Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 23
Filtrar
1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3859, 2021 Feb 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33594151

RESUMEN

This study aimed to assess the apical extrusion of debris during instrumentation of primary canines using three endodontic file types. Forty-five extracted primary canines were randomly assigned to three instrumentation groups (n = 15): Hand K-files; and the motorized Kedo-S files and XP-endo Shaper files. The apically extruded debris produced during the procedure was collected and dried in pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes, and the mass of debris was calculated. The time required for the endodontic procedure was also recorded. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test were used with a significance level set at 5%. XP-endo Shaper and Kedo-S files extruded significantly less debris compared with hand K-files with means of 0.84 ± 0.31 and 1.20 ± 0.67 mg respectively, compared to 2.13 ± 0.31 mg (p < 0.0001). No significant difference was found between the two motorized files. Less time was required to complete the procedure with the XP-endo Shaper compared to the hand K-files (p < 0.0001) and Kedo-S files (p < 0.0001). Within the limitations of the present study, it may be concluded that motorized files extruded less debris and required less instrumentation time compared to traditional K-files, which could benefit paediatric patients with root canal treatment needs.

2.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 434, 2020 01 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31949190

RESUMEN

Anatomical features of first maxillary premolars may greatly affect endodontic and following restorative treatments. The aim of this study was to evaluate root canal configuration and root wall thickness of first maxillary premolars using a preexisting CBCT database. A CBCT database of 400 first maxillary premolar was used to study canal configuration, presence of furcation-facing groove on the buccal root and root wall thickness. Root wall thickness was measured from axial CBCT slices at three critical points of the root: The most coronal part of the furcation-facing groove in the buccal root, when present, the CEJ level of the palatal root and 5 mm apically to the CEJ level of the palatal root. Vertucci Type IV configuration was the most common among all teeth, but in single-rooted teeth, Vertucci Type II was predominant. The mean thickness of the buccal root in the area of a furcation-facing groove was 1.1 (±0.2) mm, but in 39% of the cases, it was thinner than 1 mm. The mean thickness of the palatal root at 5 mm from the CEJ was 1.1 (±0.2), but in 28% of the cases, it was thinner than 1 mm. Thickness of root dentin walls of first maxillary premolars varies and may be limited at critical points in both buccal and palatal roots. In case the patient has a previous CBCT scan it may be useful for planning treatment of first maxillary premolars, in order to recognize and avoid potential risks such as furcation-facing groove, thin dentin walls in critical areas and presence of Type II Verucci canal, all of which may dictate less invasive procedures, using smaller files.


Asunto(s)
Diente Premolar/anatomía & histología , Tomografía Computarizada de Haz Cónico , Cavidad Pulpar/anatomía & histología , Cavidad Pulpar/diagnóstico por imagen , Maxilar , Adulto , Anciano , Diente Premolar/diagnóstico por imagen , Femenino , Humanos , Israel , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
3.
J Endod ; 45(10): 1242-1247, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31472950

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the centering ability and canal transportation of the ProTaper Next (PTN; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and Self-adjusting File (SAF; ReDent-Nova, Ra'anana, Israel) systems in long oval root canals using cone-beam computed tomography imaging. METHODS: Fifty-six fully formed single-rooted mandibular premolars were selected with a buccolingual canal size 2 to 2.5 times the mesiodistal size at 5 mm from the apex, ranging from a 0°-10° canal curvature with a 5- to 6-mm radius. The teeth were divided into 2 groups (n = 28) and prepared with PTN or SAF according to the manufacturers' instructions. Cone-beam computed tomographic images were taken in the same position before and after instrumentation using modeling wax. The centering ability and canal transportation were calculated at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex in both mesiodistal and buccolingual directions. The mean and standard deviation were calculated, and the Student t test was used for comparative analysis. RESULTS: significant difference for canal transportation was observed mesiodistally at 9 mm from the apex (P < .05) where the PTN shaved more dentin in 1 direction. A significant difference for the centering ability was observed at 6 mm buccolingually from the apex (P < .05) where the PTN was less centered in the canal compared with the SAF. CONCLUSIONS: Both SAF and PTN were shown to be safe for being used in long oval canals. SAF resulted in less transportation at the coronal third in the mesiodistal direction and more centered at the middle third in the buccolingual direction compared with PTN.


Asunto(s)
Cavidad Pulpar , Preparación del Conducto Radicular , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos , Israel , Diente Molar , Microtomografía por Rayos X
4.
Restor Dent Endod ; 44(3): e31, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31485427

RESUMEN

Objectives: To compare the formation of dentinal defects using stainless-steel hand K-files (HFs), rotary files, reciprocating files, and Self-Adjusting File (SAF), when used for oval root canals. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty extracted human mandibular premolar with single root and oval canal were selected for this study. Oval canals were confirmed by exposing to mesio-distal and bucco-lingual radiographs. Teeth with open apices or anatomic irregularities were excluded. All selected teeth were de-coronated perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, leaving roots segments approximately of 16 mm in length. Twenty teeth were left unprepared (control), and the remaining 120 teeth were divided into 6 groups (n = 20) and instrumented using HF (size 40/0.02), Revo-S (RS; size 40/0.06), ProTaper NEXT (PTN; size 40/0.06), WaveOne (WO; size 40/0.09), RECIPROC (RC; size 40/0.06), and the SAF (2 mm). Roots were then sectioned 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex, and observed under stereomicroscope, for presence of dentinal defects. "No defect" was defined as root dentin that presented with no visible microcracks or fractures. "Defect" was defined by microcracks or fractures in the root dentin. Results: The control, HF, and SAF did not exhibit any dentinal defects. In roots instrumented by RS, PTN, WO, and RC files exhibited microcracks (incomplete or complete) in 40%, 30%, 55%, and 50%, respectively. Conclusions: The motor-driven root canal instrumentation with rotary and reciprocating files may create microcracks in radicular dentine, whereas the stainless-steel hand file instrumentation, and the SAF produce minimal or less cracks.

5.
J Conserv Dent ; 21(6): 642-645, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30546211

RESUMEN

Aim: The aim is to test the antimicrobial activity of Andrographis Paniculata, Azadirachta indica (neem), and Curcuma Longa (curcumin) as a root canal irrigant, against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans using agar diffusion test. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) served as a standard control for comparisons. Materials and Methods: The bacterial strains of C. albicans and S. aureus culture were grown overnight (18-20 h) in the brain heart infusion broth at 37°C and inoculated in Mueller-Hinton agar plates. Antibacterial inhibition was assessed using agar well-diffusion method using the methanolic extracts of the three plants to be tested and NaOCl. Bacterial inhibition zone around each well was recorded. The results were tabulated and analyzed statistically for significance. Results: The novel A. paniculata showed significantly higher zone of inhibition against C. albicans (P < 0.0001) compared to the experimental irrigants. Against S. aureus, it exhibited similar results as that shown by NaOCl (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Zones of inhibition exhibited by novel herbal agent A. paniculata were higher against C. albicans and similar against S. aureus, when compared to NaOCl.

6.
SAGE Open Med ; 6: 2050312118801707, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30364748

RESUMEN

Objectives: Varying statin exposures in bacteremic patients have different impacts on mortality. Among patients with adherent statin use, we sought to evaluate the impact of statin continuation on inpatient mortality in bacteremic patients. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Optum ClinformaticsTM with matched Premier Hospital data (October 2009-March 2013). Patients with a primary diagnosis of bacteremia and 6 months of continuous enrollment prior to the admission, receiving antibiotics at least 2 days of antibiotics during the first 3 days of admission, were selected for inclusion. Furthermore, patients demonstrating adherent statin use based on 90 days of continuous therapy prior to admission were included. We then compared those continuing statin therapy for at least the first 5 days after admission and those not continuing during the admission. Results: Simvastatin (53.2%) and atorvastatin (33.8%) were the most commonly used statins among the 633 patients who met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Propensity score adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models demonstrated significantly lower inpatient mortality among those continuing statin therapy compared with those not continuing (n = 232 vs 401, adjusted hazard ratio 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.08-0.79). Conclusion: Among patients adherent to their statin therapy prior to a bacteremia hospitalization, continued statin use after admission increased survival by 75% compared with those not continuing.

7.
Ther Adv Infect Dis ; 5(5): 83-90, 2018 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30224951

RESUMEN

Background: Evidence suggests statins may improve survival in patients with bloodstream infections. However, there is no consensus on optimal timing and duration of exposure. Objectives: To quantify statin therapy duration associated with decreased mortality in bacteremic statin users. Methods: We conducted a case-control study using OptumClinformatics™ with matched Premier hospital data (1 October 2009-31 March 2013). Cases who died during the hospitalization were matched 1:1 to survivors on disease risk scores (DRSs). Post-admission statin therapy duration was evaluated in patients with at least 90 days of pre-admission continuous statin use. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was conducted to identify the optimal duration of statin continuation which provided the lowest inpatient mortality. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of mortality. Results: We included 58 DRS matched pairs of cases and controls: 47 patients (41%) continued statin therapy during the hospital admission, 15 (32%) cases and 32 (68%) controls. The CART analysis partitioned the continuation of statin therapy at ⩾2 days, representing lower mortality for patients who continued statins for 2 days or more and higher mortality for patients who did not continue or remained on statins for only 1 day. Inpatient mortality was 76% lower among those with at least 2 days of continued statin use (odds ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.11-0.55). Conclusion: Among matched cases and controls with at least 90 days of baseline statin use prior to the admission, the continuation of statins for at least 2 days after admission demonstrated a survival benefit among bacteremic patients.

8.
J Conserv Dent ; 21(1): 52-56, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29628648

RESUMEN

Aim: The current study compared the fracture resistance of samples instrumented by two rotary files and a reciprocating file, obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 freshly extracted mandibular premolar teeth with single roots and single canals were acquired and decoronated at or below the cementoenamel junction. The samples were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15). Group 1 control (noninstrumented/obturated), and for Groups 2-4 root canal instrumentation was done by EndoStar E5 (EE5), ProTaper NEXT (PTN), and WaveOne, respectively. Following instrumentation, the samples were obturated using gutta-percha cones and AH Plus sealer using lateral compaction. A week later, vertical load was applied to the specimen's canal in each group until fracture. The loads required for fracture were recorded and statistically analyzed. Results: The mean loads required to fracture (Newton; N) for the four groups were; 388.54 (±29.93), 310.35 (±26.05), 328.40 (±20.67), and 278.54 (±34.16). The loads exhibited highly significant difference (P < 0.0001; analysis variance). The following Tukey's post hoc test confirmed, both samples in Groups 2 and 3 required similar loads for fracture (P > 0.05) and significantly higher than Group 4 (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The samples instrumented by EE5 and PTN exhibit similar fracture resistance.

9.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 4(1): e1, 2018 Jan 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29305342

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues drug safety communications (DSCs) to health care professionals, patients, and the public when safety issues emerge related to FDA-approved drug products. These safety messages are disseminated through social media to ensure broad uptake. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the social media dissemination of 2 DSCs released in 2013 for the sleep aid zolpidem. METHODS: We used the MedWatcher Social program and the DataSift historic query tool to aggregate Twitter and Facebook posts from October 1, 2012 through August 31, 2013, a period beginning approximately 3 months before the first DSC and ending 3 months after the second. Posts were categorized as (1) junk, (2) mention, and (3) adverse event (AE) based on a score between -0.2 (completely unrelated) to 1 (perfectly related). We also looked at Google Trends data and Wikipedia edits for the same time period. Google Trends search volume is scaled on a range of 0 to 100 and includes "Related queries" during the relevant time periods. An interrupted time series (ITS) analysis assessed the impact of DSCs on the counts of posts with specific mention of zolpidem-containing products. Chow tests for known structural breaks were conducted on data from Twitter, Facebook, and Google Trends. Finally, Wikipedia edits were pulled from the website's editorial history, which lists all revisions to a given page and the editor's identity. RESULTS: In total, 174,286 Twitter posts and 59,641 Facebook posts met entry criteria. Of those, 16.63% (28,989/174,286) of Twitter posts and 25.91% (15,453/59,641) of Facebook posts were labeled as junk and excluded. AEs and mentions represented 9.21% (16,051/174,286) and 74.16% (129,246/174,286) of Twitter posts and 5.11% (3,050/59,641) and 68.98% (41,138/59,641) of Facebook posts, respectively. Total daily counts of posts about zolpidem-containing products increased on Twitter and Facebook on the day of the first DSC; Google searches increased on the week of the first DSC. ITS analyses demonstrated variability but pointed to an increase in interest around the first DSC. Chow tests were significant (P<.0001) for both DSCs on Facebook and Twitter, but only the first DSC on Google Trends. Wikipedia edits occurred soon after each DSC release, citing news articles rather than the DSC itself and presenting content that needed subsequent revisions for accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: Social media offers challenges and opportunities for dissemination of the DSC messages. The FDA could consider strategies for more actively disseminating DSC safety information through social media platforms, particularly when announcements require updating. The FDA may also benefit from directly contributing content to websites like Wikipedia that are frequently accessed for drug-related information.

10.
J Conserv Dent ; 20(4): 241-244, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29259360

RESUMEN

Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the vertical force required to fracture mandibular incisor teeth, obturated using gutta-percha with three different sealers. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted mandibular incisors with intact and fully formed apices, exhibiting single root and canal were acquired. The teeth were decoronated obtaining a root segments of 15 mm and were divided into five groups (n = 15). Group 1: left uninstrumented and unfilled (negative control). For groups 2-5, samples were instrumented using Protaper NEXT (X1 and X2). Group 2: left unobturated (positive control). Groups 3-5 were obturated using lateral compaction by gutta-percha and three sealers (AH Plus®, Apexit®, and EndoSequence® BioCeramic™). All the samples were prepared for fracture testing and vertical load was applied till fracture. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test, for the data recorded of the force required in Newton (N). Results: The load required to fracture exhibited a significant difference. The intergroup analysis revealed, samples obturated using bioceramic sealer exhibited higher fracture resistance (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The use of gutta-percha and a root canal sealer reinforces the root dentin, leading to increased fracture resistance against vertical forces. Bioceramic sealer group in them exhibited better results.

11.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 18(11): 1040-1044, 2017 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29109318

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: To assess the amount of debris extruded apically during instrumentation of distal canals of extracted primary molars by three instrument systems [ProTaper Universal (PTU), ProTaper NEXT (PTN), and self-adjusting file (SAF)] compared with conventional stainless steel hand K-files (HF, control). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary mandibular molars (n = 120) with a single distal canal were selected and randomly divided into four groups (n = 30) for root canal instrumentation using group I, HF (to size 0.30/0.02 taper), group II, PTU (to size F3), group III, PTN (to size X3), and group IV, SAF. Debris extruded during instrumentation was collected in preweighed Eppendorf tubes, stored in an incubator at 70°C for 5 days and then weighed. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Turkey's post hoc test (p = 0.05). RESULTS: All the groups resulted in extrusion of debris. There was statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) in the debris extrusion between the three groups: HF (0.00133 ± 0.00012), PTU (0.00109 ± 0.00005), PTN (0.00052 ± 0.00008), and SAF (0.00026 ± 0.00004). CONCLUSION: Instrumentation with SAF resulted in the least debris extrusion when used for shaping root canals of primary molar teeth. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Debris extrusion in primary teeth poses an adverse effect on the stem cells and may also alter the permanent dental germ. Debris extrusion is rarely reported for primary teeth and it is important for the clinician to know which endodontic instrumentation leads to less extrusion of debris.


Asunto(s)
Instrumentos Dentales , Diente Molar , Preparación del Conducto Radicular/instrumentación , Diente Primario , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos , Técnicas In Vitro , Distribución Aleatoria
12.
J Conserv Dent ; 20(2): 81-85, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28855752

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To compare the relative axis modification and canal concentricity after glide path preparation with 20/0.02 hand K-file (NITIFLEX®) and 20/0.04 rotary file (HyFlex™ CM) with subsequent instrumentation with 1.5 mm self-adjusting file (SAF). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty ISO 15, 0.02 taper, Endo Training Blocks (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) were acquired and randomly divided into following two groups (n = 60): group 1, establishing glide path till 20/0.02 hand K-file (NITIFLEX®) followed by instrumentation with 1.5 mm SAF; and Group 2, establishing glide path till 20/0.04 rotary file (HyFlex™ CM) followed by instrumentation with 1.5 mm SAF. Pre- and post-instrumentation digital images were processed with MATLAB R 2013 software to identify the central axis, and then superimposed using digital imaging software (Picasa 3.0 software, Google Inc., California, USA) taking five landmarks as reference points. Student's t-test for pairwise comparisons was applied with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS: Training blocks instrumented with 20/0.04 rotary file and SAF were associated less deviation in canal axis (at all the five marked points), representing better canal concentricity compared to those, in which glide path was established by 20/0.02 hand K-files followed by SAF instrumentation. CONCLUSION: Canal geometry is better maintained after SAF instrumentation with a prior glide path established with 20/0.04 rotary file.

13.
J Conserv Dent ; 20(2): 110-114, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28855758

RESUMEN

AIM: The aim of this study was to test the effect of new protocol of glide path preparation by 20/0.04 rotary file on apical extrusion of debris when instrumenting fine curved mesial canals in mandibular molars with Self-adjusting File (SAF) and compare it to a glide path prepared by 20/0.02 hand K-file and rotary OneShape (OS) and reciprocating WaveOne (WO) file instrumentation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty mandibular molars with curved mesial roots were selected and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20) for instrumentation. In two groups, glide path was prepared using 20/0.02 K-file for instrumentation by OS (size 25/0.06 taper) and WO (size 25/0.08 taper) files; in the remaining group, 20/0.04 rotary file was used for glide path preparation and instrumented by SAF (1.5 mm). The debris extruded during instrumentation was collected in preweighed Eppendorf tubes and stored in an incubator at 70°C for 5 days. Tubes containing the dry extruded debris were then weighed. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to the weights obtained, followed by Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparison. RESULTS: The mean debris (g) extruded apically was 0.000651 ± 0.000291, 0.000823 ± 0.000319, and 0.000473 ± 0.000238 for Group 1 (20/0.02 + OS), Group 2 (20/0.02 + WO), and Group 3 (20/0.04 + SAF), respectively. The groups exhibited a significant difference (P < 0.01; ANOVA). Group 3 resulted in least debris extrusion compared to Groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.01; Tukey's post hoc test). CONCLUSION: Glide path prepared to size 20/0.04 and SAF 1.5 mm instrumentation produce less debris in curved mesial canals of mandibular molars, compared to glide path established by 20/0.02 and instrumentation by OS and WO files.

14.
Imaging Sci Dent ; 47(1): 33-37, 2017 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28361027

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Haller cells and accessory maxillary ostium (AMO) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to analyze the relationships among Haller cells, AMO, and maxillary sinusitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Volumetric CBCT scans from 201 patients were retrieved from our institution's Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine archive folder. Two observers evaluated the presence of Haller cells, AMO, and maxillary sinusitis in the CBCT scans. RESULTS: AMO was observed in 114 patients, of whom 27 (23.7%) had AMO exclusively on the right side, 26 (22.8%) only on the left side, and 61 (53.5%) bilaterally. Haller cells were identified in 73 (36.3%) patients. In 24 (32.9%) they were present exclusively on the right side, in 17 (23.3%) they were only present on the left side, and in 32 (43.8%) they were located bilaterally. Of the 73 (36.3%) patients with Haller cells, maxillary sinusitis was also present in 50 (68.5%). On using chi-square test, a significant association was observed between AMO and maxillary sinusitis in the presence of Haller cells. CONCLUSION: Our results showed AMO and Haller cells to be associated with maxillary sinusitis. This study provides evidence for the usefulness of CBCT in imaging the bony anatomy of the sinonasal complex with significantly higher precision and a smaller radiation dose.

15.
Dent Traumatol ; 33(4): 276-280, 2017 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28296040

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND/AIMS: There is a paucity of literature on external auditory canal (EAC) fractures secondary to maxillofacial trauma, with most of the literature on EAC fractures consisting of isolated case reports. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first study to use cone beam computed tomography to evaluate the EAC region. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of external auditory canal (EAC) fracture following maxillofacial trauma and to evaluate the association between EAC fracture and other maxillofacial fractures and the region of trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred patients were prospectively evaluated over 6 months from February to August 2016. The patients were referred for CBCT regarding temporomandibular joint or condylar fractures following maxillofacial trauma. Two observers (both experienced radiologists) assessed the EAC and associated fractures in the maxillofacial region. RESULTS: External auditory canal (EAC) fracture was confirmed in 32% of the patients. Of the EAC fractures, 68.75% and 31.25% were associated with mandibular fractures and non-mandibular fractures, respectively. Of the EAC fractures, 68.75% were single fractures and 31.25% of patients had multiple comminuted fractures. Significant association was observed on cross-tabulation of the fractured region and region of trauma with the presence of EAC fracture using chi-square test. CONCLUSION: External auditory canal (EAC) fracture is associated with maxillofacial fractures with increased incidence in mandibular fractures compared to non-mandibular fractures.


Asunto(s)
Tomografía Computarizada de Haz Cónico , Conducto Auditivo Externo/lesiones , Fracturas Mandibulares/diagnóstico por imagen , Traumatismos Maxilofaciales/diagnóstico por imagen , Fracturas Craneales/diagnóstico por imagen , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , India/epidemiología , Masculino , Fracturas Mandibulares/epidemiología , Traumatismos Maxilofaciales/epidemiología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Estudios Prospectivos , Fracturas Craneales/epidemiología
16.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 17(1): e3751, 13/01/2017. tab
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS, BBO - Odontología | ID: biblio-914439

RESUMEN

Objective: To determine the prevalence of dental developmental anomalies among patients visiting the dental clinics at Ajman University, United Arab Emirates. Material and Methods: This retrospective study consisted of 425 digital panoramic radiographs. The study sample included people in the United Arab Emirates who have visited the outpatient dental clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, at Ajman University. These OPGs have been evaluated for the presence of dental anomalies such as: Macrodontia, Microdontia, Talon cusp, Taurodontism, Dilaceration, Ectopic Eruption, Supernumerary teeth or roots, Fusion, Gemination, and Concrescense. Results: 80.7% had at least 1 anomaly, with the maximum of 5 anomalies presented in 1.2% of the sample. Dilacerations were the most commonly identified anomaly (61.4%), followed by missing third molars (22.8%), and Ectopic Eruption (15.5%) where (12.9%) of this anomaly has affected the maxillary canines. Hypercementosis (10.2%) followed by Microdontia (4.6%), which was mostly seen in the Upper laterals. Taurodontism accounted for (4.1%), Macrodontia (2.3%) and Talon cusp (2.3%). Gemination, Dens Invaginatus, and Concrescence were separately present in 1.1%, each one, of the cases observed. Conclusion: Variations in data and results among different studies suggest the impact of racial, genetic and environmental factors. The high frequency of dental anomalies emphasize the need of early detection and diagnosis which can be achieved through radiographic imaging, this would aid in further awareness to minimize any means of complexity in dental problems.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Niño , Adolescente , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Anomalías Dentarias/diagnóstico , Diente Supernumerario , Emiratos Árabes Unidos/etnología , Radiografía Panorámica/instrumentación , Brasil/etnología , Estudios Epidemiológicos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Radiografía Dental Digital/instrumentación
17.
J Conserv Dent ; 19(2): 125-9, 2016.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27099416

RESUMEN

AIM: This study evaluated whether using supplementary files for removing root canal filling residues after ProTaper Universal Retreatment files (RFs) increased the debris extrusion apically. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty mandibular premolars with single root and canal were instrumented with ProTaper Universal rotary system (SX-F3) and obturated. The samples were divided randomly into four groups (n = 20). Group 1 served as a control; only ProTaper Universal RFs D1-D3 were used, and the extruded debris was weighed. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were the experimental groups, receiving a twofold retreatment protocol: Removal of the bulk, followed by the use of supplementary files. The bulk was removed by RFs, followed by the use of ProTaper NEXT (PTN), WaveOne (WO), and Self-Adjusting File (SAF) for removal of the remaining root filling residues. Debris extruded apically were weighed and compared to the control group. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey's test. RESULTS: All the three experimental groups presented significant difference (P < .01). The post hoc Tukey's test confirmed that Group 4 (SAF) exhibited significantly less (P < .01) debris extrusion between the three groups tested. CONCLUSION: SAF results in less extrusion of debris when used as supplementary file to remove root-filling residues, compared to WO and PTN.

18.
J Conserv Dent ; 19(2): 138-42, 2016.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27099419

RESUMEN

AIM: Current ex vivo study compared fracture resistance of teeth instrumented using 5 endodontic files, filled with Gutta-percha and AH Plus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty freshly extracted, single-rooted mandibular premolars were acquired and decoronated to obtain 15 mm segments. These samples were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Group 1 served as the control containing untreated samples (without instrumentation or filling). In Groups 2-6, samples were instrumented using rotary (Universal ProTaper and Revo-S), reciprocating (WaveOne and RECIPROC(®)), and self-adjusting file (SAF), respectively. Following instrumentation, the samples were filled by lateral compaction with Gutta-percha and AH Plus. A week later, after the sealer was completely set, a vertical load was applied to the specimen's canal in each group until fracture. The loads required for fracture were recorded, and statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: The mean fracture load differed significantly among the groups (P < 0.01; one-way ANOVA). Tukey's post-hoc tests revealed that the fracture resistance was similar in the control and SAF groups (P > 0.05) and was significantly higher than that of the 2 rotary and reciprocating groups (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The samples instrumented by the SAF exhibited a better fracture resistance.

19.
J Conserv Dent ; 19(1): 72-6, 2016.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26957798

RESUMEN

AIM: The current ex vivo study compared the efficacy of removing root fillings using ProTaper retreatment files followed by either WaveOne reciprocating file or the Self-Adjusting File (SAF). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty maxillary canines with single oval root canal were selected and sectioned to obtain 18-mm root segments. The root canals were instrumented with WaveOne primary files, followed by obturation using warm lateral compaction, and the sealer was allowed to fully set. The teeth were then divided into two equal groups (N = 20). Initial removal of the bulk of root filling material was performed with ProTaper retreatment files, followed by either WaveOne files (Group 1) or SAF (Group 2). Endosolv R was used as a gutta-percha softener. Preoperative and postoperative high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the volume of the root filling residue that was left after the procedure. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test. RESULTS: The mean volume of root filling residue in Group 1 was 9.4 (±0.5) mm(3), whereas in Group 2 the residue volume was 2.6 (±0.4) mm(3), (P < 0.001; t-test). CONCLUSIONS: When SAF was used after ProTaper retreatment files, significantly less root filling residue was left in the canals compared to when WaveOne was used.

20.
J Conserv Dent ; 18(2): 89-93, 2015.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25829683

RESUMEN

AIM: The present ex vivo study aimed to evaluate the debris extrusion after instrumenting the root canals by three different files systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty extracted human mandibular premolars with single canals were selected and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20) for instrumentation with three different files. Group 1: WaveOne (primary) single reciprocating file (WO; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) (25/08), Group 2: Self-adjusting file (SAF; ReDent-Nova, Ra'anana, Israel) (1.5 mm), and Group 3: ProTaper NEXT X1 and X2 (PTN; Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) (25/06). Debris extruding by instrumentation were collected into pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes. These tubes were then stored in an incubator at 70°C for 5 days. The tubes were then weighed to obtain the final weight, with the extruded debris. Statistical analysis for the debris extruded apically was performed using one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey's test. RESULTS: The statistical analysis showed a significant difference between all the three groups tested (P < 0.01). The following post hoc Tukey's test confirmed that Group 2 (SAF) exhibited significantly least (P < 0.01) debris extrusion between the three groups tested. CONCLUSIONS: The SAF resulted in significantly less extrusion of debris when compared to reciprocating WO and rotary PTN.

SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...