Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 7 de 7
Filtrar
Más filtros










Base de datos
Intervalo de año de publicación
1.
Clin Gerontol ; 43(1): 118-125, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31522623

RESUMEN

Objective: We describe the development and implementation of a telephonic intervention (SAVE-CLC) piloted at three VA sites for Veterans returning to the community from VA nursing facilities (Community Living Centers or "CLCs"). Care transitions present a known period of medical risk for older adults and may pose increased risk for suicide. Veterans discharging from CLCs are at elevated risk compared to age and gender matched controls.Methods: Using a quality improvement approach, input was gathered from key stakeholders to aid in the development of the intervention. Veterans were screened for depressive symptoms and need for additional support by phone.Results: Of the Veterans who received the SAVE-CLC intervention, 87.9% had at least one prior mental health diagnosis, though only 19.7% had an outpatient mental health appointment arranged at CLC discharge. Results suggest that the intervention is feasible across multiple outpatient settings and is generally well-received by Veterans and caregivers, with 97% of those contacted reporting that the telephone calls were helpful.Conclusion: This flexible, telephone-based intervention addresses the unmet need of integrating mental health care into discharge planning during care transitions.Clinical Implications: SAVE-CLC offers a feasible and acceptable solution to suicide risk in older Veterans exiting a CLC.

2.
Clin Gerontol ; 43(1): 104-109, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31096885

RESUMEN

Adults age 65 and older have high rates of suicide, despite recent efforts to reduce the suicide rate in this population. One suicide prevention strategy with burgeoning empirical support is safety planning; however, there is a lack of information and resources on safety planning for older adults to support uptake of this evidence-based practice in clinical settings where older adults are commonly seen. Safety plans can address risk factors for suicide in older adults, including social isolation, physical illness, functional limitations, and use of highly lethal means. Safety plans also promote relevant protective factors, including increasing use of coping strategies, social support, and help-seeking. Clinicians may encounter challenges and barriers to safety planning with older adults. This paper describes a collaborative, creative approach to safety planning that is relevant and useful for this vulnerable population. Using two case examples, we illustrate how to engage older adults in safety planning, including ways to minimize barriers associated with the aging process.

3.
J Palliat Care ; : 825859719851483, 2019 May 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31146630

RESUMEN

This article examines the intersection between masculinity, military culture, and hospice and palliative care (HPC). The authors conducted a narrative literature review, supplemented with clinical annotations, to identify the impact of masculinity and military culture on the following topics salient to end-of-life care with older male veterans: pain management, mental health, coping, communication, autonomy and respect, and family roles. Findings suggest that traits associated with masculinity and military culture have an influence on the end-of-life process and HPC for older male veterans. Specifically, results suggest that older male veterans may deny or minimize physical pain, decline mental health treatment, utilize maladaptive coping strategies, avoid emotional conversations, struggle to manage perceived shifts in autonomy, and experience challenges negotiating changing family roles. The authors provide clinical recommendations for providers across various disciplines to address the aforementioned concerns with older male veterans in HPC. Overall, information presented in this article may be an important contribution to the literature for building cultural competencies with older male veterans and has the potential to improve the delivery of HPC for veterans and their families.

4.
Gerontol Geriatr Educ ; : 1-9, 2019 Jun 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31173565

RESUMEN

Assessment of decision-making capacity of older adults is a growing area of practice but training opportunities are lacking. We present a needs assessment, program characteristics, pilot clinic process (n= 52 referrals) and outcome training (n= 4 interns) data for a capacity training clinic. Process data reveal that the training clinic provided consistent referrals (1 per week) across multiple capacity domains (independent living, treatment consent, and financial capacities), with 27% of referrals providing opportunities for training in protective services. Outcome data found three of the four interns reported proficient skills in capacity assessment, as well as improved skills in six areas related to capacity assessment: knowledge of limitations of assessment methods, person-environment interaction, identifying and applying ethical and legal standards, utilizing cognitive assessments, communicating results and recommendations, and assessing risk. The discussion shares lessons learned for the development of future training rotations and clinics in the capacity assessment.

5.
Gerontologist ; 58(2): e15-e24, 2018 03 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28499032

RESUMEN

Purpose of Study: To develop a structured observational tool, the Resident-centered Assessment of Interactions with Staff and Engagement tool (RAISE), to measure 2 critical, multi-faceted, organizational-level aspects of person-centered care (PCC) in nursing homes: (a) resident engagement and (b) the quality and frequency of staff-resident interactions. Design and Methods: In this multi-method psychometric development study, we conducted (a) 120 hr of ethnographic observations in one nursing home and (b) a targeted literature review to enable construct development. Two constructs for which no current structured observation measures existed emerged from this phase: nursing home resident-staff engagement and interaction. We developed the preliminary RAISE to measure these constructs and used the tool in 8 nursing homes at an average of 16 times. We conducted 8 iterative psychometric testing and refinement cycles with multi-disciplinary research team members. Each cycle consisted of observations using the draft tool, results review, and tool modification. Results: The final RAISE included a set of coding rules and procedures enabling simultaneously efficient, non-reactive, and representative quantitative measurement of the interaction and engagement components of nursing home life for staff and residents. It comprised 8 observational variables, each represented by extensive numeric codes. Raters achieved adequate to high reliability with all variables. There is preliminary evidence of face and construct validity via expert panel review. Implications: The RAISE represents a valuable step forward in the measurement of PCC, providing objective, reliable data based on systematic observation.


Asunto(s)
Envejecimiento/psicología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Técnicas de Observación Conductual/métodos , Hogares para Ancianos , Casas de Salud , Participación del Paciente , Calidad de Vida , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Evaluación Geriátrica/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Participación del Paciente/psicología , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Psicometría/métodos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
6.
J Appl Gerontol ; 37(3): 349-370, 2018 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27091880

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to identify structural, market, and administrator factors of nursing homes that are related to the implementation of person-centered care. Administrators of Medicare/Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the Deep South were invited to complete a standardized survey about their facility and their perceptions and attitudes regarding person-centered care practices (PCCPs). Nursing home structural and market factors were obtained from public websites, and these data were matched with administrator data. Consistent with the resource-based theory of competitive advantage, nursing homes with greater resources and more competition were more likely to implement PCCPs. Implementation of person-centered care was also higher in nursing homes with administrators who perceived culture change implementation to be feasible in their facilities. Given that there is a link between resource availability and adoption of person-centered care, future research should investigate the cost of such innovations.


Asunto(s)
Personal Administrativo , Actitud , Hogares para Ancianos/organización & administración , Cuidados a Largo Plazo/organización & administración , Casas de Salud/organización & administración , Atención Dirigida al Paciente/organización & administración , Adulto , Competencia Económica , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cultura Organizacional , Innovación Organizacional , Sudeste de Estados Unidos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
Clin Gerontol ; 41(5): 458-467, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29236623

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate a 12-session Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Older Veterans group protocol. METHODS: The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) quality improvement model was the foundational process for this project. Veterans age 55 years and older participated in an ACT for Older Veterans group in an outpatient geropsychology clinic at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Study methods included analysis of participant feedback gathered in a focus group, process measures (i.e., number of sessions attended and number of early terminations), and outcome measures (i.e., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and psychological flexibility). RESULTS: Seventeen participants completed an average of ten sessions. Less than 25% of participants terminated early. Depressive symptoms improved, though there were no statistically significant changes in anxiety symptoms and psychological flexibility. The focus group yielded several recommendations that were implemented in subsequent groups. CONCLUSIONS: The PDSA model helped in the development of a group therapy intervention that is both relevant and beneficial to older Veterans presenting with a variety of biopsychosocial issues. Results provide support for further research investigation of ACT for Older Veterans Group. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: ACT used in a group format is a feasible and acceptable psychotherapy for older Veterans.


Asunto(s)
Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso/normas , Ansiedad/terapia , Depresión/terapia , Psicoterapia de Grupo/métodos , Psicoterapia de Grupo/normas , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Veteranos/psicología , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Atención Plena , Desarrollo de Programa , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA