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1.
BMJ Open Qual ; 7(4): e000417, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30515469

RESUMEN

Background: One in three people over the age of 65 fall every year, with 1/3 sustaining at least moderate injury. Falls risk reduction requires an interprofessional health team approach. The literature is lacking in effective models to teach students how to work collaboratively in interprofessional teams for geriatric falls prevention. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, administration and outcome measures of an education programme to teach principles of interprofessional care for older adults in the context of falls prevention. Methods: Students from three academic institutions representing 12 health disciplines took part in the education programme over 18 months (n=237). A mixed method one-group pretest and post-test experimental design was implemented to measure the impact of a multistep education model on progression in interprofessional collaboration competencies and satisfaction. Results: Paired t-tests of pre-education to posteducation measures of Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale scores (n=136) demonstrated statistically significant increase in subscales and total scores (p<0.001). Qualitative satisfaction results were strongly positive. Discussion: Results of this study indicate that active interprofessional education can result in positive student attitude regarding interprofessional team-based care, and satisfaction with learning. Lessons learnt in a rapid cycle plan-do-study-act approach are shared to guide replication efforts for other educators. Conclusion: Effective models to teach falls prevention interventions and interprofessional practice are not yet established. This education model is easily replicable and can be used to teach interprofessional teamwork competency skills in falls and other geriatric syndromes.

2.
J Interpers Violence ; : 886260518807220, 2018 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30382799

RESUMEN

Prior research has indicated the significant overlap between risky alcohol use and intimate partner violence (IPV) among couples. However, few studies have explicitly examined the intersection of alcohol use and IPV among distressed couples (e.g., couples seeking couples therapy). The current study aimed to (a) examine how couples presenting to couple therapy experience alcohol use, IPV, and the co-occurrence of both alcohol use and IPV and (b) the effect of the intersection of alcohol use and IPV in couples on relational functioning. Archival data collected from 71 couples presenting to couple therapy at a University training clinic were used to explore the research aims. Data analysis procedures included univariate statistics to characterize the sample and bivariate statistics to examine the research aims. Findings indicated that 16.9% of couples screened positive for both alcohol use and IPV and that there were significant group differences in relational functioning among females in the sample. These findings indicate the potential need for universal alcohol and IPV screening among clinicians working with couples.

3.
Subst Use Misuse ; 53(3): 484-489, 2018 02 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29116871

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Prior research suggests that Latinos are at higher risk of alcohol use as compared to their counterparts (NSDUH, 2014). However, little work has been conducted to understand alcohol use among Latinos systemically and more research is needed to better understand the impact of couple functioning on alcohol use among Latino couples. OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to examine how each partner's perception of couple functioning impacted alcohol use in Latino dyads. METHODS: Using data from 329 Latino dyads from the Building Strong Families (BSF) Project, a structural equation model examining the actor-partner interactions between partner perceptions of couple functioning and each person's alcohol use was analyzed. RESULTS: Correlation analysis revealed that the dyad's perceptions of couple functioning were positively correlated. Results from the APIM model indicated male's perceptions of couple functioning was positively associated with his own alcohol use, whereas female's perceptions of couple functioning was not significantly related to either partner's alcohol use. Conclusions/Importance: The findings may help clinicians, researchers, and policy makers to better conceptualize how couple functioning may impact alcohol use among Latino dyads.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Composición Familiar , Hispanoamericanos/psicología , Relaciones Interpersonales , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
4.
J Marital Fam Ther ; 43(4): 733-742, 2017 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28401577

RESUMEN

Marriage and family therapists (MFTs) use ethical codes and state licensure laws/rules as guidelines for best clinical practice. It is important that professional codes reflect the potential exponential use of technology in therapy. However, current standards regarding technology use lack clarity. To explore this gap, a summative content analysis was conducted on state licensure laws/rules and professional ethical codes to find themes and subthemes among the many aspects of therapy in which technology can be utilized. Findings from the content analysis indicated that while there have been efforts by both state and professional organizations to incorporate guidance for technology use in therapy, a clear and comprehensive "roadmap" is still missing. Future scholarship is needed that develops clearer guidelines for therapists.


Asunto(s)
Redes de Comunicación de Computadores , Terapia Familiar , Terapia Conyugal , Telecomunicaciones , Redes de Comunicación de Computadores/ética , Redes de Comunicación de Computadores/legislación & jurisprudencia , Redes de Comunicación de Computadores/normas , Terapia Familiar/ética , Terapia Familiar/legislación & jurisprudencia , Terapia Familiar/métodos , Humanos , Terapia Conyugal/ética , Terapia Conyugal/legislación & jurisprudencia , Terapia Conyugal/métodos , Telecomunicaciones/ética , Telecomunicaciones/legislación & jurisprudencia , Telecomunicaciones/normas
5.
Subst Use Misuse ; 51(1): 34-40, 2016 Jan 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26669633

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Both alcohol use and depression are concerning health issues among youth. The Emergency Department (ED) is a critical location to access youth with depressive symptoms and alcohol misuse. OBJECTIVES: To inform future interventions in the ED, this study examined the relationship between drinking behaviors and depressive symptoms among youth seeking ED care. METHODS: Youth ages 14-20 were recruited from a level-1 trauma ED located in the Midwest as part of a larger ongoing study. Participants completed an electronic screening survey, which included assessment of alcohol use, depressive symptoms, and demographic variables. Two logistic regression models were conducted to assess the relationship between depressive symptoms with alcohol consumption and specific alcohol-related consequences. RESULTS: Among 3,659 participants, bivariate analysis indicated that individuals screening positive for depression were more likely to be female, nonwhite, receive public assistance, and report higher scores on both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. Regression analyses indicated alcohol consumption, inability to stop drinking once starting, and feelings of guilt or remorse after drinking were significantly positively related to screening positive for depression. CONCLUSIONS/IMPORTANCE: Current findings support use of the ED as a location for identifying youth who are experiencing co-morbid alcohol use and depressive symptoms. Future research should focus on the effectiveness of brief intervention in the ED that focuses on the co-occurrence of alcohol misuse and depressive symptoms among youth.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Trastorno Depresivo/epidemiología , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Medio Oeste de Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Prevalencia , Población Suburbana , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
6.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs ; 75(4): 573-9, 2014 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24988256

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to evaluate individual, relational, and community-level risk and promotive factors for transactional sex involvement among substance-using youth. METHOD: Youth (ages 14-24 years) presenting for care in an urban emergency department, who reported drug use within the past 6 months, were surveyed as part of a larger study assessing violence. Of the 600 youth enrolled in this study, 350 presented to the emergency department with violent injury. Based on youth presenting with violent injury, a proportionally selected (age and gender) comparison group of youth (n = 250) presenting without violent injury were enrolled. Participants were queried about both risk and promotive factors at the individual, relational, and community levels. RESULTS: Of the sample, 7.3% reported involvement in transactional sex within the past month. Regression analyses indicated that being African American or other race (as compared with White), having more than one sexual partner, depressive symptoms, negative peer influence, and substance use treatment utilization were positively associated with transactional sex involvement. Increased school involvement was negatively related to involvement in transactional sex. CONCLUSIONS: Drug-using youth who reported recent transactional sex involvement are more likely to experience increased HIV risk, depressive symptoms, and negative peer influence and are less likely to experience the promotive factors of school involvement. Future research is needed to better understand the bidirectional relationship between transactional sex involvement and both risk and promotive factors at multiple ecological levels.


Asunto(s)
Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Trabajo Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Conducta Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Adolescente , Grupos de Población Continentales/estadística & datos numéricos , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/transmisión , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Análisis de Regresión , Asunción de Riesgos , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos , Violencia , Adulto Joven
7.
Psychol Addict Behav ; 28(2): 625-30, 2014 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24955680

RESUMEN

Men and women involved in transactional sex (TS) report increased rates of HIV risk behaviors and substance use problems as compared with the general population. When people engaged in TS seek health care, they may be more likely to utilize the emergency department (ED) rather than primary care services. Our goal was to examine the prevalence and correlates of TS involvement among an ED sample of men and women. Adults ages 18-60 were recruited from an urban ED, as part of a larger randomized control trial. Participants (n = 4,575; 3,045 women, 1,530 men) self-administered a screening survey that assessed past 3-month substance use (including alcohol, marijuana, illicit drugs, and prescription drugs) and HIV risk behaviors, including TS (i.e., being paid in exchange of a sexual behavior), inconsistent condom use, multiple partners, and anal sex. Of the sample, 13.3% (n = 610) reported TS within the past 3 months (64.4% were female). Bivariate analysis showed TS was significantly positively associated with alcohol use severity, marijuana use, and both illicit and prescription drug use, and multiple HIV risk behaviors. These variables (except marijuana) remained significantly positively associated with TS in a binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of recent TS involvement among both male and female ED patients is substantial. These individuals were more likely to report higher levels of alcohol/drug use and HIV risk behaviors. The ED may be a prime location to engage both men and women who are involved in TS in behavioral interventions for substance use and sexual risk reduction.


Asunto(s)
Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Infecciones por VIH , Trabajo Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Sexo Inseguro/estadística & datos numéricos , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Factores de Riesgo
8.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 35(5): 537-44, 2013 Sep-Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23810465

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The study's objective was to identify correlates of depressive symptoms among at-risk youth in an urban emergency department (ED). METHOD: A systematic sample of adolescents (ages 14-18) in the ED were recruited as part of a larger study. Participants reporting past-year alcohol use and peer aggression self-administered a survey assessing: demographics, depressive symptoms and risk/protective factors. Logistic regression identified factors associated with depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Among 624 adolescents (88% response rate) meeting eligibility criteria, 22.8% (n=142) screened positive for depressive symptoms. In logistic regression, depressive symptoms were positively associated with female gender [odds ratio (OR): 2.84, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.78-4.51], poor academic performance (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.01-2.44), binge drinking (OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.21-2.91), community violence exposure (OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.59-3.18) and dating violence (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.36-3.38) and were negatively associated with same-sex mentorship (OR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.29-0.91) and older age (OR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.34-0.89). Including gender interaction terms did not significantly change findings. CONCLUSIONS: Screening and intervention approaches for youth in the urban ED should address the co-occurrence of depressive symptoms with peer and dating violence, alcohol and nonmarijuana illicit drug use.


Asunto(s)
Depresión/epidemiología , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Depresión/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Escalas de Valoración Psiquiátrica , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Sexuales , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Violencia/psicología , Violencia/estadística & datos numéricos
9.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 45(2): 196-205, 2013 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23523250

RESUMEN

Substance abuse treatment providers commonly provide services for men and women involved in sex work. Sex workers often present to treatment with a complicated array of challenges (M. L. Burnette et al., 2008a; D. C. Ling, W. C. W. Wong, E. A. Holroyd, & S. A. Grayson, 2007; M. Young, C. Boyd, & A. Hubbell, 2000), and, while many scholars have posited the need for adapted interventions for sex workers (L. Nuttbrock, A. Rosenblum, S. Magura, C. Villano, & J. Wallace, 2004; A. Weiner, 1996), there is still a lull in the development of comprehensive, tailored services for sex workers seeking substance abuse treatment (L. Nuttbrock et al., 2004). Augmenting this gap is the lack of a clear framework through which to understand the challenges that sex workers endure and how their challenges may differ from treatment-seeking non-sex workers. In order to address this gap, the current study explored the utility of a social justice framework, namely the Capability Approach, in predicting sex work involvement among a substance-abusing sample. We hypothesize that increased challenges to achieving capability will predict sex work involvement among a substance-abusing sample. Results suggest that the Capability Approach is a useful framework that can be used to differentiate between sex workers and their substance-abusing counterparts and that sex workers experience greater challenges to achieving capability. As such, the current findings support recent calls in the literature for the development of tailored services to meet the needs of this population.


Asunto(s)
Trabajadores Sexuales/estadística & datos numéricos , Justicia Social , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/rehabilitación , Adulto , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Estudios Prospectivos , Centros de Tratamiento de Abuso de Sustancias , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
10.
Community Ment Health J ; 47(2): 220-6, 2011 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20043208

RESUMEN

Follow-up rates reported among longitudinal studies that focus on runaway adolescents and their families are relatively low. Identifying factors associated with follow-up completion might be useful for improving follow-up rates and therefore study validity. The present study explored how individual- and family-level constructs, as well as research project activities, influence the follow-up completion rate among runaway adolescents (N = 140) and their primary caregiver. Results showed that follow-up completion rates decreased as the number of research assistants (RA) assigned to each case increased and as participants' address changes increased. Additionally, among adolescents, more frequent alcohol use was associated with lower follow-up rates. The current findings suggest that researchers should (1) design their research so that one RA is assigned to each specific case, and (2) adjust their retention strategies to account for the differences in follow-up rates based upon the participants' drug of choice and residential stability.


Asunto(s)
Alcoholismo/rehabilitación , Familia , Jóvenes sin Hogar/psicología , Cooperación del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Medio Social , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/rehabilitación , Adolescente , Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Alcoholismo/psicología , Cuidadores , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Visita Domiciliaria , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Análisis Multivariante , Evaluación de Procesos y Resultados (Atención de Salud) , Cooperación del Paciente/psicología , Proyectos de Investigación , Conducta Fugitiva , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología
11.
J Interpers Violence ; 25(9): 1579-93, 2010 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20056815

RESUMEN

No study to date has reported intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among homeless youth. This study sought to uncover lifetime prevalence estimates of physical, sexual, and emotional IPV among a nonprobability sample of 180 homeless male and female youth in Columbus, Ohio. To that aim, self-reported IPV and the association between IPV and gender, race, age, and history of childhood abuse were examined. Results showed that physical violence and verbal abuse were the most commonly reported experiences of IPV in the current sample and ranged from 30.0% to 35.4%. Women and those with a history of childhood abuse were more likely to be victimized by their intimate partners. Specifically, multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that women were approximately twice as likely as men to be verbally and physically abused in intimate relationships. Moreover, youth who reported being victims of abuse in childhood were more than twice as likely to experience verbal abuse and physical violence in their relationships. Given the high lifetime occurrence of IPV among homeless youth, intervention efforts should target IPV to prevent future occurrence. Findings also suggest that intervention efforts should consider gender and history of childhood abuse.


Asunto(s)
Víctimas de Crimen/estadística & datos numéricos , Personas sin Hogar/estadística & datos numéricos , Maltrato Conyugal/estadística & datos numéricos , Sobrevivientes/estadística & datos numéricos , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Agresión/psicología , Víctimas de Crimen/psicología , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Personas sin Hogar/psicología , Humanos , Relaciones Interpersonales , Masculino , Análisis Multivariante , Ohio/epidemiología , Prevalencia , Factores de Riesgo , Maltrato Conyugal/prevención & control , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Sobrevivientes/psicología , Adulto Joven
12.
Addict Behav ; 34(8): 675-84, 2009 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19411144

RESUMEN

Runaway adolescents engage in high rates of substance use and report significant family and individual problems. However, in general, adolescents report low motivation to change their substance use. Because a higher level of motivation for changing substance use is associated with greater substance abuse treatment success, identifying variables associated with motivation for change can be useful for enhancing treatment success. In this study, predictors of motivation for changing substance use were examined among 140 shelter-recruited adolescents and their parents/primary caretakers. Several findings were noteworthy. A perceived negative family environment increased parents' and adolescents' depressive symptoms, which increased adolescent's motivation to change. Also, greater severity of adolescent substance use predicted higher motivation to change. Consideration of the family environment and parent problems when addressing motivation for changing substance use among these adolescents might be important foci for motivational interventions and future research.


Asunto(s)
Hijo de Padres Discapacitados/psicología , Jóvenes sin Hogar/psicología , Motivación , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/rehabilitación , Adolescente , Alcoholismo/psicología , Alcoholismo/rehabilitación , Niño , Depresión/psicología , Diagnóstico Dual (Psiquiatría) , Salud de la Familia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Relaciones Padres-Hijo , Padres/psicología , Escalas de Valoración Psiquiátrica , Psicometría , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología
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