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1.
J Am Coll Surg ; 2020 Feb 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32113028

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Changes in care providers and hospitals after emergency general surgery (EGS) (care discontinuity) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The cause of these worse outcomes is unknown. Our goal was to determine if hospital quality is associated with mortality after readmissions independent of continuity in care. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective analysis of Medicare inpatient claims (2007 to 2015). All inpatients older than 65 years of age who underwent 1 of 7 EGS procedures shown to represent 80% of EGS volume, complications, and mortality nationally, were included. Care discontinuity was defined as readmission within 30 days to a nonindex hospital. Hospital quality was determined by hospital-level, risk-adjusted mortality rates by EGS procedure and categorized into high quality (HQ) and low quality (LQ). The primary outcome was overall mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association of discontinuity and mortality. RESULTS: There were 882,929 EGS patients, 87,232 of whom were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Care discontinuity was independently associated with mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.23; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.29). When readmitted patients were stratified by quality of index and readmitting hospital, mortality was associated with the quality of both the index hospital and the readmitting hospital. The highest mortality rate was observed in patients with index admission at low-quality hospitals and readmission to a different low-quality hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Both care discontinuity and hospital quality are independently associated with mortality in EGS patients. These data support maintaining continuity of care, even at low performing hospitals.

2.
J Surg Res ; 247: 287-293, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31699538

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Low hospital volume for emergency general surgery (EGS) procedures is associated with worse patient outcomes within the civilian health care system. The military maintains treatment facilities (MTFs) in remote locations to provide access to service members and their families. We sought to determine if patients treated at low-volume MTFs for EGS conditions experience worse outcomes compared with high-volume centers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed TRICARE data from 2006 to 2014. Patients were identified using an established coding algorithm for EGS admission. MTFs were divided into quartiles based on annual EGS volume. Outcomes included 30-d mortality, complications, and readmissions. Logistic regression models adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic differences in case-mix including EGS condition, surgical intervention, and comorbidities were used to determine the influence of hospital volume on outcomes. RESULTS: We identified 106,915 patients treated for an EGS condition at 79 MTFs. The overall mortality rate was 0.21%, with complications occurring in 8.55% and readmissions in 4.45%. After risk adjustment, lowest-volume MTFs did not demonstrate significantly higher odds of mortality (OR: 2.02, CI: 0.45-9.06) or readmissions (OR: 0.77, CI: 0.54-1.11) compared with the highest-volume centers. Lowest-volume facilities exhibited a lower likelihood of complications (OR: 0.76, CI: 0.59-0.98). CONCLUSIONS: EGS patients treated at low-volume MTFs did not experience worse clinical outcomes when compared with high-volume centers. Remote MTFs appear to provide care for EGS conditions comparable with that of high-volume facilities. Our findings speak against the need to reduce services at small, critical access facilities within the military health care system.

3.
J Surg Res ; 247: 364-371, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31767278

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Risk prediction accuracy of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) Surgical Risk Calculator has been shown to differ between emergency and elective surgery. Benchmarking methods of clinical performance require accurate risk estimation, and current methods rarely account for admission source; therefore, our goal was to assess whether the ACS-NSQIP predicts mortality comparably between transferred and nontransferred emergency general surgery (EGS) cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study using the ACS-NSQIP database from 2005 to 2014including all inpatients who underwent one of seven previously described EGS procedures. The admission source was classified as directly admitted versus transferred from an outside emergency room or an acute care facility. We compared the accuracy of ACS-NSQIP-predicted mortality probabilities using the observed-to-expected (O:E) ratio and Brier score. A subgroup analysis was performed to compare accuracy of high-risk and low-risk procedures. RESULTS: A total of 206,103 EGS admissions were identified, of which 6.97% were transfers. Overall mortality was 3.26% for the entire cohort and 10.24% within the transfer group. The O:E ratios generated by ACS-NSQIP models differed between transferred patients (O:E = 1.0, 95% confidence interval = 0.97-1.02) and nontransferred patients (O:E = 1.12, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.14). The Brier score for transferred patients was greater than that for nontransferred patients (0.063 versus 0.018, respectively) showing higher accuracy for nontransferred patients. CONCLUSIONS: The ACS-NSQIP risk estimates used for benchmarking differ between transferred and nontransferred EGS cases. Analyses of the Brier score by the ACS-NSQIP risk calculator demonstrated inferior prediction for transferred patients. This increased burden on accepting institutions will have an impact on quality metrics and should be considered for benchmarking of clinical performance.

4.
J Surg Res ; 245: 629-635, 2020 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31522036

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Emergency general surgery (EGS) accounts for more than 2 million U.S. hospital admissions annually. Low-income EGS patients have higher rates of postoperative adverse events (AEs) than high-income patients. This may be related to health care segregation (a disparity in access to high-quality centers). The emergent nature of EGS conditions and the limited number of EGS providers in rural areas may result in less health care segregation and thereby less variability in EGS outcomes in rural areas. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of income on AEs for both rural and urban EGS patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The National Inpatient Sample (2007-2014) was queried for patients receiving one of 10 common EGS procedures. Multivariate regression models stratified by income quartiles in urban and rural cohorts adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, and other hospital-based factors were used to determine the rates of surgical AEs (mortality, complications, and failure to rescue [FTR]). RESULTS: 1,687,088 EGS patients were identified; 16.60% (n = 280,034) of them were rural. In the urban cohort, lower income quartiles were associated with higher odds of AEs (mortality OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.15-1.27], complications, 1.07 [1.06-1.09]; FTR, 1.17 [1.10-1.24] P < 0.001). In the rural context, income quartiles were not associated with the higher odds of AE (mortality OR, 1.14 [0.83-1.55], P = 0.42; complications, 1.06 [0.97-1,16], P = 1.17; FTR, 1.12 [0.79-1.59], P = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Lower income is associated with higher postoperative AEs in the urban setting but not in a rural environment. This socioeconomic disparity in EGS outcomes in urban settings may reflect health care segregation, a differential access to high-quality health care for low-income patients.


Asunto(s)
Tratamiento de Urgencia/efectos adversos , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/economía , Renta/estadística & datos numéricos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/efectos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Tratamiento de Urgencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Fracaso de Rescate en Atención a la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/economía , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Mortalidad Hospitalaria , Hospitales Rurales/estadística & datos numéricos , Hospitales Urbanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Pacientes Internos/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/etiología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
5.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 87(3): 630-635, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31205220

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Adhesive small-bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common surgical condition accounting for a significant proportion of acute surgical admissions and surgeries. The implementation of a high-osmolar water-soluble contrast challenge has repeatedly been shown to reduce hospital length of stay and possibly the need for surgery in SBO patients. The effect of low-osmolar water-soluble contrast challenge however, is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of an SBO pathway including a low-osmolar water-soluble contrast challenge. METHODS: A prospective cohort of patients admitted for SBO were placed on an evidence-based SBO pathway including low-osmolar water-soluble contrast between January 2017 and October 2018 and were compared with a historical cohort of patients prior to the implementation of the pathway from September 2013 through December 2014. The primary outcome was length of stay less than 4 days with a secondary outcome of failure of nonoperative management. RESULTS: There were 140 patients enrolled in the SBO pathway during the study period and 101 historic controls. The SBO pathway was independently associated with a length of stay less than 4 days (odds ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.00). Median length of stay for patients that were successfully managed nonoperatively was lower in the SBO pathway cohort compared with controls (3 days vs. 4 days, p = 0.04). Rates of readmission, surgery, and bowel resection were not significantly different between the two cohorts. CONCLUSION: Implementation of an SBO pathway using a low-osmolarity contrast is associated with decreased hospital length of stay. Rates of readmission, surgery, and need for bowel resection for those undergoing surgery were unchanged. An SBO pathway utilizing low-osmolarity water-soluble contrast is safe and effective in reducing length of stay in the nonoperative management of adhesive small-bowel obstructions. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level IV.


Asunto(s)
Medios de Contraste/uso terapéutico , Vías Clínicas , Obstrucción Intestinal/diagnóstico por imagen , Yohexol/uso terapéutico , Anciano , Femenino , Estudio Históricamente Controlado , Humanos , Obstrucción Intestinal/cirugía , Obstrucción Intestinal/terapia , Tiempo de Internación , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Prospectivos , Radiografía Abdominal , Resultado del Tratamiento
6.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 87(1): 104-110, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31033884

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is known to be associated with higher morbidity and mortality following injury. However, the impact of individual SES on long-term outcomes after trauma is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of educational level and income on long-term outcomes after injury. METHODS: Trauma patients with moderate to severe injuries admitted to three Level-I trauma centers were contacted 6 months to 12 months after injury to evaluate functional status, return to work/school, chronic pain, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Lower SES status was determined by educational level and income. Adjusted logistic regression models were built to determine the association between educational level and income (lowest vs. highest quartile determined by census-tract area) on each of the long-term outcomes. A sensitivity analysis was performed using the national median household income ($57,617) as threshold for defining low versus high income. RESULTS: A total of 1,516 patients were followed during a 36-month period. Forty-nine percent had a low educational level, and 26% were categorized in the low-income group. Mean (SD) age and injury severity score were 60 (21.5) and 14.3 (7.3), respectively, with most patients (94%) having blunt injuries. After adjusting for confounders, low educational level was associated with poor long-term outcomes: functional limitation [odds ratio (OR), 1.78 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41-2.26)], has not yet returned to work/school [OR, 2.48 (95% CI, 1.70-3.62)], chronic pain [OR, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.27-2.10)], and PTSD [OR, 2.23 (95% CI, 1.60-3.11)]. Similarly, low-income level was associated with not yet return to work/school [OR, 1.97 (95% CI, 1.09-3.56)], chronic pain [OR,1.70 (95% CI, 1.14-2.53)], and PTSD [OR, 2.20 (95% CI, 1.21-3.98)]. In sensitivity analyses, there were no significant differences in long-term outcomes between income levels. CONCLUSION: Low educational level is strongly associated with worse long-term outcomes after injury. However, although household income is associated with long-term outcomes, it matters where the threshold is. The impact of different socioeconomic measures on long-term outcomes after trauma cannot be assumed to be interchangeable. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic and epidemiological, level III.


Asunto(s)
Escolaridad , Renta , Heridas y Traumatismos/terapia , Actividades Cotidianas , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Renta/estadística & datos numéricos , Puntaje de Gravedad del Traumatismo , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Reinserción al Trabajo/estadística & datos numéricos , Resultado del Tratamiento , Heridas y Traumatismos/complicaciones
7.
J Am Coll Surg ; 228(6): 871-877, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30711655

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Emergency general surgery (EGS) encompasses high-risk patients undergoing high-risk procedures. Admission source, particularly interhospital transfer, is rarely accounted for in clinical performance benchmarking. Our goal was to assess the impact of transfer status on outcomes after EGS. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective analysis of the American College of Surgeons NSQIP database (2005 to 2014). All inpatients that underwent 1 of 7 EGS procedures shown to represent 80% of EGS volume, complications, and mortality nationally were included. Admission source was classified as directly admitted vs transferred from an outside emergency department or an acute care facility. The primary outcomes were overall mortality, overall morbidity, and major morbidity. A 3:1 propensity score matched analysis was used to determine the association of admission source with outcomes. Subgroup analysis was performed for high- and low-risk EGS procedures. RESULTS: A total of 222,519 EGS admissions were identified, of which 15,232 (6.8%) were transfers. Mean age was 46 years and 51.4% were female. Overall mortality was 3.1% for the entire cohort and 10.8% within the transfer group. After propensity score matched analysis for 33 clinical and demographic variables, transferred patients had higher rates of overall mortality (odds ratio 1.01; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.02), higher overall morbidity (odds ratio 1.07; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.09), and major morbidity (odds ratio 1.06; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.08) compared with directly admitted patients. CONCLUSIONS: After rigorous risk adjustment, interhospital transfer status has a small effect on mortality and morbidity in the EGS population. This could suggest that it is reasonable to transfer patients and that regionalization of care should be encouraged.

8.
J Surg Res ; 235: 424-431, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30691824

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Understanding the mechanisms that lead to health-care disparities is necessary to create robust solutions that ensure all patients receive the best possible care. Our objective was to quantify the influence of the individual surgeon on disparate outcomes for minority patients undergoing an emergency general surgery (EGS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using the Florida State Inpatient Database, we analyzed patients who underwent one or more of seven EGS procedures from 2010 to 2014. The primary outcome was development of a major postoperative complication. To determine the individual surgeon effect on complications, we performed multilevel mixed effects modeling, adjusting for clinical and hospital factors, such as diagnosis, comorbidities, and hospital teaching status and volume. RESULTS: 215,745 cases performed by 5816 surgeons at 198 hospitals were included. The overall unadjusted complication rate was 8.6%. Black patients had a higher adjusted risk of having a complication than white patients (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.22). Surgeon random effects, when hospital fixed effects were held constant, accounted for 27.2% of the unexplained variation in complication risk among surgeons. This effect was modified by patient race; for white patients, surgeon random effects explained only 12.4% of the variability, compared to 52.5% of the variability in complications among black patients. CONCLUSIONS: This multiinstitution analysis within a single large state demonstrates that not only do black patients have a higher risk of developing a complication after undergoing EGS than white patients but also surgeon-level effects account for a larger proportion of the between-surgeon variation. This suggests that the individual surgeon contributes to racial disparities in EGS.


Asunto(s)
Complicaciones Posoperatorias/etnología , Cirujanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Tratamiento de Urgencia , Femenino , Florida/epidemiología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/etiología , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/efectos adversos
12.
J Surg Res ; 231: 62-68, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30278970

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Racial and socioeconomic disparities are well documented in emergency general surgery (EGS) and have been highlighted as a national priority for surgical research. The aim of this study was to identify whether disparities in the EGS setting are more likely to be caused by major adverse events (MAEs) (e.g., venous thromboembolism) or failure to respond appropriately to such events. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was undertaken using administrative data. EGS cases were defined using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes recommended by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. The data source was the National Inpatient Sample 2012-2013, which captured a 20%-stratified sample of discharges from all hospitals participating in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. The outcomes were MAEs, in-hospital mortality, and failure to rescue (FTR). RESULTS: There were 1,345,199 individual patient records available within the National Inpatient Sample. There were 201,574 admissions (15.0%) complicated by an MAE, and 12,006 of these (6.0%) resulted in death. The FTR rate was therefore 6.0%. Uninsured patients had significantly higher odds of MAEs (adjusted odds ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.19), mortality (1.28, 1.16-1.41), and FTR (1.20, 1.06-1.36) than those with private insurance. Although black patients had significantly higher odds of MAEs (adjusted odds ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.16), they had lower mortality (0.95, 0.90-0.99) and FTR (0.86, 0.80-0.91) than white patients. CONCLUSIONS: Uninsured EGS patients are at increased risk of MAEs but also the failure of health care providers to respond effectively when such events occur. This suggests that MAEs and FTR are both potential targets for mitigating socioeconomic disparities in the setting of EGS.


Asunto(s)
Servicios Médicos de Urgencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Fracaso de Rescate en Atención a la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Cirugía General/estadística & datos numéricos , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Adulto , Anciano , Grupos de Población Continentales , Femenino , Mortalidad Hospitalaria , Humanos , Cobertura del Seguro , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
13.
Surgery ; 164(5): 1109-1116, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30174142

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Hospital-level variation has been found to influence outcomes in emergency general surgery. However, whether the individual surgeon plays a role in this variation is unknown. METHODS: We performed an analysis of the Florida State Inpatient Database (2010-2014), which is linked to the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey Database, including patients who emergently underwent 1 or more of 7 procedures (laparotomy, adhesiolysis, small bowel resection, colectomy, repair of a perforated gastric ulcer, appendectomy, or cholecystectomy). We used multilevel random effects modeling to quantify the amount of variation in mortality, complications, and 30-day readmissions attributable to surgeons. Patient clinical and demographic factors, as well as hospital-level factors, were introduced into the model in a forward stepwise fashion, and the percent of the variation attributable to surgeons was derived. RESULTS: Our study included 2,149 surgeons across 224 hospitals, with a total of 569,767 emergency general surgery cases. The overall unadjusted mortality rate was 3.8%, and the complication and readmission rates were 12.7% and 27.7%, respectively. Surgeon-level variation had the greatest impact on mortality, explaining 32.77% of the overall variability in mortality risk compared with 0.08% and 2.28% for complications and readmissions, respectively. Peptic ulcer disease operations were most susceptible to surgeon-level variation in mortality and readmissions, whereas appendectomies and cholecystectomies were least susceptible to surgeon-level variation for all outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Surgeon-level variation contributes to a significant portion of mortality in EGS. This variation is most pronounced in surgery for peptic ulcer disease, a high-risk, low-frequency surgical condition. Programs to reduce mortality in emergency general surgery should address reducing variability in practice with attention to high-risk, low-frequency procedures.


Asunto(s)
Tratamiento de Urgencia/efectos adversos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Cirujanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/efectos adversos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Competencia Clínica , Tratamiento de Urgencia/mortalidad , Femenino , Florida/epidemiología , Mortalidad Hospitalaria , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Readmisión del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/etiología , Pautas de la Práctica en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/mortalidad , Tasa de Supervivencia
14.
Am J Surg ; 216(6): 1127-1128, 2018 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30224069

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: While advances in diagnosis and treatment of peptic ulcer disease have led to a decrease in hospital admissions the socioeconomic distribution of these benefits is unknown. METHODS: We designed a retrospective cohort study using the National Inpatient Sample from 2012 to 2013 including all patients that were admitted for peptic ulcer disease. We compared the types of ulcer related complications, the rates of intervention and the outcomes based on race and insurance status. RESULTS: Of 42,046 patients admitted for peptic ulcer disease 80.25% had an ulcer related complication. Black patients had the lowest rates of bleeding and highest rates of perforation and were less likely to undergo surgery for their complication but mortality was not different from white patients. Uninsured patients also had lower rates of bleeding and higher rates of perforation and they were at increased risk for death. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike other surgical conditions insurance status, not race, predicts mortality in peptic ulcer disease.


Asunto(s)
Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Europea/estadística & datos numéricos , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Úlcera Péptica/epidemiología , Úlcera Péptica/terapia , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Cobertura del Seguro , Seguro de Salud , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Úlcera Péptica/complicaciones , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores Socioeconómicos
15.
J Surg Res ; 229: 51-57, 2018 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29937016

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Benchmarking of mortality outcomes across the country has revealed major differences in survival based on the trauma center at which a patient receives care. The role of the individual surgeon in determining trauma outcomes is unknown. Most believe that differences in outcomes are primarily driven by system- and process-based variations. Our objective was to determine if variation in individual surgeon outcomes could help explain difference in survival after trauma. METHODS: Analysis of trauma patients in the Florida State Inpatient Database from 2010 to 2014. The presence of unique physician identifiers, in addition to hospital identifiers, rendered this data set ideal for performance of multilevel analysis. The amount of the variation attributable to surgeon-level variation was calculated using multilevel random-effects models controlling for patient clinical factors (such as injury severity and comorbidities/age) and hospital-level factors, such as case mix and bed size. RESULTS: There were 31 hospitals, 175 surgeons, and 65,706 admissions. The overall mortality rate was 5.6%. The average mortality rate across surgeons ranged from 0% to 17.4% (mean 0.4%, standard deviation 1.85). At the individual surgeon level, when controlling for clinical and hospital-level factors, 9% of this variation was attributable solely to the surgeon. CONCLUSIONS: At the state level, we found that differences in outcomes among trauma centers are impacted by individual surgeon-level variation. Implementation of protocolized, system-based trauma care is useful for improving the overall quality of care for injured patients but does not entirely negate surgeon-specific variations in management.


Asunto(s)
Hospitales/estadística & datos numéricos , Cirujanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Centros Traumatológicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Heridas y Traumatismos/mortalidad , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Benchmarking/estadística & datos numéricos , Competencia Clínica/normas , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Vías Clínicas/normas , Vías Clínicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Florida/epidemiología , Mortalidad Hospitalaria , Hospitales/normas , Humanos , Puntaje de Gravedad del Traumatismo , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cirujanos/normas , Tasa de Supervivencia , Resultado del Tratamiento , Heridas y Traumatismos/diagnóstico , Heridas y Traumatismos/cirugía , Adulto Joven
16.
J Surg Res ; 228: 281-289, 2018 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29907223

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Emergency general surgery (EGS) is characterized by high rates of morbidity and mortality. Though checklists and associated communication-based huddle strategies have improved outcomes, these tools have never been specifically examined in EGS. We hypothesized that use of an evidence-based communication tool aimed to trigger intraoperative discussion could improve communication in the EGS operating room (OR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a set of discussion prompts based on modifiable factors identified from previously published studies aimed to encourage all team members to speak up and to centralize awareness of patient disposition and intraoperative transfusion practices. This tool was pilot-tested using OR human patient simulators and was then rolled out to EGS ORs at an academic medical center. The perceived effect of our tool's implementation was evaluated through mixed-methodologic presurvey and postsurvey analysis. RESULTS: Preimplementation and postimplementation survey-based data revealed that providers reported the EGS-focused discussion prompts as improving team communication in EGS. A trend toward shared awareness of intraoperative events was observed; however, nurses described cultural impedance of discussion initiation. Providers described a need for further reinforcement of the tool and its indications during implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Use of a discussion-based communication tool is perceived as supporting team communication in the EGS OR and led to a trend toward improving a shared understanding of intraoperative events. Analyses suggest the need for enhanced reinforcement of use during implementation and improvement of team-based education regarding EGS. Furthermore work is needed to understand the full impact of this evidence-based tool on OR team dynamics and EGS patient outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia/métodos , Cuidados Intraoperatorios/métodos , Quirófanos/organización & administración , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Anestesiólogos/organización & administración , Anestesiólogos/psicología , Concienciación , Tratamiento de Urgencia/métodos , Humanos , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/organización & administración , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Proyectos Piloto , Cirujanos/organización & administración , Cirujanos/psicología
17.
Acute Med Surg ; 5(2): 119-122, 2018 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29657721

RESUMEN

Emergency General Surgery (EGS) patients represent a unique group of acutely ill surgical patients at high risk for death and complications. Since the inception of EGS as a surgical subspecialty in the early 2000s, there have been significant developments to further define the scope of EGS as well as to advance data collection, performance measurement, and quality improvement. This includes defining the EGS cohort by diagnosis and procedure and by overall burden, benchmarking of EGS outcomes, and creation of quality improvement programs aimed at reducing the excess morbidity and mortality associated with EGS. Going forward there exists a need for a more modern approach to quality improvement. This may include the creation of an EGS data registry, the use of electronic medical records data, wearable device technology, and a focus on patient reported outcomes.

18.
Am J Surg ; 216(3): 420-426, 2018 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29615192

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing Emergency General Surgery (EGS) have increased risk of complications and death. The risk of AKI in patients undergoing EGS, along with associated outcomes, is unknown. METHODS: This two-institution observational study included adults admitted to intensive care units between 1997 and 2012. EGS was defined by 7 procedures occurring within 48 hours of ICU admission. The main outcome studied was AKI within 5 days, along with 90-day mortality. RESULTS: In our cohort of 59,604 patients, 1758 (2.9%) underwent EGS. Risk of AKI in EGD patients was significantly increased relative to non-EGS patients, with adjusted odds of 1.7 (95%CI 1.40-1.94; P < 0.001). Risk of renal replacement for EGS patients was also increased, with odds of 1.8 (95%CI 1.37-2.46; P < 0.001). EGS patients were at significantly higher risk of 90-day mortality, with adjusted odds of 3.1 (95%CI 2.16-4.33,p < 0.001) for AKI and 4.5 (95%CI 2.58-7.96,p < 0.001) for AKI requiring renal replacement, relative to the absence of AKI. CONCLUSIONS: EGS is a robust risk factor for AKI in critically ill patients, the development of which is strongly predictive of increased 90-day mortality.


Asunto(s)
Lesión Renal Aguda/etiología , Enfermedad Crítica/mortalidad , Urgencias Médicas , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Medición de Riesgo , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/efectos adversos , Lesión Renal Aguda/mortalidad , Lesión Renal Aguda/terapia , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Terapia de Reemplazo Renal , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo , Tasa de Supervivencia/tendencias , Factores de Tiempo , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
19.
Am J Surg ; 216(5): 856-862, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29534818

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Emergency general surgery (EGS) is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality, and seven procedures account for 80% of the National burden of operative EGS. We aimed to characterize the excess morbidity and mortality attributable to these procedures based on the level of procedural risk. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS-NSQIP) database. (2005-2014). Seven EGS procedures were stratified as high risk and low risk. Primary outcomes were overall mortality, overall morbidity, major morbidity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed. RESULTS: There were 619,174 patients identified. Comparing EGS to non-EGS in high-risk cases the OR for overall mortality was 1.39(1.33,1.45), overall morbidity 1.07 (0.98, 1.16), and major morbidity 1.15(1.03,1,27). In low-risk cases the OR for overall mortality was 1.03 (0.89, 1.19) overall morbidity 1.35 (1.23, 1.48), and major morbidity 2.18(1.90, 2.50). CONCLUSIONS: Using a Nationally representative clinical database we identified significant heterogeneity in the outcomes of EGS depending on procedural risk. Risk stratification and benchmarking strategies need to account for the inherent heterogeneity of EGS.


Asunto(s)
Benchmarking/métodos , Urgencias Médicas , Cirugía General/normas , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Mejoramiento de la Calidad/normas , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/normas , Adulto , Anciano , Causas de Muerte/tendencias , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Morbilidad/tendencias , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
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