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1.
J Addict Nurs ; 30(4): 235, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800511
2.
Nurse Educ ; 2019 Oct 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31634219

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The use of substances including alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs increases the risk for injury, noncommunicable disease, and premature death and contributes to the global burden of disease. PROBLEM: The morbidity and mortality rates among patients with at-risk substance use point to the need for future nurses to have the requisite knowledge and competencies to provide care for this population. APPROACH: This article provides guidance for nurse educators in designing curricula that include content related to substance use, including screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment. OUTCOMES: Expected outcomes for baccalaureate, master's, and doctor of nursing practice programs are informed by the corresponding American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials. CONCLUSION: The overall goal of this guidance for nursing education is to advance the knowledge and competencies of the future nursing workforce to address the continuum of substance use and improve the health of the nation.

3.
Subst Abus ; : 1-9, 2019 Oct 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31638876

RESUMEN

Over the past two decades, there has shift from focusing on the most severe end of the substance use continuum to earlier detection of persons who are at risk given the consequences associated with alcohol and other drug use. In 2017, the Association for Multidisciplinary Education and Research in Substance Use and Addiction (AMERSA) undertook the development of core competencies for specific disciplines addressing substance use in the 21st century. This article presents the core competencies for nursing in accord with the 16 standards of practice and performance for nursing. The competencies for the registered nurse and the advanced practice nurse are intended to inform and guide nursing practice with a focus on prevention, intervention, treatment, and recovery supports for persons who are affected by substance.

4.
J Addict Nurs ; 30(3): 135, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31478959
5.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 40(7): 621-625, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31045467

RESUMEN

Women of reproductive age who are drinking alcohol and not using effective contraception are at-risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy, which could result in a child with a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Nurses are an important partner in addressing at-risk alcohol use. It is imperative for alcohol education to be incorporated into nursing curricula so that future nurses have the tools to identify at-risk alcohol use. Three universities have worked together to create Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: A Toolkit. This toolkit was designed for nurses to facilitate the recognition and prevention of FASD and address gaps that exists around alcohol use.

6.
Geriatr Nurs ; 40(6): 553-557, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31036404

RESUMEN

Approximately 40% of older adults drink alcohol. Older adults living in community care residences are a vulnerable population at risk for alcohol use related problems especially for those age 65 years and older who are taking medications, have health problems, and have risky alcohol consumption. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based approach for individuals at risk for alcohol use disorders. A quality improvement project evaluated SBIRT education effects on nursing staff knowledge and attitudes related to alcohol use, and resident alcohol use. The staffs' SBIRT knowledge and alcohol related attitudes increased significantly. The staff documented SBIRT intervention 231 times in three months' post training.

7.
Can J Nurs Res ; : 844562119840172, 2019 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30947519

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Interprofessional education strategies are becoming more prevalent as nursing schools integrate interprofessional practice activities into their curricula. PURPOSE: This paper presents the results of a federally funded project to deliver online interprofessional education to nursing students on screening for alcohol and substance use in rural areas, in which their perceptions about interprofessional education were measured. METHODS: A quasi-experimental within-subjects repeated measures design was utilized. Students in the bachelor or associate degree program were recruited from two rural nursing schools. A demographic questionnaire, Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Questionnaire, Drug and Drug Problems Questionnaire, and Interprofessional Education Perception Scale were utilized. General linear modeling was used to determine changes in these measurements over time. Data collection was performed at pretraining, posttraining, and following an online interprofessional dialogue. RESULTS: The study consisted of 89 nursing students. The participants were 87% female (n = 77/89) and 91% white (n = 81/89); their mean age was 24.9 years (standard deviation = 10.36). Analysis of evaluation questionnaires demonstrated increased levels of confidence in working with patients who consume alcohol or other drugs and on certain aspects of interprofessional education. CONCLUSION: Online interprofessional preservice education holds the potential to positively increase nursing students' confidence in working with patients and to increase their interprofessional practice.

8.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 34(3): E1-E6, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30817412

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Control over nursing practice (CONP) in the work setting is associated with several positive consequences such as increased job satisfaction, support of teamwork, decreased patient mortality, and improved quality of care. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the level of perceived CONP among Jordanian registered nurses (RNs) and determine its relationship with their job satisfaction and quality of patient care. METHOD: A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design was used. A convenience sample of 230 RNs was recruited from 4 hospitals. RESULT: The RNs had a moderate level of perceived CONP. This control was positively correlated with their work satisfaction and perception of the quality of patient care that they delivered. CONCLUSION: Nurse managers should be encouraged to take into consideration nurses' perceived CONP to improve working conditions for nurses.


Asunto(s)
Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Cultura Organizacional , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/normas , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , China , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/organización & administración , Masculino , Proceso de Enfermería/normas , Psicometría/instrumentación , Psicometría/métodos , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Lugar de Trabajo/psicología , Lugar de Trabajo/normas
9.
J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc ; 25(6): 467-475, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30596312

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Alcohol and/or opioid stigma perceptions are barriers to screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) implementation. AIM: To examine SBIRT education and clinical exposure efficacy at decreasing nursing students' stigma perceptions toward caring for patients affected by alcohol and/or opioid use problems. METHOD: A single-sample, pretest-posttest design with N = 124 nursing students. The students had a 1.5-hour SBIRT education session and a 12-week clinical experience with some patients who had alcohol and/or opioid use problems. RESULTS: The participants' stigma perceptions improved toward patients who had alcohol and/or opioid use problems. CONCLUSIONS: SBIRT education and clinical exposure may provide a basis for promoting understanding of alcohol and/or opioid use-related stigma and can be used as an intervention to decrease some of stigma's negative effects.

10.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 49(10): 467-473, 2018 Oct 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30257030

RESUMEN

Alcohol is the third leading cause of death and a preventable risk factor contributing to more than 200 diseases and conditions. Unquestionably, health care practitioners should routinely screen and give patients brief feedback on alcohol consumption related to health outcomes; however, they rarely ask patients about alcohol use. Alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI), a public health model of prevention and identification of at-risk alcohol use, has not been widely disseminated. The nursing profession, the largest and most trusted sector of the health care workforce, is perfectly poised to close this gap. This article describes the development of a two-university, grant-funded collaborative online educational program with unique and time-conscious simulation and testing components to increase the knowledge and skills of nurses. The goal of the program is to promote alcohol SBI as a standard of practice in all settings. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(10):467-473.


Asunto(s)
Alcoholismo/diagnóstico , Alcoholismo/enfermería , Curriculum , Diagnóstico Precoz , Educación Continua en Enfermería/organización & administración , Enfermeras Administradoras/educación , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/educación , Adulto , Instrucción por Computador , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Estados Unidos
12.
J Addict Nurs ; 29(3): 163-166, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30180001

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The United States is in the midst of an unprecedented public health crisis, with annual morbidity and mortality data related to opioid use consistently increasing and appearing more worrisome. To mitigate such consequences, it is critical that those with opioid use disorders are provided with and have access to evidence-based treatment modalities. METHODS: The project utilized a course scaffolding approach to integrate a comprehensive substance use framework into an advanced practice nursing curriculum, with an emphasis on medication-assisted treatment as part of an advanced pharmacology course required for licensure. RESULTS: Students' knowledge assessment increased significantly, from an average of 2.82 to 3.78 out of 5 items, t(217) = -10.31, p < .01. CONCLUSIONS: Educators and academic administrators must be steadfast in their resolve to include substance use, and specifically opioid use, education into all areas and levels of nursing study.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/organización & administración , Tratamiento de Sustitución de Opiáceos/métodos , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/tratamiento farmacológico , Buprenorfina/administración & dosificación , Enfermería Basada en la Evidencia , Humanos , Metadona/administración & dosificación , Naltrexona/administración & dosificación , Antagonistas de Narcóticos/administración & dosificación , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/epidemiología , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
13.
J Addict Nurs ; 29(3): 188-195, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30180005

RESUMEN

Opiate overdose deaths are considered an epidemic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Homeless adults are disproportionately affected by opioid overdoses. The purpose of this project was to implement an opiate overdose training and routine naloxone prescribing program for patients at a Health Care for the Homeless clinic. Education consisted of overdose risk factors, signs of overdose, how to respond to an opiate overdose, and how to administer naloxone. Knowledge was measured with a pretest and a posttest. Intranasal naloxone was prescribed for each person who received the education, and prescription fill rates were tracked 1 week after the clinic visit. Patients had a significant increase in knowledge, and the overall naloxone fill rate was 33%. Fill rates varied by housing, insurance, and other prescription status. Opiate overdose education can effectively be delivered in a homeless medical clinic, although more research is needed regarding barriers to naloxone fill rates.


Asunto(s)
Sobredosis de Droga/prevención & control , Personas sin Hogar/educación , Naloxona/administración & dosificación , Antagonistas de Narcóticos/administración & dosificación , Alcaloides Opiáceos/envenenamiento , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/tratamiento farmacológico , Administración Intranasal , Adulto , Instituciones de Atención Ambulatoria/organización & administración , Instituciones de Atención Ambulatoria/normas , Prescripciones de Medicamentos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Educación del Paciente como Asunto , Pennsylvania , Desarrollo de Programa , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Adulto Joven
14.
J Dent Educ ; 82(5): 469-474, 2018 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29717070

RESUMEN

Dental professionals have an opportunity to screen for substance use, provide targeted feedback based on patients' oral health, provide patient education, and refer for further assessment as needed. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on dental hygiene students of an interprofessional Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) educational intervention with standardized patients as a tool for initiating discussions on alcohol and drug use with patients. Starting in 2015, dental hygiene students in two classes at the University of Pittsburgh participated with nursing students in one and a half hours of didactic instruction followed within a ten-week period by SBIRT simulation scenarios utilizing standardized patients, with subsequent debriefing of students by faculty. Students' attitudes were assessed before and after the didactic session and immediately after the SBIRT simulation, using the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perceptions Questionnaire and the Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire. All 67 dental hygiene students in the program at the time participated in the educational intervention and surveys. The results showed significant positive changes in role security, defined as the acceptance of SBIRT delivery as part of their role identity as dental hygienists, following the intervention. This study found that the IPE intervention with dental hygiene and nursing students improved the dental hygiene students' attitudes through using SBIRT.


Asunto(s)
Higienistas Dentales/educación , Educación en Enfermería , Comunicación Interdisciplinaria , Simulación de Paciente , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/diagnóstico , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Adulto Joven
15.
J Community Health Nurs ; 35(2): 41-48, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29714508

RESUMEN

A bully is defined as anyone who participates in any form of repetitive negative and hurtful behavior, with the intent of inflicting harm (Highmark & Center for Safe Schools, 2013). PURPOSE: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a bullying awareness, prevention, and screening program for teachers and school nurses. METHODS: The sample included 174 fifth-graders from a public-school district in rural, southwestern Pennsylvania. Teachers received an educational program and students were screened for bullying using the PIPSQ. RESULTS: Although not a significant finding, there was an increase in teacher's knowledge post-education (p = 0.515). Although findings were not significant, the results of the PIPSQ revealed greater victimization in this school (M = 6.93), with bullying behaviors greater among boys (p = 0.000). CONCLUSIONS: The educational program and the PIPSQ tool appear to be a promising method to identify victimization and bullying within an elementary school setting; further research can determine significance of screening and faculty education.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar/prevención & control , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Niño , Víctimas de Crimen/psicología , Humanos , Masculino , Desarrollo de Programa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
16.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 56(6): 31-35, 2018 Jun 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29447415

RESUMEN

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a therapeutic technique that has been demonstrated to increase adherence to various treatment regimens. Nonattendance at outpatient appointments is associated with read-mission to psychiatric hospitals. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of MI in promoting treatment adherence and increasing pediatric attendance rates at patients' first follow-up appointment after inpatient admission. A sample of 111 patients discharged from one of two child and adolescent units at an urban, inpatient psychiatric hospital in Southwestern Pennsylvania participated in the MI discharge process. Compared to hospital population data from 1 month prior to the current study, the MI discharge process demonstrated an increase of approximately 10% in attendance at the scheduled follow-up appointments and a decrease of approximately 4% in cancellations and no-show appointments. It was concluded that particularly for adolescents, MI may be a valuable treatment approach grounded in partnerships with health care providers, patients, and families to enhance outpatient appointment attendance. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(6), 31-35.].


Asunto(s)
Citas y Horarios , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Entrevista Motivacional/métodos , Pacientes Ambulatorios/psicología , Adolescente , Niño , Familia/psicología , Femenino , Hospitalización , Humanos , Masculino , Cooperación del Paciente , Alta del Paciente , Pennsylvania
18.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 39(2): 151-158, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29370546

RESUMEN

Nurses are in an ideal position to talk to their patients of reproductive age about alcohol use and encourage the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Effective conversations can be efficiently included in the clinical encounter to identify alcohol misuse and offer appropriate follow-up. This report presents results of an environmental scan of resources relevant to nursing professionals and nurses' role in addressing alcohol misuse. Gaps in nursing education and practice guidelines with regard to defining the nursing role in preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancies were revealed. Findings identified a need to promote adoption among nurses of evidence-based preventive practices to prevent alcohol misuse.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Relacionados con Alcohol/prevención & control , Trastornos del Espectro Alcohólico Fetal/prevención & control , Rol de la Enfermera , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Humanos
19.
J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc ; 24(6): 510-521, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29313418

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Stigma associated with substance use is considered a barrier to implementing Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) and assisting patients to receive appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVES: To test the efficacy of SBIRT education and training in changing undergraduate nursing students' attitudes about working with patients who have problems with alcohol and opioid use. DESIGN: A sample of 49 undergraduate nursing students were surveyed, using five subscales, at three time points. RESULTS: After a 15-week semester that included (a) SBIRT education and (b) weekly clinical experiences with patients who had alcohol use problems the undergraduate nursing students' stigma decreased as measured by three of the five subscales. The students' attitudes toward working with patients who had opioid use problems exhibited favorable change as measured by four of the five subscales. CONCLUSION: SBIRT education and training for undergraduate nursing students might help mitigate some of their stigma toward working with patients who have mild to moderate alcohol and opioid use problems.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/métodos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos , Derivación y Consulta/estadística & datos numéricos , Estereotipo , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/terapia , Adulto , Alcoholismo/terapia , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Femenino , Educación en Salud/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/terapia , Proyectos Piloto , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
20.
J Emerg Nurs ; 44(4): 336-344, 2018 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29107318

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The opioid crisis continues to take an unprecedented number of lives and is the top cause of injury death in the United States. The emergency department is a setting where patients with pain seek care and may be prescribed an opioid, yet many patients do not receive evidence-based education about taking their opioid safely. Like many communities across the country, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, has experienced an increased rate of opioid overdoses; from 2015-2016, the number of opioid-related overdose deaths in the county increased by 44%. METHODS: This quality improvement project is the implementation of a nurse-delivered, evidence-based education initiative for patients prescribed an opioid in an emergency department. Nurses were briefly trained on opioid safety and patient education, then over 12 weeks, delivered the dual-modal (verbal and written) education with a patient teach-back to verify comprehension. RESULTS: Nurses who completed the project training on opioid safety and patient education had a statistically significant improvement in their knowledge. Patient satisfaction surveys showed 100% of patients reported clear understanding of how to take their pain medication, and out of the patients receiving the opioid pain education for the first time, 88.2% learned something new about how to safely take, store, or dispose of their pain medication. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Improving the delivery of opioid prescription education at emergency department discharge will enhance patient knowledge and promote safety, which may help mitigate the opioid crisis by reducing the rate of opioid use disorder and accidental overdoses.


Asunto(s)
Analgésicos Opioides , Enfermería de Urgencia/métodos , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Humanos , Dolor/tratamiento farmacológico , Alta del Paciente , Pennsylvania
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