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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 6271, 2022 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35428836

RESUMEN

Human movements are spontaneously attracted to auditory rhythms, triggering an automatic activation of the motor system, a central phenomenon to music perception and production. Cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) in the theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequencies has been used as an index of the synchronisation between cortical motor regions and the muscles. Here we investigated how learning to produce a bimanual rhythmic pattern composed of low- and high-pitch sounds affects CMC in the beta frequency band. Electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) from the left and right First Dorsal Interosseus and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis muscles were concurrently recorded during constant pressure on a force sensor held between the thumb and index finger while listening to the rhythmic pattern before and after a bimanual training session. During the training, participants learnt to produce the rhythmic pattern guided by visual cues by pressing the force sensors with their left or right hand to produce the low- and high-pitch sounds, respectively. Results revealed no changes after training in overall beta CMC or beta oscillation amplitude, nor in the correlation between the left and right sides for EEG and EMG separately. However, correlation analyses indicated that left- and right-hand beta EEG-EMG coherence were positively correlated over time before training but became uncorrelated after training. This suggests that learning to bimanually produce a rhythmic musical pattern reinforces lateralised and segregated cortico-muscular communication.


Asunto(s)
Corteza Motora , Electroencefalografía/métodos , Electromiografía/métodos , Mano/fisiología , Humanos , Corteza Motora/fisiología , Movimiento/fisiología , Músculo Esquelético/fisiología
2.
Front Neurosci ; 16: 779964, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35281511

RESUMEN

Listening to samba percussion often elicits feelings of pleasure and the desire to move with the beat-an experience sometimes referred to as "feeling the groove"- as well as social connectedness. Here we investigated the effects of performance timing in a Brazilian samba percussion ensemble on listeners' experienced pleasantness and the desire to move/dance in a behavioral experiment, as well as on neural processing as assessed via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants listened to different excerpts of samba percussion produced by multiple instruments that either were "in sync", with no additional asynchrony between instrumental parts other than what is usual in naturalistic recordings, or were presented "out of sync" by delaying the snare drums (by 28, 55, or 83 ms). Results of the behavioral experiment showed increasing pleasantness and desire to move/dance with increasing synchrony between instruments. Analysis of hemodynamic responses revealed stronger bilateral brain activity in the supplementary motor area, the left premotor area, and the left middle frontal gyrus with increasing synchrony between instruments. Listening to "in sync" percussion thus strengthens audio-motor interactions by recruiting motor-related brain areas involved in rhythm processing and beat perception to a higher degree. Such motor related activity may form the basis for "feeling the groove" and the associated desire to move to music. Furthermore, in an exploratory analysis we found that participants who reported stronger emotional responses to samba percussion in everyday life showed higher activity in the subgenual cingulate cortex, an area involved in prosocial emotions, social group identification and social bonding.

3.
Cereb Cortex ; 2022 Jan 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35029645

RESUMEN

When people interact with each other, their brains synchronize. However, it remains unclear whether interbrain synchrony (IBS) is functionally relevant for social interaction or stems from exposure of individual brains to identical sensorimotor information. To disentangle these views, the current dual-EEG study investigated amplitude-based IBS in pianists jointly performing duets containing a silent pause followed by a tempo change. First, we manipulated the similarity of the anticipated tempo change and measured IBS during the pause, hence, capturing the alignment of purely endogenous, temporal plans without sound or movement. Notably, right posterior gamma IBS was higher when partners planned similar tempi, it predicted whether partners' tempi matched after the pause, and it was modulated only in real, not in surrogate pairs. Second, we manipulated the familiarity with the partner's actions and measured IBS during joint performance with sound. Although sensorimotor information was similar across conditions, gamma IBS was higher when partners were unfamiliar with each other's part and had to attend more closely to the sound of the performance. These combined findings demonstrate that IBS is not merely an epiphenomenon of shared sensorimotor information but can also hinge on endogenous, cognitive processes crucial for behavioral synchrony and successful social interaction.

4.
Cereb Cortex ; 2021 Dec 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34965579

RESUMEN

Complex sequential behaviors, such as speaking or playing music, entail flexible rule-based chaining of single acts. However, it remains unclear how the brain translates abstract structural rules into movements. We combined music production with multimodal neuroimaging to dissociate high-level structural and low-level motor planning. Pianists played novel musical chord sequences on a muted MR-compatible piano by imitating a model hand on screen. Chord sequences were manipulated in terms of musical harmony and context length to assess structural planning, and in terms of fingers used for playing to assess motor planning. A model of probabilistic sequence processing confirmed temporally extended dependencies between chords, as opposed to local dependencies between movements. Violations of structural plans activated the left inferior frontal and middle temporal gyrus, and the fractional anisotropy of the ventral pathway connecting these two regions positively predicted behavioral measures of structural planning. A bilateral frontoparietal network was instead activated by violations of motor plans. Both structural and motor networks converged in lateral prefrontal cortex, with anterior regions contributing to musical structure building, and posterior areas to movement planning. These results establish a promising approach to study sequence production at different levels of action representation.

5.
Behav Brain Sci ; 44: e75, 2021 09 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34588045

RESUMEN

Despite acknowledging that musicality evolved to serve multiple adaptive functions in human evolution, Savage et al. promote social bonding to an overarching super-function. Yet, no unifying neurobiological framework is offered. We propose that oxytocin constitutes a socio-allostatic agent whose modulation of sensing, learning, prediction, and behavioral responses with reference to the physical and social environment facilitates music's social bonding effects.


Asunto(s)
Música , Oxitocina , Humanos , Aprendizaje
6.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci ; 376(1835): 20200325, 2021 10 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34420381

RESUMEN

Humans perceive and spontaneously move to one or several levels of periodic pulses (a meter, for short) when listening to musical rhythm, even when the sensory input does not provide prominent periodic cues to their temporal location. Here, we review a multi-levelled framework to understanding how external rhythmic inputs are mapped onto internally represented metric pulses. This mapping is studied using an approach to quantify and directly compare representations of metric pulses in signals corresponding to sensory inputs, neural activity and behaviour (typically body movement). Based on this approach, recent empirical evidence can be drawn together into a conceptual framework that unpacks the phenomenon of meter into four levels. Each level highlights specific functional processes that critically enable and shape the mapping from sensory input to internal meter. We discuss the nature, constraints and neural substrates of these processes, starting with fundamental mechanisms investigated in macaque monkeys that enable basic forms of mapping between simple rhythmic stimuli and internally represented metric pulse. We propose that human evolution has gradually built a robust and flexible system upon these fundamental processes, allowing more complex levels of mapping to emerge in musical behaviours. This approach opens promising avenues to understand the many facets of rhythmic behaviours across individuals and species. This article is part of the theme issue 'Synchrony and rhythm interaction: from the brain to behavioural ecology'.


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Encéfalo/fisiología , Periodicidad , Primates/fisiología , Estimulación Acústica , Animales , Señales (Psicología) , Humanos , Macaca/fisiología
7.
Neuroimage ; 238: 118209, 2021 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34051354

RESUMEN

People have a natural and intrinsic ability to coordinate body movements with rhythms surrounding them, known as sensorimotor synchronisation. This can be observed in daily environments, when dancing or singing along with music, or spontaneously walking, talking or applauding in synchrony with one another. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying accurately synchronised movement with selected rhythms in the environment remain unclear. Here we studied real and imagined sensorimotor synchronisation with interleaved auditory and visual rhythms using cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) to better understand the processes underlying the preparation and execution of synchronised movement. Electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG) from the finger flexors, and continuous force signals were recorded in 20 participants during tapping and imagined tapping with discrete stimulus sequences consisting of alternating auditory beeps and visual flashes. The results show that the synchronisation between cortical and muscular activity in the beta (14-38 Hz) frequency band becomes time-locked to the taps executed in synchrony with the visual and auditory stimuli. Dynamic modulation in CMC also occurred when participants imagined tapping with the visual stimuli, but with lower amplitude and a different temporal profile compared to real tapping. These results suggest that CMC does not only reflect changes related to the production of the synchronised movement, but also to its preparation, which appears heightened under higher attentional demands imposed when synchronising with the visual stimuli. These findings highlight a critical role of beta band neural oscillations in the cortical-muscular coupling underlying sensorimotor synchronisation.


Asunto(s)
Ritmo beta/fisiología , Corteza Cerebral/fisiología , Movimiento/fisiología , Músculo Esquelético/fisiología , Desempeño Psicomotor/fisiología , Estimulación Acústica , Adulto , Electroencefalografía , Electromiografía , Femenino , Humanos , Imaginación/fisiología , Masculino , Estimulación Luminosa , Adulto Joven
8.
Acta Psychol (Amst) ; 218: 103348, 2021 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34058671

RESUMEN

The ability to distinguish between an individual's own actions and those of another person is a requirement for successful joint action, particularly in domains such as group music making where precise interpersonal coordination ensures perceptual overlap in the effects of co-performers' actions. We tested the hypothesis that such coordination benefits from simultaneous integration and segregation of information about 'self' and 'other' in an experiment using a musical joint action paradigm. Sixteen pairs of individuals with little or no musical training performed a dyadic synchronization task on a pair of electronic music boxes. The relationship between pitches produced by paired participants (same vs. different) and the relationship between movement frequencies required to trigger synchronous tones (congruent vs. incongruent) were varied in a repeated measures design. The results indicate that interpersonal coordination was most accurate when sounds were different in pitch but movement frequency was congruent. Under other conditions, participants often drifted apart, resulting in poor coordination, especially with same sounds and incongruent movements across co-performers. These findings suggest that interpersonal coordination was facilitated when simultaneous self-other integration and segregation occurred across sensory modalities in an asymmetrical manner where pitch relations favoured segregation via auditory streaming while movement congruence favoured integration via visuo-motor coupling. Such self-other representational balance may enable co-performers to maintain autonomous control while attending, anticipating, and adapting to each other's timing when joint action requires precise temporal coordination.


Asunto(s)
Música , Humanos , Relaciones Interpersonales , Movimiento , Sonido
9.
Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci ; 16(5): 512-524, 2021 05 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33565593

RESUMEN

During joint action, the sense of agency enables interaction partners to implement corrective and adaptive behaviour in response to performance errors. When agency becomes ambiguous (e.g. when action similarity encourages perceptual self-other overlap), confusion as to who produced what may disrupt this process. The current experiment investigated how ambiguity of agency affects behavioural and neural responses to errors in a joint action domain where self-other overlap is common: musical duos. Pairs of pianists performed piano pieces in synchrony, playing either the same pitches (ambiguous agency) or different pitches (unambiguous agency) while electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded for each individual. Behavioural and event-related potential results showed no effects of the agency manipulation but revealed differences in how distinct error types are processed. Self-produced 'wrong note' errors (substitutions) were left uncorrected, showed post-error slowing and elicited an error-related negativity (ERN) peaking before erroneous keystrokes (pre-ERN). In contrast, self-produced 'extra note' errors (additions) exhibited pre-error slowing, error and post-error speeding, were rapidly corrected and elicited the ERN. Other-produced errors evoked a feedback-related negativity but no behavioural effects. Overall findings shed light upon how the nervous system supports fluent interpersonal coordination in real-time joint action by employing distinct mechanisms to manage different types of errors.


Asunto(s)
Encéfalo/fisiología , Música/psicología , Desempeño Psicomotor/fisiología , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Electroencefalografía , Potenciales Evocados , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Apófisis Mastoides , Persona de Mediana Edad , Tiempo de Reacción/fisiología
10.
J Exp Psychol Gen ; 150(2): 385-394, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32790462

RESUMEN

Because work songs are ubiquitous around the world, singing while working and performing a task with a coactor is presumably beneficial for both joint action and individual task performance. The present study investigated the impact of interpersonal rhythmic vocal interaction on interpersonal phase relations and on individual motor timing performance, which was evaluated by a synchronization-continuation paradigm requiring whole-body movement with or without visual contact. Participants repeated the syllable "tah" or remained silent in a manipulation of vocal interaction, and they were oriented toward or away from their partner to manipulate visual interaction. Results indicated the occurrence of spontaneous interpersonal coordination, evidenced by interpersonal phase relations that were closer to 0° and less variable when participants interacted both visually and vocally. At the individual level, visual interaction increased the variability of synchronization with the metronome but did not modulate the variability of continuation movements, whereas vocal interaction helped to decrease the variability of synchronization and continuation movements. Visual interaction therefore degraded individual movement timing while vocal interaction improved it. Communication via the auditory modality may play a compensatory role in naturalistic contexts where visual contact has potential destabilizing effects. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Relaciones Interpersonales , Movimiento/fisiología , Música , Desempeño Psicomotor/fisiología , Habla/fisiología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
11.
Hum Mov Sci ; 72: 102653, 2020 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32721371

RESUMEN

Interpersonal coordination is exemplified in ensemble musicians, who coordinate their actions deliberately in order to achieve temporal synchronisation in their performances. However, musicians also move parts of their bodies unintentionally or spontaneously, sometimes in ways that do not directly produce sound from their instruments. Musicians' movements-intentional or otherwise-provide visual signals to co-performers, which might facilitate temporal synchronisation. In large ensembles, a conductor also provides a visual cue, which has been shown to enhance synchronisation. In the present study, we tested how visual cues from a co-performer and a conductor affect processes of temporal anticipation, synchronisation, and ancillary movements in a sample of primarily non-musicians. We used a dyadic synchronisation drumming task, in which paired participants drummed to the beat of tempo-changing music. We manipulated visual access between partners and a virtual conductor. Results showed that the conductor improved synchronisation with the music, but synchrony with the music did not improve when partners could see each other. Temporal prediction was improved when partners saw the conductor, but not each other. Ancillary movements of the head were more synchronised between partners when they could see each other, and greater ancillary synchrony at beat-related frequencies of movement was associated with greater drumming synchrony. These results suggest that compatible audio-visual cues can improve intentional synchronisation, that ancillary movements are affected by seeing a partner, and that attended vs. incidental visual cues thus have partially dissociable effects on temporal coordination during joint action.


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva , Señales (Psicología) , Cabeza/fisiología , Movimiento , Música , Sonido , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Destreza Motora/fisiología , Visión Ocular , Adulto Joven
12.
J Cogn Neurosci ; 32(12): 2260-2271, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32662729

RESUMEN

Human rhythmic movements spontaneously synchronize with auditory rhythms at various frequency ratios. The emergence of more complex relationships-for instance, frequency ratios of 1:2 and 1:3-is enhanced by adding a congruent accentuation pattern (binary for 1:2 and ternary for 1:3), resulting in a 1:1 movement-accentuation relationship. However, this benefit of accentuation on movement synchronization appears to be stronger for the ternary pattern than for the binary pattern. Here, we investigated whether this difference in accent-induced movement synchronization may be related to a difference in the neural tracking of these accentuation profiles. Accented and control unaccented auditory sequences were presented to participants who concurrently produced finger taps at their preferred frequency, and spontaneous movement synchronization was measured. EEG was recorded during passive listening to each auditory sequence. The results revealed that enhanced movement synchronization with ternary accentuation was accompanied by enhanced neural tracking of this pattern. Larger EEG responses at the accentuation frequency were found for the ternary pattern compared with the binary pattern. Moreover, the amplitude of accent-induced EEG responses was positively correlated with the magnitude of accent-induced movement synchronization across participants. Altogether, these findings show that the dynamics of spontaneous auditory-motor synchronization is strongly driven by the multi-time-scale sensory processing of auditory rhythms, highlighting the importance of considering neural responses to rhythmic sequences for understanding and enhancing synchronization performance.


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva , Percepción del Tiempo , Estimulación Acústica , Dedos , Humanos , Movimiento
13.
Neurosci Lett ; 721: 134803, 2020 03 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32014517

RESUMEN

Sensorimotor synchronization is a general skill that musicians have developed to the highest levels of performance, including synchronization in timing and articulation. This study investigated neurocognitive processes that enable such high levels of performance, specifically testing the relevance of 1) motor resonance and sharing high levels of motor expertise with the co-performer, and 2) the role of visual information in addition to auditory information. Musicians with varying levels of piano expertise (including non-pianists) performed on a single piano key with their right hand along with recordings of a pianist who performed simple melodies with the left hand, synchronizing timing and articulation. The prerecorded performances were presented as audio-only, audio-video, or audio-animation stimuli. Double pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) was applied to test the contribution of the right dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), an area implicated in motor resonance with observed (left-hand) actions, and the contribution of the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS), an area known for multisensory binding. Results showed effects of dTMS in the conditions that included visual information. IPS stimulation improved synchronization, although this effect was found to reverse in the video condition with higher levels of piano expertise. dPMC stimulation improved or worsened synchronization ability. Level of piano expertise was found to influence this direction in the video condition. These results indicate that high levels of relevant motor expertise are required to beneficially employ visual and motor information of a co-performer for sensorimotor synchronization, which may qualify the effects of dPMC and IPS involvement.


Asunto(s)
Corteza Motora/fisiología , Música , Lóbulo Parietal/fisiología , Desempeño Psicomotor/fisiología , Estimulación Magnética Transcraneal/métodos , Percepción Visual/fisiología , Adolescente , Adulto , Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Música/psicología , Adulto Joven
14.
Psychol Res ; 84(3): 568-584, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30116886

RESUMEN

Human movements spontaneously entrain to auditory rhythms, which can help to stabilise movements in time and space. The properties of auditory rhythms supporting the occurrence of this phenomenon, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we investigate in two experiments the effects of pitch and tempo on spontaneous movement entrainment and stabilisation. We examined spontaneous entrainment of hand-held pendulum swinging in time with low-pitched (100 Hz) and high-pitched (1600 Hz) metronomes to test whether low pitch favours movement entrainment and stabilisation. To investigate whether stimulation and movement tempi moderate these effects of pitch, we manipulated (1) participants' preferred movement tempo by varying pendulum mechanical constraints (Experiment 1) and (2) stimulation tempo, which was either equal to, or slightly slower or faster (± 10%) than the participant's preferred movement tempo (Experiment 2). The results showed that participants' movements spontaneously entrained to auditory rhythms, and that this effect was stronger with low-pitched rhythms independently of stimulation and movement tempi. Results also indicated that auditory rhythms can lead to increased movement amplitude and stabilisation of movement tempo and amplitude, particularly when low-pitched. However, stabilisation effects were found to depend on intrinsic movement variability. Auditory rhythms decreased movement variability of individuals with higher intrinsic variability but increased movement variability of individuals with lower intrinsic variability. These findings provide new insights into factors that influence auditory-motor entrainment and how they may be optimised to enhance movement efficiency.


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Movimiento/fisiología , Percepción de la Altura Tonal/fisiología , Percepción del Tiempo/fisiología , Estimulación Acústica , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Música , Adulto Joven
15.
Psychol Res ; 84(8): 2196-2209, 2020 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31203454

RESUMEN

Humans spontaneously synchronize their movements with external auditory rhythms such as a metronome or music. Although such synchronization preferentially occurs toward a simple 1:1 movement-sound frequency ratio, the parameters facilitating spontaneous synchronization to more complex frequency ratios remain largely unclear. The present study investigates the dynamics of spontaneous auditory-motor synchronization at a range of frequency ratios between movement and sound, and examines the benefit of simple accentuation pattern on synchronization emergence and stability. Participants performed index finger oscillations at their preferred tempo while listening to a metronome presented at either their preferred tempo, or twice or three times faster (frequency ratios of 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3) with different patterns of accentuation (unaccented, binary or ternary accented), and no instruction to synchronize. Participants' movements were spontaneously entrained to the auditory stimuli in the three different frequency ratio conditions. Moreover, the emergence and stability of the modes of coordination were influenced by the interaction between frequency ratio and pattern of accentuation. Coherent patterns, such as a 1:3 frequency ratio supported by a ternary accentuation, facilitated the emergence and stability of the corresponding mode of coordination. Furthermore, ternary accentuation induced a greater gain in stability for the corresponding mode of coordination than was observed with binary accentuation. Together, these findings demonstrate the importance of matching accentuation pattern and movement tempo for enhanced synchronization, opening new perspectives for stabilizing complex rhythmic motor behaviors, such as running.


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva , Movimiento , Desempeño Psicomotor , Estimulación Acústica , Adulto , Femenino , Dedos , Humanos , Masculino , Sonido , Adulto Joven
16.
Neuroimage ; 206: 116303, 2020 02 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31654761

RESUMEN

Humans coordinate their movements with one another in a range of everyday activities and skill domains. Optimal joint performance requires the continuous anticipation of and adaptation to each other's movements, especially when actions are spontaneous rather than pre-planned. Here we employ dual-EEG and frequency-tagging techniques to investigate how the neural tracking of self- and other-generated movements supports interpersonal coordination during improvised motion. LEDs flickering at 5.7 and 7.7 Hz were attached to participants' index fingers in 28 dyads as they produced novel patterns of synchronous horizontal forearm movements. EEG responses at these frequencies revealed enhanced neural tracking of self-generated movement when leading and of other-generated movements when following. A marker of self-other integration at 13.4 Hz (inter-modulation frequency of 5.7 and 7.7 Hz) peaked when no leader was designated, and mutual adaptation and movement synchrony were maximal. Furthermore, the amplitude of EEG responses reflected differences in the capacity of dyads to synchronize their movements, offering a neurophysiologically grounded perspective for understanding perceptual-motor mechanisms underlying joint action.


Asunto(s)
Corteza Cerebral/fisiología , Conducta Cooperativa , Electroencefalografía , Neuroimagen Funcional , Actividad Motora/fisiología , Interacción Social , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Liderazgo , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
17.
Psychol Res ; 84(1): 81-87, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29344724

RESUMEN

Research has demonstrated that the human cognitive system allocates attention most efficiently to a stimulus that occurs in synchrony with an established rhythmic background. However, our environment is dynamic and constantly changing. What happens when rhythms to which our cognitive system adapted disappear? We addressed this question using a visual categorization task comprising emotional and neutral faces. The task was split into three blocks of which the first and the last were completed in silence. The second block was accompanied by an acoustic background rhythm that, for one group of participants, was synchronous with face presentations, and for another group was asynchronous. Irrespective of group, performance improved with background stimulation. Importantly, improved performance extended into the third silent block for the synchronous, but not for the asynchronous group. These data suggest that attentional entrainment resulting from rhythmic environmental regularities disintegrates only gradually after the regularities disappear.


Asunto(s)
Atención/fisiología , Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Cognición/fisiología , Estimulación Luminosa , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
18.
Psychol Res ; 84(1): 62-80, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29380047

RESUMEN

Motor simulation has been implicated in how musicians anticipate the rhythm of another musician's action to achieve interpersonal synchronization. Here, we investigated whether similar mechanisms govern a related form of rhythmic action: dance. We examined (1) whether synchronization with visual dance stimuli was influenced by movement agency, (2) whether music training modulated simulation efficiency, and (3) what cues were relevant for simulating the dance rhythm. Participants were first recorded dancing the basic Charleston steps paced by a metronome, and later in a synchronization task they tapped to the rhythm of their own point-light dance stimuli, stimuli of another physically matched participant or one matched in movement kinematics, and a quantitative average across individuals. Results indicated that, while there was no overall "self advantage" and synchronization was generally most stable with the least variable (averaged) stimuli, motor simulation was driven-indicated by high tap-beat variability correlations-by familiar movement kinematics rather than morphological features. Furthermore, music training facilitated simulation, such that musicians outperformed non-musicians when synchronizing with others' movements but not with their own movements. These findings support action simulation as underlying synchronization in dance, linking action observation and rhythm processing in a common motor framework.


Asunto(s)
Estimulación Acústica , Fenómenos Biomecánicos/fisiología , Relaciones Interpersonales , Actividad Motora/fisiología , Movimiento/fisiología , Música , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
19.
Cereb Cortex Commun ; 1(1): tgaa037, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34296106

RESUMEN

When listening to music, people often perceive and move along with a periodic meter. However, the dynamics of mapping between meter perception and the acoustic cues to meter periodicities in the sensory input remain largely unknown. To capture these dynamics, we recorded the electroencephalography while nonmusician and musician participants listened to nonrepeating rhythmic sequences, where acoustic cues to meter frequencies either gradually decreased (from regular to degraded) or increased (from degraded to regular). The results revealed greater neural activity selectively elicited at meter frequencies when the sequence gradually changed from regular to degraded compared with the opposite. Importantly, this effect was unlikely to arise from overall gain, or low-level auditory processing, as revealed by physiological modeling. Moreover, the context effect was more pronounced in nonmusicians, who also demonstrated facilitated sensory-motor synchronization with the meter for sequences that started as regular. In contrast, musicians showed weaker effects of recent context in their neural responses and robust ability to move along with the meter irrespective of stimulus degradation. Together, our results demonstrate that brain activity elicited by rhythm does not only reflect passive tracking of stimulus features, but represents continuous integration of sensory input with recent context.

20.
Cereb Cortex Commun ; 1(1): tgaa043, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34296112

RESUMEN

Human movements often spontaneously fall into synchrony with auditory and visual environmental rhythms. Related behavioral studies have shown that motor responses are automatically and unintentionally coupled with external rhythmic stimuli. However, the neurophysiological processes underlying such motor entrainment remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated with electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) the modulation of neural and muscular activity induced by periodic audio and/or visual sequences. The sequences were presented at either 1 or 2 Hz, while participants maintained constant finger pressure on a force sensor. The results revealed that although there was no change of amplitude in participants' EMG in response to the sequences, the synchronization between EMG and EEG recorded over motor areas in the beta (12-40 Hz) frequency band was dynamically modulated, with maximal coherence occurring about 100 ms before each stimulus. These modulations in beta EEG-EMG motor coherence were found for the 2-Hz audio-visual sequences, confirming at a neurophysiological level the enhancement of motor entrainment with multimodal rhythms that fall within preferred perceptual and movement frequency ranges. Our findings identify beta band cortico-muscular coupling as a potential underlying mechanism of motor entrainment, further elucidating the nature of the link between sensory and motor systems in humans.

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