Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 12 de 12
Filtrar
Más filtros










Base de datos
Intervalo de año de publicación
1.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256136, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34469453

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Political ideologies drove public actions and health behaviors in the first year of the global pandemic. Different ideas about contagion, health behaviors, and the actions of governing bodies impacted the spread of the virus and health and life. Researchers used an immediate, mixed methods design to explore sociocultural responses to the virus and identified differences and similarities in anxiety, fear, blame, and perceptions of nation across political divides. METHODS: Researchers conducted 60 in-depth, semi-structured interviews and administered over 1,000 questionnaires with people living in the United States. The team analyzed data through an exploratory and confirmatory sequential mixed methods design. RESULTS: In the first months of the pandemic interviewees cited economic inequality, untrustworthy corporations and other entities, and the federal government as threats to life and pandemic control. Participants invoked ideas about others to determine blame. Findings reveal heavy associations between lack of safety during a public health crisis and blame of "culture" and government power across the political spectrum. CONCLUSION: Data indicate anxiety across political differences related to ideas of contagion and the maleficence of a powerful elite. Findings on how people understand the nation, politics, and pandemic management contribute to understanding dimensions of health behaviors and underlying connections between anxiety and the uptake of conspiracy theories in public health. The article ends with recommendations drawn from project findings for future pandemic response.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad , COVID-19 , Miedo/psicología , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/psicología , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/psicología , Gobierno Federal , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Salud Pública , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
2.
J Community Psychol ; 49(6): 2059-2070, 2021 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33729586

RESUMEN

International research collaborators conducted research investigating sociocultural responses to the Covid-19 pandemic. Our mixed methods research design includes surveys and interviews conducted between March and September of 2020 including 249 of 506 survey responses and 18 of 50 in-depth, exploratory, semi-structured interviews with self-defined politically left-leaning women in the United States. We employ a sequential design to analyze statistical and qualitative data. Despite international data suggesting that trust in federal governments reduces anxiety, women who did not trust and actively opposed the Trump administration reported lower levels of anxiety than expected. Results indicate reliance on and development of new forms of connection that seem to mitigate symptomatic anxieties when living in opposition. Women living in opposition to the leadership of the federal government use and develop resources to help them cope. Research on coping strategies and mental health and anxiety during crisis can inform recommendations for ways to support and strengthen sense of coherence during tumultuous times.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , COVID-19/psicología , Gobierno Federal , Liderazgo , Política , Confianza/psicología , Adulto , Ansiedad/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
3.
Med Anthropol ; 39(8): 655-659, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941085

RESUMEN

Anthropologists have long known how perceptions of contagion play out along the lines of xenophobia and racism. Months after the beginning of the global Cover-19 pandemic, predictions by anthropologists of xenophobic ideologies and actions have come to pass. In the United States people understand the global pandemic not as biology, but as the manifestation of political affiliation, difference, connection, and disconnection. COVID-19 is, according to public perception, dangerous because it maliciously mutates to attack. It is "a guy we don't know." Relationships between the mysteriousness of the virus and heightened visibility of longstanding inequality in the United States form new contexts for existing social tensions. These dynamics provide a backdrop against which the ongoing commitment to uprisings connected to the Black Lives Matter movement unfold. Here I draw on analysis of 50 semi-structured interviews we conducted from March to August of 2020 demonstrating how understandings of the biology of a virus are woven into perceptions of politics, inequality, and the fractures of a divided nation. To understand social and political responses to the global pandemic it is essential that we continue to investigate xenophobia, inequality, and racism alongside the biological impact of SARS-CoV-2.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/psicología , COVID-19/transmisión , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/virología , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Política , Racismo , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Socioeconómicos , Estados Unidos , Xenofobia
4.
Health Promot Pract ; : 1524839920947419, 2020 Aug 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32812473

RESUMEN

Community engagement has become a leading framework for supporting health equity. The process of engagement includes groups working together to continually identify and erode existing inequalities to promote a justice-oriented approach to health and wellness for all. Missing from the literature is a fine-grained study of processes that occur between and among project partners building the foundation for ongoing trust and reciprocity. Our project, Health Resilience among American Indians in Arizona, brought new and seasoned researchers together to collect and analyze data on healthcare provider knowledge and American Indian resilience. Four years after the conclusion of the project, central members of the team developed a postproject self-assessment to investigate lasting impacts of project participation using what we call an "Iterative Poly-knowledge Evaluation Cycle approach." Results highlight the value of flexibility of roles and organic change within projects, the importance of a focus on strengths rather than deficits, and the identification of lasting change on project team members at all levels to build and bolster multisectoral scaffolding for partnerships for health. We present this case study to contribute to an understanding of impacts of community-engaged, Indigenous research projects on people who work together toward challenging existing systems of inequality for better community health.

5.
6.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32708798

RESUMEN

In 2020, global injustice has taken center stage during the uprising of the Black Lives Matter movement and other social movements. Activists are calling attention to longstanding disparities in health outcomes and an urgent need for justice. Given the global socio-political moment, how can health researchers draw on current critical theory and social movements to create structures for equitable outcomes in health research and practice? Here, we demonstrate principles for effective health research and social justice work that builds on community-engaged approaches by weaving critical Indigenous approaches into structural project designs. Our project, "Health Resilience among American Indians in Arizona", brought new and seasoned researchers together to collect and analyze data on the knowledge of healthcare providers concerning American Indian health and well-being. Four years after the conclusion of the project, the team developed and created a post-project self-assessment to investigate lasting impacts of project participation. In this communication, we discuss the principles of defining and measuring the capacity to build together. This work responds to the call from Indigenous scholars and community leaders to build an internal narrative of change. While we will not present the full instrument, we will discuss building a strong foundation using the principles of engagement for planning and implementing justice and change.


Asunto(s)
Justicia Social , Arizona , Procesos de Grupo , Humanos , Indios Norteamericanos , Narración
7.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 30(1): 221-237, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30827979

RESUMEN

American Indians are disproportionately affected by factors that lead to health disparities, however many Native people demonstrate resilience when faced with health risks. Study objectives were to use a resilience framework to identify wellness strategies among American Indian people and to assess health care provider perceptions of American Indian wellness. Participants included 39 American Indian adults who self-reported resilient change and 22 health care providers who served American Indian patients. Thematic categories across American Indian and health care provider data were identified: 1) relationships inform resilience; 2) prejudice stymies resilience; and 3) place shapes resilience. Results indicated the salience of relationships in demonstrating resilience. Identified challenges and supporters of resilience are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/organización & administración , Personal de Salud/psicología , Indios Norteamericanos/psicología , Resiliencia Psicológica , Adulto , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Indios Norteamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud
8.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30585213

RESUMEN

Marginalized communities have a documented distrust of research grounded in negative portrayals in the academic literature. Yet, trusted partnerships, the foundation for Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), require time to build the capacity for joint decision-making, equitable involvement of academically trained and community investigators, and co-learning. Trust can be difficult to develop within the short time between a funding opportunity announcement and application submission. Resources to support community- and academic-based investigators' time to discuss contexts, concerns, integration of expertise and locally acceptable research designs and data collection are limited. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Center for American Indian Resilience and the Southwest Health Equity Research Collaborative have implemented an internal funding mechanism to support community and academic-based investigators' travel cost and time to discuss complementary areas of interest and skills and to decide if moving forward with a partnership and a collaborative grant proposal would be beneficial to the community. The rationale and administration of this Community-Campus Partnership Support (CCPS) Program are described and four examples of supported efforts are provided. Centers and training programs frequently fund pilot grants to support junior investigators and/or exploratory research. This CCPS mechanism should be considered as precursor to pilot work, to stimulate partnership building without the pressure of an approaching grant application deadline.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/organización & administración , Indios Norteamericanos , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Conducta Cooperativa , Toma de Decisiones , Humanos , Apoyo a la Investigación como Asunto , Confianza
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31663067

RESUMEN

American Indian or Alaska Natives have the highest rates of current cigarette (36.5%) and smokeless tobacco use (5.3%), and tobacco product (40.1%) and the second highest rate of current cigar use (6.1%) compared to all other racial-ethnic groups in the U.S. rates of American Indian or Alaska Native tobacco use vary by gender. Few studies examine perceptions of tobacco use among tribal members residing on and off the reservation. This study fills a gap in the literature by reporting the perceptions of 34 enrolled members of a southwestern tribe who reside on and off a tribal land using a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) design through a collaboration between a university and a tribal health program. Researchers conducted seven focus groups; four on the southwest reservation and three within an urban community. The discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a multi-investigator consensus model. The use of tobacco (commercial or traditional) in southwest tribes is essential to cultural practices. Results depicted different views on cultural meaning and health impacts of commercial and traditional tobacco. Findings suggest the importance of local research to understand dimensions of tobacco use before moving forward with tobacco cessation programming.

10.
Qual Res ; 16(5): 592-600, 2016 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27833454

RESUMEN

Community-engaged approaches to research and practice continue to show success in addressing health equity and making long-term change for partnership relationships and structures of power. The usefulness of these approaches is either diminished or bolstered by community trust, which can be challenging for partnerships to achieve. In this research note we present an example process for recruiting, interviewing, and hiring community researchers as a starting place for capacity building and for laying the foundation for data collection and analysis in health-related community projects.

11.
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics ; 11(2): 191-8, 2016 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27074911

RESUMEN

Thorough data management is crucial for the protection of people who participate in research and the ability for researchers to share results with the public. The impact of inadequate adherence to data management is particularly evident in small field sites and among vulnerable populations partoicipating in Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR). CBPR presents exciting opportunities for multimedia and multi-sectoral dissemination of research results and policy change, especially concerning the impact of research on health equity for underrepresented populations. In this article, we discuss how we defined data boundaries and protections to adhere to ethical standards while also prioritizing data dissemination while using CBPR with American Indians in Arizona. Although complex partnerships can introduce additional risks to data oversight, data management practices can also increase opportunities for wide-reaching dissemination. We hope to contribute to the literature on data sharing in multi-partnership projects to bolster the impact of dissemination while also protecting participants and populations who chose to collaborate in research and policy practices.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/ética , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Confidencialidad , Conducta Cooperativa , Recolección de Datos/ética , Indios Norteamericanos , Difusión de la Información/ética , Arizona , Discusiones Bioéticas , Humanos , Privacidad , Investigadores , Características de la Residencia , Poblaciones Vulnerables
12.
Am J Public Health ; 102(7): 1250-4, 2012 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22594736

RESUMEN

Arizona's Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act, signed into law in April 2010, is already adversely affecting public health in the state. Our findings from a study on childhood obesity in Flagstaff suggest that the law changed health-seeking behaviors of residents of a predominantly Latino neighborhood by increasing fear, limiting residents' mobility, and diminishing trust of officials. These changes could exacerbate barriers to healthy living, limit access to care, and affect the overall safety of the neighborhood. Documentation of the on-the-ground impact of Arizona's law and similar state-level immigration policies is urgently needed. To inform effective policymaking, such research must be community engaged and include safety measures beyond the usual protocols.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica , Emigración e Inmigración/legislación & jurisprudencia , Salud Pública , Política Pública/legislación & jurisprudencia , Gobierno Estatal , Arizona , Humanos , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Estados Unidos
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...