individuals who use alcohol and other drugs in a risky manner. SBIRT is recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force as a universal, evidence-based screening tool. Online modules, case simulation practice, and interprofessional dialogues are used to deliver practice-based learning experiences. A quasi-experimental method with pre-tests and post-tests was utilised. Results indicate increased perceptions of professional competence, need for cooperation, actual cooperation, and role values pre-to-post training. Implications suggest that online interprofessional education is useful but the added component of professional dialogues regarding patient cases offers promise in promoting collaborative practice.


Asunto(s)
Conducta Cooperativa , Personal de Salud/educación , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Tamizaje Masivo , Detección de Abuso de Sustancias , Adulto , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Población Rural , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
14.
J Addict Nurs ; 25(3): 122-9, 2014 Jul-Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25202808

RESUMEN

Although Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is an effective early intervention when used across healthcare settings, its implementation has been difficult, in part because of lack of training, healthcare providers' feelings of low self-efficacy in performing SBIRT, and negative attitudes about people who use alcohol and drugs. This study used qualitative descriptive methods to examine baccalaureate nursing students' experiences with practicing SBIRT in clinical rotations following in-depth classroom work and skill-based training. Fifty-five junior level nursing students participated in four focus groups. Three overarching themes describe students' experiences with SBIRT. Students expressed a positive impact of the training on their attitudes and feelings of self-efficacy regarding the use of SBIRT, differences in opinions about whether SBIRT should be used universally with all patients or as a targeted intervention with only some patients, and that SBIRT is a nursing responsibility. These results suggest that education and training can affect attitudes and efficacy, but that attention needs to be paid to how SBIRT is implemented within different healthcare settings.


Asunto(s)
Proceso de Enfermería , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/enfermería , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Bachillerato en Enfermería , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Hospitales Universitarios , Humanos , Masculino , Pennsylvania
15.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 45(9): 403-8, 2014 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25153430

RESUMEN

Educating nursing faculty about the use of an evidence-based practice to screen and intervene earlier along the continuum of alcohol and other drug use, misuse, and dependence is essential in today's health care arena. Misuse of alcohol and other drugs is a significant problem for both individual health and societal economic welfare. The purpose of this article is to describe nursing faculty buy-in for the implementation of an evidence-based addiction training program at a university-based school of nursing. Derived from an academic-community partnership, the training program results suggest implications for continuing education and curriculum innovation in schools of nursing and clinical practice. The training content presented can be used in continuing education for nursing faculty across all types of nursing school programs and professional nursing staff employed in multiple settings. The training program was funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Educación Continua en Enfermería/organización & administración , Docentes de Enfermería , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/diagnóstico , Instrucción por Computador , Curriculum , Humanos , Pennsylvania , Derivación y Consulta
16.
Nurse Educ ; 39(3): 126-34, 2014 May-Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24743176

RESUMEN

Alcohol use and other drug use affect patient healthcare outcomes. This article describes a classroom-to-clinical approach teaching nursing students to utilize motivational interviewing techniques to support patient behavior change. Through the lens of a universal prevention method, nursing students learned about reward circuit activation leading to risky substance use and the difference between addiction and at-risk use. Specific assessment tools and motivational interviewing techniques were presented in the classroom. Students then applied their knowledge in simulation laboratories and clinical rotations.


Asunto(s)
Alcoholismo/enfermería , Evaluación en Enfermería/métodos , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/enfermería , Enseñanza/métodos , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Entrevista Motivacional , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Investigación Metodológica en Enfermería , Medición de Riesgo , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología
17.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 51(10): 29-37, 2013 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23855435

RESUMEN

Preparing nursing students to apply an evidence-based screening and brief intervention approach with patients has the potential to reduce patients' risky alcohol and drug use. Responding to Mollica, Hyman, and Mann's article published in 2011, the current article describes implementation results of an Addiction Training for Nurses program of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) embedded within an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Results reveal that students in other schools of nursing would benefit from similar, significant training on substance use disorders and SBIRT. Training satisfaction surveys (N = 488) indicate students were satisfied with the quality of the training experience. More than 90% of students strongly agreed or agreed that the training was relevant to their nursing careers and would help their patients. Additional clinical practice and skill development may increase students' reported effectiveness in working with the topic area of substance use and SBIRT.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/enfermería , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/prevención & control , Enseñanza/métodos , Adulto , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Tamizaje Masivo/enfermería , Persona de Mediana Edad , Desarrollo de Programa , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Psicoterapia Breve/educación , Derivación y Consulta , Estados Unidos
18.
Res Nurs Health ; 36(4): 412-22, 2013 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23633092

RESUMEN

The Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (AAPPQ) is a multi-dimensional measure of clinicians' attitudes toward working with patients with alcohol problems. In the past 35 years, five- and six-subscale versions and a short version of the AAPPQ have been published. While the reliability of the AAPPQ subscales has remained acceptable, the factor structure has not been verified using confirmatory techniques. In the current study, we split a sample of 299 baccalaureate nursing students to use exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). When compared to the original six-factor solution and an imposed six-factor structure in CFA, the EFA seven-factor solution with three original items (19, 20, and 25) removed had the best model fit.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Relacionados con Alcohol/enfermería , Trastornos Relacionados con Alcohol/psicología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto , Bachillerato en Enfermería , Análisis Factorial , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Adulto Joven
19.
Subst Abus ; 34(2): 122-8, 2013.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23577905

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) can reduce alcohol use and negative health outcomes in patients with risky substance use. However, negative attitudes that some health care professionals have toward patients who use substances are a barrier to implementing SBIRT. METHODS: The University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, in partnership with the Institute for Research, Education, and Training in Addictions (IRETA), developed a curriculum to train baccalaureate student nurses to deliver SBIRT. RESULTS: Following SBIRT education and training, students' perceived attitudes toward patients who use alcohol became more positive. Less robust changes were found for attitudes related to patients who use drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses composing the largest group of healthcare workers are in key positions to screen, intervene, and provide education about substance use.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Desarrollo de Programa , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/terapia
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