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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 278, 2019 Jul 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31340790

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of faculty members and academic administrators, at Qatar University College of Pharmacy, towards interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice by identifying enablers, barriers and resources needed to implement IPE within the pharmacy curriculum. METHODS: A qualitative methodology was employed using focus groups discussions. Two focus groups were conducted, one focus group with faculty members (n = 5) and another focus group with academic administrators (n = 5) at Qatar University College of Pharmacy. Focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim by an independent experienced transcriber and validated by the study principal researcher. Thematic analysis was undertaken to generate key themes and subthemes. RESULTS: The study participants highlighted a number of enablers and challenges encountered as a result of the initial IPE events, for integrating IPE into the pharmacy curriculum. Many provided recommendations and suggestions for effective implementation of IPE. Analysis of the results focused on three main categories: enablers, barriers and recommendations. Overall, seven major themes were identified: 1) intrinsic enabling factors (initial IPE experiences, cross-appointed faculty, accreditation); 2) extrinsic enabling factors (national policy & legislation and advances in pharmacists' role); 3) student related benefits (roles & responsibilities and agents for change); 4) student hindering factors (student engagement, perceptions & attitudes and gender issues); 5) partnering academic institutions (logistical issues, familiarity with other curricula and commitment); 6) practice environment (hierarchy, healthcare professionals' attitude and lack of collaborative practice) and 7) IPE delivery (dedicated structure, IPE curriculum and extrinsic support). CONCLUSION: Pharmacy academics had positive perceptions towards IPE suggesting a high level of support and readiness to pursue IPE and an opportunity for pharmacy academics to drive the IPE agenda forward in Qatar. However, a number of challenges were reported. These are important to consider to ensure the development of effective strategies for the integration and enhancement of IPE and collaborative practice.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Desarrollo de Programa , Curriculum , Grupos Focales , Farmacéuticos , Qatar , Investigación Cualitativa
2.
Nagoya J Med Sci ; 80(4): 465-473, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30587861

RESUMEN

To minimise the global burden of diabetes, the awareness of appropriate intervention methods for diabetes education and practice is essential. This project is the first international interprofessional education (IIPE) for the awareness of diabetes, with a focus on patient-centred care wherein three medical and four pharmacy students from Japan and one medical, two pharmacy, two nutrition and one occupational therapy (OT) student from Scotland participated. We described IIPE effects using interdisciplinary education perception scale (IEPS) before and after the programme among Scottish and Japanese students. University of Aberdeen/ Robert Gordon University and Nagoya University developed and established a shared online platform that provided knowledge to students on diabetes in both languages. We developed a case-based scenario that reflected diabetes care in each country using a standardised patient (SP). Lastly, a student-led live webinar was conducted on 14 November 2014 (the World Diabetes Day) to discuss and exchange care methods for SP. Each participating national team presented their care plan and all students discussed the diabetic care plan online. Both Japanese and Scottish teams were able to accurately assess the patient's condition and empathise with the SP. In conclusion, all participants learned that interprofessional collaboration was clearly required for diabetes management focused on patient-centred care. All participants appreciated the differences in the approach of the two countries involved because of the cultural- and health related differences. This programme was significant in raising awareness regarding the need for international interprofessional intervention on diabetes towards developing a model for live webinar IIPE.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Estudios Interdisciplinarios , Atención Dirigida al Paciente/métodos , Humanos , Japón , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Escocia , Difusión por la Web como Asunto
3.
Int J Clin Pharm ; 40(5): 1388-1401, 2018 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30051221

RESUMEN

Background Healthcare is provided by a variety of different professionals, including pharmacists who are integral members of the team, and all are expected to work collaboratively to provide quality care. Little is known about the perceptions of pharmacists in Qatar towards interprofessional collaboration. Positive attitudes towards interprofessional education are essential to successful implementation of interprofessional collaboration. Therefore, to develop effective collaboration strategies in practice settings, it was essential to survey the attitudes of practising pharmacists towards collaboration. Objective To explore the awareness, views, attitudes and perceptions of practising pharmacists in Qatar towards interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Setting Community, hospital and primary healthcare settings in Qatar. Methods This was a two-staged sequential explanatory mixed method design. It utilised a quantitative survey (Stage 1), based on a modified version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale. This was followed by a qualitative stage, utilising focus groups (Stage 2). Main outcome measures (1) Qatar pharmacists' attitudes towards interprofessional education and collaborative practice; (2) Practising pharmacists' perspectives in relation to enablers, barriers and recommendations regarding interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Results 63% of the practising pharmacists (n = 178) responded to the survey. Three focus groups followed (total n = 14). High scores indicating readiness and positive attitudes towards interprofessional education were reported for pharmacists working in hospital, community and primary healthcare settings. Qualitative analysis identified three overarching themes in relation to the enablers, barriers and recommendations for practising pharmacists working collaboratively. The enabling themes were: professional and patient related benefits, and current positive influences in Qatar; the barriers were patients' negative perceptions; the status of the pharmacy profession and current working practices and processes; the recommendations related to improving patients' perceptions about pharmacists and enhancing the status of pharmacy profession in Qatar. The findings from this study highlighted two major observations: the lack of existence of collaborative practice and hierarchy and power play. Conclusion Pharmacists demonstrated willingness and readiness to develop interprofessional learning and collaborative practice with significant steps already taken towards improving collaborative working practices in different care settings.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Servicios Farmacéuticos/organización & administración , Farmacéuticos/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Conducta Cooperativa , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Percepción , Qatar , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
4.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-15, 2018 Jul 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30052106

RESUMEN

In an IPE environment, students are expected to have better understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and contribution of other health care professions to enhance interprofessional working and collaboration with an end result of improving patient-centred and team-based care. Although many studies have investigated students' attitudes, very few employ a mixed methods design and hardly are from Middle Eastern countries. A two-staged sequential explanatory mixed method design was used to comprehensively capture the perspectives of pharmacy students toward IPE and collaborative practice. A quantitative survey was conducted as the first stage of the study, followed by an in-depth discussion of these perspectives through a qualitative phase by conducting two focus groups. For the quantitative surveys, the overall response rate was 102/132 (77%) for pharmacy students in Qatar. This was followed by two focus groups with a total of 27 participants from senior and junior students. In exploring the qualitative data, three main themes were identified in relation to the pharmacy students' perspectives. These were on the pharmacy students' perception on the enablers (professional related benefits, patient-related benefits and current positive influences), barriers (previous IPE experiences, educational related issues and current working practices and processes), and recommendations to implementing IPE and collaborative practice (future IPE and pharmacy profession). Overall, the results demonstrate a strong readiness and positive perception by pharmacy students toward IPE and collaborative practice. This study has highlighted different dimensions in pharmacy students' perceptions. It also provided a useful insight into the readiness of pharmacy students in a Middle Eastern university. Students are seeking more IPE experiences formally incorporated into their curriculum and hence educators should capitalise on these positive and enthusiastic attitudes to identify the most effective means for delivering IPE and inform curricula planning. Collaborative practice-ready graduates will produce better-educated professionals delivering higher quality care.

5.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 14(10): 863-882, 2018 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29132909

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Pharmacists are key professionals in the collaborative working process and are integral members of the healthcare team. However, there is paucity of information regarding their perspectives towards interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice. AIMS: The aim of this systematic review is to synthesise, summarise and evaluate the quality of the quantitative and qualitative literature related to the perspectives of pharmacy students, pharmacy faculty and practising pharmacists toward IPE and collaborative practice. The perspectives included their views, experiences and attitudes with a special focus on their perceived benefits and challenges in relation to IPE and collaborative practice. METHODS: An integrated mixed method systematic review was conducted. Four electronic databases were searched for articles published in English between 2000 and 2015. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of the studies. RESULTS: Twenty-nine articles were identified meeting the selection criteria from the first initial search of 8512 articles. Seventeen articles (59%) targeted pharmacy students, 11 articles (38%) focused on practising pharmacists and 1 study (3%) was related to pharmacy faculty. The majority of studies were conducted in the United States (n = 13), were published in the last five years (83%, n = 24) and employed quantitative methods (52%, n = 15). The two commonly used survey instruments to measure the perspectives were: different versions of the RIPLS (35%, n = 6) and the IEPS scale (35%, n = 6). Fourteen of the 29 studies were rated as low quality (MMAT = 25%), eight studies were rated as average quality (MMAT = 50%), four were rated as high quality (MMAT 75%) and three were rated as very poor quality (MMAT 0%). No studies were rated with 100% MMAT quality. Overall, the findings suggest that pharmacy students, practicing pharmacists and faculty valued interprofessional education and collaborative practice and had positive attitudes towards it. Five main findings have been identified from this review: heterogeneity in reporting IPE research, traditional professional image of the pharmacist, lack of longitudinal follow-up, lack of IPE research on faculty and paucity in mixed method studies in terms of quality and numbers. CONCLUSIONS: These findings will provide an opportunity to stakeholders and policy makers to develop and implement IPE activities that are meaningful, comprehensive and unique. Sustained efforts are required not just in undergraduate curricula but also in healthcare settings to improve and promote an interprofessional culture at individual and organisational level.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Conducta Cooperativa , Docentes , Humanos , Farmacias , Estudiantes de Farmacia
6.
J Interprof Care ; 30(6): 769-776, 2016 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27705033

RESUMEN

The current status of interprofessional education (IPE) in Arabic Middle Eastern countries is largely unexamined and there is a need to assess IPE and collaborative practice in these countries. As faculty attitudes towards IPE are believed to be one of the main factors that affect the successful integration of IPE into the different healthcare curricula, this article aims to explore the attitudes and views of pharmacy academics in Arabic-speaking Middle Eastern countries towards IPE and collaborative practice. The findings from this article are part of a larger study investigating pharmacy's perspectives of IPE and collaborative practice in Qatar and the Middle East. An online survey which included three validated scales was used to gather information from pharmacy academics at 89 pharmacy schools in 14 countries. The response rate was 107 out of 334 (32%) and the majority of the respondents were from Jordan, Qatar, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia. Statistical analysis was completed descriptively as well as inferentially using a series of independent t-tests. Overall pharmacy academics had positive attitudes towards IPE. The majority of the respondents, 90.8% (n = 99), perceived IPE to be important. Age, likelihood to engage in IPE, and years of IPE experience were the factors that were related to faculty members' attitudes towards IPE. Highly perceived barriers for implementing IPE included cultural challenges for each profession, scheduling common courses, and activities in addition to limited resources. The study findings indicated that pharmacy academics in the Middle East are ready to pursue IPE. These results can serve as impetus for implementing IPE in Middle Eastern countries.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Humanos , Líbano , Qatar , Estudiantes de Farmacia
7.
Br J Nurs ; 25(3): 138-43, 2016.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26878405

RESUMEN

Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians' attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful.


Asunto(s)
Transfusión Sanguínea/enfermería , Transfusión Sanguínea/normas , Errores Médicos/prevención & control , Sistemas de Identificación de Pacientes , Participación del Paciente , Seguridad del Paciente , Humanos
10.
J Interprof Care ; 29(3): 260-2, 2015 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25101519

RESUMEN

This report explores the relevance of gaming in IPE curriculum design with the use of the Interprofessional Education Game (iPEG) as an activity aimed to achieve positive interprofessional learning outcomes for students. It was designed to enable the understanding of professional roles and responsibilities in patient/client care settings. We provide a description of its implementation and evaluation with first year student cohorts (900+ per cohort) over a 3-year period within an established interprofessional education (IPE) programme. The game encapsulates fun and memorable learning styles to explore professional stereotypes and team approaches to care delivery. It can be a valuable teaching tool for those designing IPE curriculum. Evaluation data from students and staff were mainly positive. We discuss the use of the game and its potential to be adapted in flexible and creative ways to assist educators in consider incorporating gaming within their own IPE programmes.


Asunto(s)
Conducta Cooperativa , Juegos Recreacionales , Empleos en Salud/educación , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Aprendizaje , Rol Profesional , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud
11.
Clin Teach ; 9(1): 27-31, 2012 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22225889

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE) is perceived by many in health and social care education to reduce barriers between the professions. In Aberdeen there has been an IPE programme with Robert Gordon University and University of Aberdeen, and 10 health and social care courses since 2003. The steering groups reported to the Scottish Government in 2008. It was recommended that IPE should be extended from classroom-based learning experiences to practice-based learning experiences. METHODS: Replicating the same methodology, this study aimed to ascertain attitudinal change experienced by students undertaking IPE in clinical practice. Small groups in theatre and primary care were the pilot placement areas. The study design was a joint venture between the IPE research team and members of the clinical team. IPE activities were created for the specialities using adult learning and patient-centred approaches. RESULTS: Thirty-eight students from medicine, nursing and pharmacy were involved in the studies, and completed readiness for interprofessional learning scale (RIPLS) questionnaires before and after the course activity. There were 29 valid responses, showing a strong level of agreement for 14 out of 19 questions. The studies suggest that the IPE activities implemented had positive effects on the students' perceptions of interprofessional working. DISCUSSION: The implications are that IPE does not require large classroom-based activities to be successful. The study was successful in achieving its aims and learning outcomes for students in the two locations. It demonstrated that students can leave university better prepared for practice. There is a need for a rigorous longitudinal study to ensure tomorrow's health and social care workforce demonstrate graduate attributes in interprofessional working.


Asunto(s)
Empleos en Salud/educación , Estudios Interdisciplinarios/normas , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Empleos en Salud/normas , Humanos , Escocia
12.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 12(1): 52-9, 2012 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21664187

RESUMEN

Constructive alignment theory has been used to underpin the development of curricula in higher education for some time (Biggs and Tang, 2007), however, its use to inform and determine skills curricula in nursing is less well documented. This paper explores the use of constructive alignment theory within a study of undergraduate student nurses undertaking clinical skill acquisition in the final year of a BSc (Hons) Nursing course. Students were followed up as newly qualified nurses (NQN) (n = 58) to ascertain the impact of skill acquisition in this way. Comparisons were made with newly qualified nurses who did not participate in a constructively aligned curriculum. This mixed methods study reported skill identification within the immediate post-registration period and evaluated the constructively aligned curriculum as having positive benefits for NQNs in terms of confidence to practice. This was supported by preceptors' views. The study recommends two process models for nursing skills curriculum development and reports that constructive alignment is a useful theoretical framework for nurse educators.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Bachillerato en Enfermería/normas , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Curriculum/normas , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Psicología Educacional
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