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1.
J Prosthodont Res ; 64(3): 264-271, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31445849

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study evaluated the effect of the use of a powder-type adhesive on masticatory performance and oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients with normal and resorbed mandibular ridges during adaptation period with complete dentures. METHODS: Forty-two edentulous subjects (12 men, 30 women) were distributed in four groups: normal mandibular ridges with adhesive, n = 10; normal mandibular ridges without adhesive, n = 10; resorbed mandibular ridges with adhesive, n = 11; resorbed mandibular ridges without adhesive, n = 11. Masticatory performance was evaluated by sieving method and OHRQoL by Oral Health Impact Profile in Edentulous Adults (OHIP-EDENT) inventory at 30, 60 and 90 days after the insertion of new complete dentures. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA test and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEEs), α = 0.05. RESULTS: The use of adhesive resulted in better masticatory performance at 30 (35.76 ± 12.63%) and 60 days (30.06 ± 10.54%) after the insertion of the dentures and did not influence on OHRQoL in participants with normal ridges during the adaptation period. The use of adhesive did not interfere on masticatory performance during adaptation period and had a negative effect on masticatory discomfort/disability subscale OHRQoL at 30-day period [5.2(3.6, 6.8)] for resorbed mandibular ridges with new complete dentures. CONCLUSIONS: The use of adhesive can improve masticatory performance of new complete dentures users with normal mandibular ridges in the initial adaptation period up to 60 days after insertion. For resorbed ridges subjects, the use of adhesive had a negative impact on masticatory discomfort/disability OHRQoL at 30 days after insertion.


Asunto(s)
Boca Edéntula , Calidad de Vida , Adulto , Cementos Dentales , Dentadura Completa , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Masticación
2.
J Int Acad Periodontol ; 18: 120-128, 2016 Oct 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31473700

RESUMEN

Two cases of aesthetic implant abutment rehabilitation in the maxillary anterior area in periodontally compromised patients following conventional periodontal therapy and tooth extractions are presented. For the two cases of anterior tooth loss due to advanced periodontal disease progression, atraumatic flapless extractions were performed followed by the placement of immediate implants and provisional restorations. For the first case, lithium disilicate cemented over the abutment was used to achieve excellent aesthetic results. In the second case, custom zirconia abutments were used as prosthetic components. The results at the 3-year follow-up showed absence of inflammation and/or infection on the peri-implantar tissue with satisfactory aesthetic and excellent biological and clinical results achieved with reduced treatment time and morbidity for both patients. Total absence of infection and frequent plaque control after implant placement are mandatory before selection of the abutment material. The planning of the final treatment as specified by the concept of comprehensive dental care is outlined, and the final outcome is discussed in relation to the literature.

3.
J Prosthet Dent ; 115(4): 428-36, 2016 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26597465

RESUMEN

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: The longevity of dental implants depends on the absence of inflammation in the periimplant tissue. Similar to teeth, pathogenic bacteria can adhere on implant abutment surfaces and cause periimplant disease and consequently implant loss. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of physical and chemical properties of 2 common materials used as implant abutments, titanium (Ti) and zirconia (ZrO2), and the use of bovine enamel (BE) as a positive control on biofilm formation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Biofilm formation was analyzed by growing Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum as monospecies and mixed species biofilms on the surfaces. The mean roughness (Ra) and surface free energy were evaluated for each material. Mature biofilm, formed after 7 days of incubation, was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively by colony-forming unit and confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: The mean roughness in all disks was ≤0.21 µm and did not affect the bacterial adhesion. Titanium showed a greater degree of hydrophilicity compared with BE after 90 minutes of immersion in saliva. The surface free energy did not show differences, with the highest values for BE. Monospecies biofilms formed by P. gingivalis on Ti, and mixed species biofilm on ZrO2 exhibited small numbers of cells on disk surfaces. By confocal imaging, the mixed species biofilm appeared as a thin layer on ZrO2 surfaces. CONCLUSIONS: Material surfaces could have a significant impact on biofilm formation. ZrO2 implant abutment surfaces showed a decrease in anaerobic biofilm compared with Ti and BE.


Asunto(s)
Biopelículas , Diseño de Implante Dental-Pilar , Implantes Dentales/microbiología , Materiales Dentales/química , Adhesión Bacteriana , Humanos , Propiedades de Superficie , Titanio
5.
Case Rep Dent ; 2014: 702630, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24955259

RESUMEN

When dental implants are malpositioned in relation to the adjacent teeth and alveolar bone or in an excessive buccal or lingual position, the final prosthesis rehabilitation impairs the peri-implant health of the gingival tissues and the aesthetics of the patient. Thus, the purpose of this case was to report and discuss a multidisciplinary protocol for the treatment of a compromised maxillary tooth in a patient with an abscess in his right central incisor due to an excessive buccal implant position. The patient presented with an implant-supported provisional restoration on his right maxillary central incisor and a traumatic injury in his left central incisor. The treatment protocol consisted in (i) abutment substitution to compensate the incorrect angulation of the implant, (ii) clinical crown lengthening, (iii) atraumatic extraction of the left central incisor, and (iv) immediate implant placement. Finally, (v) a custom abutment was fabricated to obtain a harmonious gingival contour around the prosthetic crown. In conclusion, when implants are incorrectly positioned in relation to the adjacent teeth, associated with soft-tissue defects, the challenge to create a harmonious mucogingival contours may be achieved with an interdisciplinary approach and with the placement of an appropriate custom abutment.

6.
Case Rep Dent ; 2014: 925363, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24872900

RESUMEN

The aim of this paper is to present a complex rehabilitation, of fractured tooth, with implants in anterior region considering the orthodontics extrusion to clinical success. At 7 years old, the patient fractured the maxillary left central incisor and the dentist did a crown with the fragment. Twenty years later, the patient was referred to a dental clinic for orthodontic treatment, with the chief complaint related to an accentuated deep bite, and a professional started an orthodontic treatment. After sixteen months of orthodontic treatment, tooth 21 fractured. The treatment plan included an orthodontic extrusion of tooth 21 and implant placement. This case has been followed up and the clinical and radiographic examinations show excellence esthetic results and satisfaction of patient. The forced extrusion can be a viable treatment option in the management of crown root fracture of an anterior tooth to gain bone in a vertical direction. This case emphasizes that to achieve the esthetic result a multidisciplinary approach is necessary.

7.
J Prosthodont Res ; 57(4): 268-74, 2013 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24075828

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study compared the dimensional accuracy of stone index (I) and three impression techniques: tapered impression copings (T), squared impression copings (S) and modified squared impression copings (MS) for implant-supported prostheses. METHODS: A master cast, with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework, were fabricated. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material was used for all impressions with two metal stock trays (open and closed tray). Four groups (I, T, S and MS) were tested (n=5). A metallic framework was seated on each of the casts, one abutment screw was tightened, and the gap between the analog of implant and the framework was measured with a stereomicroscope. The groups' measurements (80 gap values) were analyzed using software (LeicaQWin - Leica Imaging Systems Ltd.) that received the images of a video camera coupled to a Leica stereomicroscope at 100× magnification. The results were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis One Way ANOVA on Ranks test followed by Dunn's Method, 0.05. RESULTS: The mean values of abutment/framework interface gaps were: Master Cast=32 µm (SD 2); Group I=45 µm (SD 3); Group T=78 µm (SD 25); Group S=134 µm (SD 30); Group MS=143 µm (SD 27). No significant difference was detected among Index and Master Cast (P=.05). CONCLUSION: Under the limitations of this study, it could be suggested that a more accurate working cast is possible using tapered impression copings techniques and stone index.


Asunto(s)
Técnica de Impresión Dental , Revestimiento para Colado Dental , Materiales de Impresión Dental
8.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 19(3): 249-53, 2011.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21625742

RESUMEN

UNLABELLED: Denture fractures are common in daily practice, causing inconvenience to the patient and to the dentists. Denture repairs should have adequate strength, dimensional stability and color match, and should be easily and quickly performed as well as relatively inexpensive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: warm water-bath, microwave energy, and chemical polymerization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty rectangular specimens (31x10x2.5 mm) were made with warm water-bath acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and grouped (15 specimens per group) according to the resin type used to make repair procedure: 1) specimens of warm water-bath resin (Lucitone 550) without repair (control group); 2) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with warm water-bath; 3) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with microwave resin (Acron MC); 4) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with autopolymerized acrylic resin (Simplex). Flexural strength was measured with the three-point bending in a universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) with load cell of 100 kgf under constant speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). RESULTS: The control group showed the best result (156.04±1.82 MPa). Significant differences were found among repaired specimens and the results were decreasing as follows: group 3 (43.02±2.25 MPa), group 2 (36.21±1.20 MPa) and group 4 (6.74±0.85 MPa). CONCLUSION: All repaired specimens demonstrated lower flexural strength than the control group. Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin showed the lowest flexural strength.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Acrílicas/química , Reparación de la Dentadura/métodos , Bases para Dentadura , Ensayo de Materiales , Microondas , Docilidad , Polimerizacion , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Propiedades de Superficie , Resistencia a la Tracción , Factores de Tiempo , Agua/química
9.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants ; 25(4): 771-6, 2010.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20657873

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To investigate, in vitro, the dimensional accuracy of two impression techniques (squared impression copings and squared impression copings sandblasted and coated with impression adhesive) made of vinyl polysiloxane and polyether impression materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master cast (control group) with four parallel implant abutment analogs, a passive framework, and a custom aluminum tray was fabricated. Four groups (n = 5 each group) were tested: squared Impregum (SI), squared Express (SE), sandblasted adhesive squared Impregum (ASI), and sandblasted adhesive squared Express (ASE). The measurement method employed was just one titanium screw tightened to the framework. A stereomicroscope was used to evaluate the fit of the framework by measuring the size of the gap between the abutment and the framework. The results were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: The mean values for the abutment/framework interface gaps were: master cast, 31.63 µm (SD 2.16); SI, 38.03 µm (SD 9.29); ASI, 46.80 µm (SD 8.47); SE, 151.21 µm (SD 22.79); and ASE, 136.59 µm (SD 29.80). No significant difference was detected between the SI or ASI techniques and the master cast. No significant difference was detected between the SE and ASE techniques. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Impregum Soft medium consistency was the best impression material and the impression technique did not influence the accuracy of the stone casts.


Asunto(s)
Materiales de Impresión Dental/química , Técnica de Impresión Dental , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Materiales Biocompatibles Revestidos/química , Pilares Dentales , Revestimiento para Colado Dental/química , Técnica de Colado Dental , Grabado Dental/métodos , Implantes Dentales , Técnica de Impresión Dental/normas , Técnica de Impresión Dental/estadística & datos numéricos , Adaptación Marginal Dental , Materiales Dentales/química , Humanos , Ensayo de Materiales , Polivinilos/química , Resinas Sintéticas/química , Siloxanos/química , Programas Informáticos , Propiedades de Superficie , Titanio/química , Torque , Grabación en Video
10.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants ; 25(6): 1153-8, 2010.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21197492

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This in vitro study compared the dimensional accuracy of two impression techniques: Duralay splinted impression copings (D) and metal splinted impression copings (M) for implant-supported prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master cast with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework were fabricated. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material was used for all impressions with a metal stock tray. Two groups (D and M) were tested (n = 5). The measurement method employed was just one titanium screw tightened to the framework. Each group's measurements were analyzed using software that received the images of a video camera coupled to a stereomicroscope at 3100 magnification. The results were analyzed statistically (t test). RESULTS: The mean values of abutment/framework interface gaps were: master cast = 32 Μm (SD 2), group D =165 Μm (SD 60), and group M = 69 Μm (SD 36). There was a statistically significant difference between the D and M groups (P ⋜ .001). CONCLUSION: Under the limitations of this study, it could be suggested that a more accurate working cast can be fabricated using metal splinted impression copings.


Asunto(s)
Materiales de Impresión Dental , Técnica de Impresión Dental/instrumentación , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Férulas (Fijadores) , Pilares Dentales , Implantación Dental Endoósea , Implantes Dentales , Modelos Dentales , Humanos , Planificación de Atención al Paciente , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
11.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants ; 23(2): 226-36, 2008.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18548918

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of a stone index and of 3 impression techniques (tapered impression copings, squared impression copings, and squared impression copings splinted with acrylic resin) associated with 3 pouring techniques (conventional, pouring using latex tubes fitted onto analogs, and pouring after joining the analogs with acrylic resin) for implant-supported prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A mandibular brass cast with 4 stainless steel implant-abutment analogs, a framework, and 2 aluminum custom trays were fabricated. Polyether impression material was used for all impressions. Ten groups were formed (a control group and 9 test groups formed by combining each pouring technique and impression technique). Five casts were made per group for a total of 50 casts and 200 gap values (1 gap value for each implant-abutment analog). RESULTS: The mean gap value with the index technique was 27.07 microm. With the conventional pouring technique, the mean gap values were 116.97 microm for the tapered group, 57.84 microm for the squared group, and 73.17 microm for the squared splinted group. With pouring using latex tubes, the mean gap values were 65.69 microm for the tapered group, 38.03 microm for the squared group, and 82.47 microm for the squared splinted group. With pouring after joining the analogs with acrylic resin, the mean gap values were 141.12 microm for the tapered group, 74.19 microm for the squared group, and 104.67 microm for the squared splinted group. No significant difference was detected among Index, square/latex techniques, and master cast (P >.05). CONCLUSIONS: The most accurate impression technique utilized squared copings. The most accurate pouring technique for making the impression with tapered or squared copings utilized latex tubes. The pouring did not influence the accuracy of the stone casts when using splinted squared impression copings. Either the index technique or the use of squared coping combined with the latex-tube pouring technique are preferred methods for making implant-supported fixed restorations with dimensional accuracy.


Asunto(s)
Pilares Dentales , Técnica de Impresión Dental , Modelos Dentales , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Prótesis Dental de Soporte Implantado , Implantación Dental Endoósea , Implantes Dentales , Humanos , Látex , Mandíbula , Estadísticas no Paramétricas
12.
Braz Dent J ; 16(2): 119-23, 2005.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16475605

RESUMEN

Microwave energy has been used as an alternative method for disinfection and sterilization of dental prostheses. This study evaluated the influence of microwave treatment on dimensional accuracy along the posterior palatal border of maxillary acrylic resin denture bases processed by water-bath curing. Thirty maxillary acrylic bases (3-mm-thick) were made on cast models with Clássico acrylic resin using routine technique. After polymerization and cooling, the sets were deflasked and the bases were stored in water for 30 days. Thereafter, the specimens were assigned to 3 groups (n=10), as follows: group I (control) was not submitted to any disinfection cycle; group II was submitted to microwave disinfection for 3 min at 500 W; and in group III microwaving was done for 10 min at 604 W. The acrylic bases were fixed on their respective casts with instant adhesive (Super Bonder) and the base/cast sets were sectioned transversally in the posterior palatal zone. The existence of gaps between the casts and acrylic bases was assessed using a profile projector at 5 points. No statistically significant differences were observed between the control group and group II. However, group III differed statistically from the others (p<0.05). Treatment in microwave oven at 604 W for 10 min produced the greatest discrepancies in the adaptation of maxillary acrylic resin denture bases to the stone casts.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Acrílicas/efectos de la radiación , Bases para Dentadura , Desinfección/métodos , Microondas , Resinas Acrílicas/química , Adhesivos/química , Modelos Dentales , Humanos , Ensayo de Materiales , Maxilar , Metacrilatos/química , Polímeros/química , Polímeros/efectos de la radiación , Propiedades de Superficie , Factores de Tiempo
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