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1.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 158(6): 799-806, 2020 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33010979

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Patients and parents want shorter treatment times, but it is unclear whether they would compromise outcome quality to shorten treatment. The purpose of this study was to compare orthodontists' and parents' perceptions of finished occlusion and their willingness to extend treatment time to achieve improved outcomes. The effects of elapsed treatment time and patient compliance were also investigated. METHODS: Parallel surveys for orthodontists (n = 1000) and parents (n = 750) displayed simulated treatment outcomes of well-aligned teeth with occlusions in 1 mm increments from 3 mm Class III to 3 mm Class II. Participants rated their preferences on a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100) and specified whether they would extend treatment, and for how long, to improve the occlusion. RESULTS: Two hundred thirty-three orthodontists (23%) and 243 parents (32%) responded. Despite differences between the scores given (P < 0.0001), both groups rated Class I occlusion most acceptable (mean VAS = 93.9 and 80.7, respectively) and 3 mm Class III malocclusion least acceptable (mean VAS = 25.9 and 40.9, respectively). Parents were willing to extend treatment more often and for a greater time than orthodontists to improve results (P < 0.0001). In addition, parents were less willing to terminate treatment early (P < 0.05). Both groups perceived existing outcomes as more acceptable if the patient was noncompliant (P < 0.05), but elapsed time in treatment had no significant effect on ratings. CONCLUSIONS: For outcomes with well-aligned teeth, orthodontists and parents agreed on what the most and least acceptable occlusal relationships were. To achieve better outcomes, parents were willing to extend treatment duration more often and for a greater time than were orthodontists. In addition, parents were less willing than orthodontists to terminate treatment early.


Asunto(s)
Maloclusión de Angle Clase III , Ortodoncia , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Oclusión Dental , Humanos , Ortodoncistas , Padres
2.
Prog Orthod ; 21(1): 39, 2020 Oct 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33078213

RESUMEN

AIM: To evaluate the maxillary dentition effects of the extrusion arch for anterior open bite (AOB) correction in mixed dentition patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen subjects with an initial mean age of 9.17 ± 1.03 years presenting with dentoalveolar AOB (mean - 1.28 ± 1.46 mm) and normal facial pattern (FMA = 25.76°) were treated with an extrusion arch. The mean treatment period was 7.79 ± 2.58 months. Lateral cephalograms and dental models were taken before (T0) and after the correction of AOB (T1). Data were analyzed using paired t test to evaluate differences between T0 and T1. For all tests, a significance level of P < .05 was used. RESULTS: All patients achieved positive overbite at T1, with a mean increase of 3.07 mm. The maxillary incisors extruded 1.94 mm. Retroclination of the maxillary incisors (- 6.15°) and an increase in the interincisal angle (5.57°) were observed. There was a significant decrease in the distance between the incisal edge of the maxillary incisors and the molars (- 2.21 mm). There was significant mesial tipping of the maxillary molar (- 11.49°). Significant reductions of overjet (- 1.65 mm), arch perimeter (- 3.02 mm), and arch length (- 2.23 mm) were noted. The transverse maxillary intermolar distance did not change significantly. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a maxillary extrusion arch was effective in the treatment of AOB. Overbite increased due to incisor extrusion, as well as retroinclination and overjet reduction. However, side effects, such as mesial molar tipping and decreases in arch perimeter and length might occur.


Asunto(s)
Maloclusión de Angle Clase II , Mordida Abierta , Cefalometría , Niño , Dentición Mixta , Humanos , Mordida Abierta/terapia , Estudios Prospectivos
3.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 158(1): 84-91, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32448566

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a publicly available facial recognition application program interface to calculate similarity scores for presurgical and postsurgical photographs of patients who underwent orthognathic surgeries. Our primary objective was to identify which surgical procedure(s) had the greatest effect(s) on the similarity score. METHODS: Existing photographs for 25 orthodontic-orthognathic patients were analyzed using the application program interface to calculate similarity scores between the presurgical and postsurgical photographs. Photographs from 2 presurgical timepoints were compared as controls. Both relaxed and smiling photographs were included to assess the added impact of a facial pose. Patient characteristics and surgery types were recorded for statistical analysis. Nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum tests were performed to analyze the relationship between patient characteristics and similarity scores. Multiple comparisons Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were performed on the statistically significant characteristics. RESULTS: Recognition scores were significantly lower after orthognathic surgery at rest (P = 0.009) and smiling (P <0.001). Patients receiving both LeFort I and bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) surgeries had a lower median similarity score compared with those that received only BSSO (P = 0.009) when comparing relaxed photographs before and after surgery. Similarly, for the score comparing presurgical relaxed photographs to postsurgical smiling photographs, patients that received both surgeries were found to have lower similarity scores compared with those receiving only BSSO (P = 0.036). CONCLUSIONS: Two-jaw surgeries were associated with a statistically significant decrease in similarity score when compared with 1-jaw procedure. Pose was also found to be a factor influencing similarity scores, especially when comparing presurgical relaxed photographs to postsurgical smiling photographs.


Asunto(s)
Reconocimiento Facial , Cirugía Ortognática , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Ortognáticos , Algoritmos , Huesos Faciales , Humanos
5.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 157(4): 526-532.e2, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32241359

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate the factors that influence potential orthodontic patients choosing an orthodontist, general dentist, or direct-to-consumer (DTC) aligners for their treatment, and to determine the level of interest in each provider type. METHODS: An electronic survey was administered to 249 adults among the general population in the United States to determine and evaluate the level of interest in pursuing orthodontic treatment with each provider type. RESULTS: When asked their preference for provider type, 44% of respondents selected orthodontist, 34% selected DTC aligners, and 22% selected general dentist. Among respondents with the highest level of interest in pursuing orthodontic treatment, 50% selected orthodontist, and 27% selected DTC aligners (P = 0.002). For respondents with a moderate interest in pursuing treatment, only 21% selected orthodontist, and 48% selected DTC aligners (P = 0.002). The biggest perceived advantage of treatment with orthodontists was the quality of treatment, and for DTC aligners, it was convenience, followed by cost. Among adults with children, 34% selected DTC aligners for themselves, and only 16% selected DTC aligners when selecting for their children (P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: There is a high level of interest among adults in pursuing treatment with both orthodontists and DTC aligners. Patients with the highest level of interest in pursuing orthodontic care tend to prefer orthodontists, whereas those with a moderate interest in pursuing treatment prefer DTC aligners. Patients tend to select orthodontists primarily because of treatment quality, whereas they select DTC aligners for convenience and then cost. Parents tend to select an orthodontist for their child's treatment, even when selecting DTC aligners for themselves.


Asunto(s)
Atención Odontológica , Ortodoncistas , Adulto , Niño , Humanos , Padres , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
Angle Orthod ; 89(6): 847-854, 2019 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31306077

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of two common methods of overbite reduction on smile esthetics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective clinical trial was conducted with 32 patients in whom overbite reduction was achieved using a maxillary incisor intrusion arch (18 patients) or flat anterior bite plate (14 patients). Clinical and cephalometric records were compared pretreatment (T1), after overbite reduction (T2), and posttreatment (T3). RESULTS: Both treatment groups experienced a reduction in overbite and maxillary and mandibular incisor proclination during treatment (T1-T3). The center of resistance of the maxillary incisor and the incisal edge was significantly intruded in the intrusion arch group during overbite reduction (T1-T2). However, most of the intrusion of the center of resistance was lost by the end of treatment (T2-T3). Both treatment groups experienced a reduction in maxillary incisor display and flattening of the smile arc during overbite reduction. CONCLUSIONS: Both overbite reduction methods caused a decrease in incisor display and flattening of the smile arc. Smiles were improved in some patients by the end of treatment. However, reduction in incisor display persisted. Clinicians should take precautions to prevent negative effects of overbite reduction.


Asunto(s)
Estética Dental , Maloclusión de Angle Clase II , Sobremordida , Cefalometría , Humanos , Maxilar , Estudios Prospectivos , Técnicas de Movimiento Dental
7.
Angle Orthod ; 89(5): 727-733, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30888840

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the reliability and accuracy of a monitoring system in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with a rapid maxillary expander. Specifically, the amount of tooth movement calculated by the software was compared with the actual measurements taken on plaster models obtained during an in-office visit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients took intraoral video scans using the monitoring software's smartphone application (Dental Monitoring, Paris, France), immediately followed by impressions for plaster models. Intercanine and intermolar width measurements were calculated by the software and compared with those made on the plaster models. Data were analyzed using two one-sided t-tests for equivalence with equivalence bounds of ±0.5 mm. The significance level was set at .05. RESULTS: Thirty sets of measurements were compared. The intercanine and intermolar measurement differences were on average 0.17 mm and -0.02 mm, respectively, and were deemed equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: The monitoring software seems to provide an accurate assessment of linear tooth movements.


Asunto(s)
Modelos Dentales , Técnica de Expansión Palatina , Teléfono Inteligente , Humanos , Imagenología Tridimensional , Maxilar , Proyectos Piloto , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
8.
Prog Orthod ; 20(1): 10, 2019 Mar 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30854613

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To evaluate differences between orthodontists and general dentists in experience with clear aligners (CA), patients' demand and perception, types of patients, and malocclusion treated with CA and to compare the two groups of clinicians not using CA in their practice. METHODS: A Web-based survey was developed and sent to the 129 members of the European Aligner Society and randomly to 200 doctors of dental surgery by e-mail. They responded on demographics and to one of two different parts for clinicians using CA or not using CA. Statistical analysis was performed with SAS EGv.6.1. RESULTS: The response rate was 74%. Among the total of respondents, the majority reported utilizing CA in their practice with a greater percentage of orthodontists (P = 0.0040). Overall, orthodontists learned more about CA during academic seminars comparing to general dentists, and they treated more class I with crowding (P = 0.0002) and with open bite (P = 0.0462). The majority of patients treated with CA were female and adults with a full-time employment, and the patients' knowledge about CA treatment was mainly provided by information from external media advertising. For respondents not using CA, orthodontists were more likely to report that CA limit treatment outcomes, whereas general practitioners were reported not having enough experience to use them. CONCLUSIONS: There were some significant differences between orthodontists and general dentists mainly in experience and case selection for clinicians using CA as well as in the reasons provided for not using CA in their practice.


Asunto(s)
Odontología , Aparatos Ortodóncicos Removibles , Ortodoncia , Técnica de Expansión Palatina , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
9.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 154(5): 657-663, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30384936

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to investigate the eruption pattern of maxillary permanent canines in the alveolar cleft area after secondary alveolar bone grafting and to assess the risk indicators for canine impaction. METHODS: The sample consisted of 75 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate who underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting with rhBMP-2 with a mean age of 9.8 years of age at 1 center. A split-mouth study design was used, with the noncleft hemiarch comprising the control group. Panoramic radiographs taken before, immediately after, and 1 year after secondary alveolar bone grafting were used to assess the following parameters in both cleft side (CS) and noncleft side: canine mesiodistal angulation, canine height relative to the occlusal plane, canine mesial displacement, and superimposition with the neighboring maxillary incisors. The frequency of associated dental anomalies was compared between patients with and without CS canine impaction. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance, t tests, Fisher tests, and multiple logistic regression analysis (P <0.05). RESULTS: On the CS, maxillary canines were usually more mesially angulated and more distant from the occlusal plane compared with the noncleft side. The prevalences of canine impaction on the CS and noncleft side were 24% and 1.3%, respectively. Maxillary impacted canines on the CS demonstrated increased mesiodistal angulation and height at all time points. No association between CS canine impaction and mesial displacement (sectors) was found. An increased prevalence of lateral incisor agenesis on the CS was observed in the subgroup with canine impaction. CONCLUSIONS: Increased mesial angulation and lateral incisor agenesis on the CS are early risk indicators for maxillary canine impaction in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.


Asunto(s)
Injerto de Hueso Alveolar/efectos adversos , Labio Leporino/cirugía , Fisura del Paladar/cirugía , Diente Canino/fisiología , Complicaciones Posoperatorias , Erupción Dental , Diente Impactado/etiología , Injerto de Hueso Alveolar/métodos , Anodoncia/patología , Proteína Morfogenética Ósea 2/administración & dosificación , Niño , Diente Canino/diagnóstico por imagen , Diente Canino/patología , Femenino , Humanos , Incisivo/patología , Masculino , Radiografía Panorámica , Proteínas Recombinantes/administración & dosificación , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo , Diente Impactado/diagnóstico por imagen , Factor de Crecimiento Transformador beta/administración & dosificación
10.
Angle Orthod ; 88(6): 669-671, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30379587
11.
Turk J Orthod ; 31(2): 32-36, 2018 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30112512

RESUMEN

Objective: The aim of this study was to use three-dimensional images to determine the presence of upper lip asymmetry at rest and during smiling in a group of individuals with no history of orthodontics or facial cosmetic surgery. Methods: Standardized three-dimensional frontal resting and smiling images of 54 volunteers were analyzed using the 3dMDvultus software (3dMD, Atlanta, GA). Measurements were made from the soft tissue nasion, ipsilateral ala, subnasale, and menton to the right and left commissures of the lip. A 2.5 mm or greater difference between the right and left sides was defined as an asymmetry. The agreement on the presence or absence of asymmetry between the subjects' states of rest and smiling was determined by the McNemar's chi-squared test. Statistical significance was defined as p<0.05. Results: Menton was the most stable facial landmark to evaluate the upper lip symmetry at rest and during smiling (p=0.002). Using menton as a landmark, only one of the 54 subjects showed asymmetry while resting, but 12 (22%) showed asymmetry when smiling. Conclusion: As part of treatment planning for orthodontics or orthognathic surgery, patients should be evaluated for the upper lip symmetry during resting and smiling. The presence of asymmetry during smiling is a significant clinical problem that needs to be recognized so that patients can be informed about the effect it can have on the final esthetic result.

12.
J Orthod ; 45(4): 275-282, 2018 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30024348

RESUMEN

Digital dental technology is increasingly becoming an integral part of the modern orthodontic practice. The accuracy of digitally articulated models is critical when developing orthodontic treatment plans. OBJECTIVE: to determine the accuracy of model articulation generated by extraoral and intraoral scanners. DESIGN: One extraoral scanner with a wax (EOW) or vinyl polysiloxane bite registration (EOVPS), and three intraoral digital scanners utilizing confocal static (IOCS), confocal continuous (IOCC), and blue LED light technologies (IOLED) were used. METHODS: On each scanned image (n = 25 per group), measurements between the maxillary and mandibular molars and canines were performed and then compared to the gold standard values. A deviation of ± 0.5 mm from the gold standard value was considered acceptable. The significance level was kept at 0.05. RESULTS: IOCS and IOCC were accurate for all six interarch measurements. IOLED and EOVPS groups produced the next most accurate articulation of the digital models. EOW group resulted in the least accurate articulation. Also, of the software platforms used, the OrthoCAD™ was found to be the most accurate system for making measurements on digital casts. CONCLUSIONS: Only the scanners with the confocal imaging technology produced accurately articulated models. Differences between the scanners may be related to measurement errors inherent to the technologies employed and the software systems used to process the images.


Asunto(s)
Maxilar , Tecnología Odontológica , Diseño Asistido por Computadora , Técnica de Impresión Dental , Modelos Dentales , Imagenología Tridimensional , Registro de la Relación Maxilomandibular , Diente Molar
13.
Angle Orthod ; 88(1): 35-44, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29099236

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To measure the changes in tooth mobility, alveolar bone, and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during orthodontic treatment to regain incisal function in the presence and absence of biting exercises. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six females (42.3 ± 6.5 years old) with periodontally compromised upper incisors received orthodontic treatment to obtain ideal incisor relationships. Eighteen subjects in the experimental biting exercise group were instructed to bite a soft plastic roll for 5 min/d; the 18 control subjects were not given plastic rolls. Alveolar bone thickness, height, and density around the upper incisors were assessed at three root levels using cone-beam computed tomography. GCF was collected at the labial and palatal sites of the upper incisors at pretreatment (T0), end of treatment (T1), 1 month after T1 (T2), and 7 months after T1 (T3). RANKL/OPG was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Labial and palatal bone thickness significantly increased (>twofold) from T1 to T3 in the experimental group at all three root levels (all P < .05). Bone thickness correlated negatively with RANKL/OPG ratio between T1 and T2 ( P < .05). Tooth mobility, bone height, and density were not significantly different between T1 and T3. CONCLUSIONS: Biting exercises significantly increased bone thickness but did not affect tooth mobility, bone height, or density. The RANKL/OPG ratio decreased 1 month after treatment (T2) and correlated with increased bone thickness. ( ClinicalTrials.in.th TCTR20170625001).


Asunto(s)
Pérdida de Hueso Alveolar/terapia , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Líquido del Surco Gingival/química , Incisivo , Osteoprotegerina/metabolismo , Periodontitis/complicaciones , Periodontitis/terapia , Ligando RANK/metabolismo , Movilidad Dentaria/terapia , Adulto , Pérdida de Hueso Alveolar/diagnóstico por imagen , Tomografía Computarizada de Haz Cónico , Femenino , Humanos , Incisivo/diagnóstico por imagen , Maxilar , Movilidad Dentaria/diagnóstico por imagen , Resultado del Tratamiento
14.
Angle Orthod ; 88(1): 58-66, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29083225

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To compare alveolar bone thickness and height changes between untreated incisors (control), incisors advanced with light-force tipping, and incisors advanced with bodily movement mechanics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three subjects (aged 9.49 ± 1.56 years) with anterior crossbite were allocated into an untreated group (control), tipping group, or bodily movement group. Lateral cephalograms were taken before advancement (T0) and after obtaining normal overjet (T1). Changes in labial and palatal alveolar bone thickness and height surrounding maxillary incisors were evaluated with limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography before advancement (CT0) and 4 months after normal overjet was obtained (CT1). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA tests were used to compare changes within and between groups, as appropriate. The significance level was set at .05. RESULTS: Labial alveolar bone thickness at the midroot and apical levels were significantly decreased in the bodily movement group ( P < .05). However, between groups, there was no statistically significant difference in labial bone thickness changes at any level. Palatal and total alveolar bone thickness at the midroot and apical levels were significantly decreased in the tipping group compared with the control and bodily movement groups ( P < .05). Neither labial nor palatal bone height changes were significantly different among groups. CONCLUSIONS: Maxillary incisor advancement with light-force tipping and bodily movement in growing patients resulted in labial alveolar bone thickness and labial and palatal alveolar bone height changes that were similar to the untreated group.


Asunto(s)
Proceso Alveolar/diagnóstico por imagen , Maloclusión/diagnóstico por imagen , Maloclusión/terapia , Maxilar/diagnóstico por imagen , Técnicas de Movimiento Dental/métodos , Fenómenos Biomecánicos , Cefalometría , Niño , Tomografía Computarizada de Haz Cónico , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
15.
Angle Orthod ; 87(6): 926, 2017 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29120243
16.
J Clin Orthod ; 51(9): 536-539, 2017 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29130910
18.
Dental Press J Orthod ; 22(3): 26-40, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28746485

RESUMEN

There are so many compliments to Dr. Steven Lindauer that is hard for one to figure where to start from… Well, travelling backwards in time, all the way to the year 2000, I went to Virginia to study English at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), in Richmond, Virginia, USA. During my daily walks to the English school, I used to pass by the School of Dentistry, where the Department of Orthodontics was. That was the place where my very first "contact" with the VCU happened. In 2015, 15 years later, I had the pleasure to go back to the VCU and spend two days with Dr. Steven Lindauer. I have to confess that I was anxious and nervous to get to know not only the Chair of the Department, but also the Editor-in-chief of "The Angle Orthodontist". Since the very first moment I could experience how incredibly positive and pro-active the environment within the Department was. Staff members, Residents and Faculty members used to work very gladly and in perfect synergy. After a quick chat with the residents, I heard from them: "Dr. Lindauer is an unprecedented human being! Besides a brilliant Professor, Researcher and Administrator, he is like a father to all of us!" Besides this touching testimony, I also heard flattering compliments from workmates to the great friend, leader and partner Dr. Lindauer was. Here goes some food for thought, though. Unfortunately, the leader is often compelled to resort to unpopular measures in order to enforce compliance. Dr Lindauer is the living proof that a boss, a leader, can be a light, humble, friendly and highly charismatic human being. In 2016, I was given a second chance to enjoy Dr. Lindauer's company when he visited Brazil as a guest lecturer in Salvador, at the Federal University of Bahia and the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics (Bahia Chapter). I noticed, once again, that besides an excellent lecturer and careful clinician, he mastered orthodontic mechanics very proficiently. And needless to say at length about his brilliance ahead of "The Angle Orthodontist"... It didn't take me long to realize that his virtues by far exceeded the boundaries of the professional domain. Despite his utterly busy schedule, he is still able to dedicate time to his parents, taking them to trips around the world. Interestingly, at every international trip, he always remembers his puppies (Memphis, Baxter and Kingston - in memoriam), taking sightseeing pictures to immediately Photoshop them into. Having done the well deserved introductions to our distinguished interviewee, I would like to offer righteous acknowledgements to the colleagues Jorge Faber, David Turpin, Bhavna Shroff and David Normando, for having accepted the invitation to take part in this interview. I also would like to offer my heartfelt thanks to Dental Press for having entrusted me with the honor to conduct this project. I wish all readers as delightful and rich of an experience when going through this interview as it's been the scientific path that brought us all here in the first place. No doubts, you stand in face of a life dedicated to Orthodontics. (Andre Wilson Machado, interview coordinator).


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/historia , Ortodoncia/educación , Ortodoncia/historia , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Humanos , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/historia , Estados Unidos
20.
Angle Orthod ; 87(3): 377-383, 2017 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28059576

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To examine the orthodontic patient experience having braces compared with Invisalign by means of a large-scale Twitter sentiment analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A custom data collection program was created that collected tweets containing the words "braces" or "Invisalign" for a period of 5 months. A hierarchal Naïve Bayes sentiment analysis classifier was developed to sort the tweets into five categories: positive, negative, neutral, advertisement, or not applicable. Each category was then analyzed for specific content. RESULTS: A total of 419,363 tweets applicable to orthodontics were collected. Users posted significantly more positive tweets (61%) than they did negative tweets (39%; P ≤ .0001). There was no significant difference in the distribution of positive and negative sentiment between braces and Invisalign tweets (P = .4189). Positive orthodontics-related tweets often highlighted gratitude for a great smile accompanied with selfies. Negative orthodontic tweets frequently focused on pain. CONCLUSION: Twitter users expressed more positive than negative sentiment about orthodontic treatment with no significant difference in sentiment between braces and Invisalign tweets.


Asunto(s)
Tirantes , Aparatos Ortodóncicos Removibles , Ortodoncia Correctiva/instrumentación , Satisfacción del Paciente , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Teorema de Bayes , Humanos
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