Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 40
Filtrar
Más filtros










Base de datos
Intervalo de año de publicación
1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31907520
2.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 2019 Jul 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31337541

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Despite years of research and numerous policies, access to contraceptives in the United States remains imperfect. Largely due to lack of access to contraceptives, unintended pregnancy rates remain high. OBJECTIVE: To provide researchers and policy-makers with a comprehensive review of the legislative and social landscape that has shaped contraceptive access in the United States, which may help to guide future research and policies. METHODS: A narrative overview of existing literature on policies and research regarding women's access to contraceptives was compiled, with a focus on the role of pharmacists. RESULTS: Contraceptive access has been heavily influenced by laws and policies throughout the years, and disparities remain in underserved populations. Pharmacists are beginning to play a role in improving access to contraceptives through provision of contraceptives using direct pharmacy access policies. CONCLUSIONS: Continued research and new policies aimed at improving contraceptive access are warranted.

3.
Pharmacy (Basel) ; 7(2)2019 Apr 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31013900

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To describe a unique pharmacy intern program in a group of federally qualified health center (FQHC) outpatient primary care provider clinics. SUMMARY: A pharmacy intern program was created at the North Central Nursing Clinics in Indiana, a group of four FQHC outpatient primary care provider facilities. Intern-performed tasks included: Prior authorization (PA) requests, medication assistance program (MAP) applications, sample procurement and inventory, and contraceptive devices for implantation inventory management. Interns interacted with clinic administration, nurse practitioners, and medical staff to complete their assigned responsibilities. Over a one-year period, the interns completed documentation on more than 2000 charts during a combined 12 h a week. Interns identified the interprofessional interactions as the most beneficial experience, while providers acknowledged no difference in the processing of paperwork during the transition of duties from pharmacy fellow to intern. CONCLUSION: This unique pharmacy intern program was successfully created and implemented in a primary care provider office, resulting in learning opportunities for pharmacy interns, as well as operational efficiencies to fellows, providers, and the organization.

4.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(2): 6864, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30962643

RESUMEN

Objective. To determine the current state of employment for doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) graduates based on 5-year trends among graduates of research-intensive institutions and the Pharmacist Demand Index. Methods. Data from a cross-sectional survey of PharmD graduates from 10 research-intensive colleges of pharmacy conducted over a 5-year period were used to generate an overview of graduating students' experiences and the outcomes of their job searches. Results. The average response rate of graduates of programs over the 5 years was 75.4%. Overall, 86% of graduates had postgraduate placements (ie, jobs, residencies, fellowships, further education) at the time of graduation. Across all years, 85% of respondents who had placements indicated they were satisfied with the postgraduation offer they received. Conclusion. An examination of postgraduate outcomes of research-intensive schools and the Pharmacist Demand Indicator over the past 5 years indicates a trend toward a balance between the supply and demand for pharmacists. Careful attention needs to be given to these two metrics moving forward.

5.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(2): 145-154, 2019 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30733010

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To describe the relationship between the use of a teaching objective structured clinical examination (TOSCE) and student confidence in a pharmacy skills laboratory. METHODS: To develop students' abilities in providing recommendations and patient education on selected drug products, third-year pharmacy students participated in a TOSCE in a men's and women's health laboratory. A 19-item, 5-point Likert scale survey was administered longitudinally to assess student confidence (1 = not all confident to 5 = extremely confident). An additional seven items (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree) were added to the original 19-item survey to measure changes in confidence and attitude before and after a problem-based assessment. RESULTS: Seventy-two students completed all five surveys administered throughout the semester. Students' confidence improved in multiple areas within the clinical skills and interpersonal communication skills categories. Students also indicated their confidence in using primary literature, electronic drug references, and package inserts to answer medication-related questions improved after the TOSCE implementation. Students agreed that the feedback they received from the TOSCE was beneficial to their performance on a problem-based assessment. CONCLUSIONS: A TOSCE is a formative assessment that has the potential to improve student confidence in core competency areas immediately after an activity. However, its benefit may be short-term when a time gap exists. Further study is needed to assess long-term sustainability in student confidence over multiple laboratory activities throughout a semester.

6.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 10(9): 1237-1242, 2018 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30497627

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nurses and pharmacists are essential healthcare team members and must collaborate to provide safe and effective patient care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nursing and pharmacy student views on interprofessional collaboration after completing an educational activity. INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY: Students participated in an interprofessional activity designed to improve empathy toward older adults and completed an open-ended questionnaire post-activity regarding their experience and views on interprofessional collaboration. Content analysis identified themes grounded in the responses. Students (n = 216) felt communication needed improvement (n = 31, 16.8%), were frustrated with fragmented care (n = 31, 16.8%), found interprofessional collaboration necessary (n = 37, 20.1%), and enjoyed the interprofessional experience (n = 17, 9.2%). DISCUSSION: Study results provide evidence for the inclusion of additional structured interprofessional activities into all health professions curriculum to emphasize collaboration, improve communication, and modify views in preparation for interprofessional practice.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum/normas , Educación en Enfermería/normas , Educación en Farmacia/normas , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Conducta Cooperativa , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación en Enfermería/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto/métodos , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 10(10): 1342-1347, 2018 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30527363

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Information on effective and replicable methods employed in pharmacy and other college students to combat stigmatizing beliefs toward those with mental illness is limited. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is an international, standardized, eight-hour course focused on helping members of the general public triage a mental health crisis. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of MHFA training on stigmatizing attitudes toward those with mental illness among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: Pharmacy and non-pharmacy students were invited to voluntarily participate in one of two MHFA sessions. A survey utilizing the Social Distance Scale (SDS) and Attitudes to Mental Illness Questionnaire (AMIQ) was given to participants before and after the MHFA session to assess change in stigmatizing behavior. FINDINGS: Thirty-four pharmacy students and 21 non-pharmacy students participated in the study. Overall, stigma toward depression and schizophrenia decreased. For the SDS schizophrenia vignette, a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05) was seen on six of the seven responses for pharmacy students and on four responses in non-pharmacy students. Both pharmacy and non-pharmacy students improved on one item in the SDS depression vignette. For the AMIQ, pharmacy students demonstrated statistically significant improvement on four items in the schizophrenia vignette and five items in the depression vignette. Non-pharmacy students showed improvement on two items for both the AMIQ schizophrenia and depression vignettes. DISCUSSION AND SUMMARY: MHFA was effective in decreasing stigmatizing beliefs among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. These findings support the utilization of teaching methods that emphasize the patient experience and humanize mental illness.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Estigma Social , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Primeros Auxilios/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/complicaciones , Trastornos Mentales/diagnóstico , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades/organización & administración , Universidades/estadística & datos numéricos
8.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 9(6): 996-1002, 2017 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29233397

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: In previous research, investigators have expressed concern about the ethical ambivalence of pharmacists in decision-making. The objectives of this study were to examine student pharmacists': 1) attitudes and responses regarding specific common ethical situations and 2) perceived level of difficulty in making ethical decisions. METHODS: A self-administered 38-item survey was given to second and third year student pharmacists at Purdue University. The survey comprised five sections, including: 1) attitudes towards common ethical situations, 2) responses to specific ethical scenarios, 3) emergency lending, 4) perceived level of difficulty in resolving ethical dilemmas, and 5) demographics. RESULTS: Over 90% of students agreed or strongly agreed that pharmacists have the right to refuse to dispense a medication for clinical reasons, while 45.3% agreed or strongly agreed that pharmacists had the right to refuse to dispense for moral or religious reasons. Greater than 20% of students were undecided about dispensing syringes without a prescription, pseudoephedrine tablets to a frequent purchaser, and lethal doses of narcotics. In eight out of nine cases involving ethical decision-making, over 70% of students perceived the decision to be somewhat problematic. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Exploration of student pharmacists' perceptions of specific ethical situations assists in identifying areas of uncertainty in decision-making and informing educational interventions that may foster ethical development of future pharmacy professionals.


Asunto(s)
Toma de Decisiones/ética , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Ética Médica/educación , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Principios Morales , Percepción , Autoadministración , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
9.
Pharmacotherapy ; 37(11): 1458-1468, 2017 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28891099

RESUMEN

Pediatric opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal are avoidable complications of pain and sedation management that is well described in the literature. To prevent withdrawal from occurring, practitioners regularly use a steady decrease of pain and sedation medications, also known as a weaning or tapering schedule. The weaning schedule is highly variable based on clinician preference and is usually dependent on the clinician. The purposes of this review are to evaluate the current literature on the process of opioid and benzodiazepine weaning in pediatric patients and to assess the various standardized protocols used to decrease withdrawal occurrences. We conducted a search of the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Academic Search Premier, and PsycInfo databases. Studies were included if they described a wean or taper in pediatric patients aged 18 years or younger. Studies describing neonatal abstinence syndrome were excluded from the review. A total of 97 studies published between 2000 and 2014 were retrieved; of those, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were evaluated for selection of withdrawal assessment tool, wean protocol summary, preferred weaning agents, benzodiazepine withdrawal, and wean-at-home regimen. The most common opioid-weaning protocol approaches described a 10-20% dose decrease per day. Benzodiazepine weaning was not regularly standardized or described. The use of a standardized opioid-weaning protocol reduced withdrawal rates compared with nonstandardized weaning plans. Benzodiazepine weaning was inconsistently evaluated and may have affected study outcomes. Identified areas of improvement include the use of newer withdrawal assessment tools validated in the older pediatric population and standardized withdrawal assessment and reporting.


Asunto(s)
Analgésicos Opioides/administración & dosificación , Benzodiazepinas/administración & dosificación , Síndrome de Abstinencia a Sustancias/prevención & control , Adolescente , Analgésicos Opioides/efectos adversos , Benzodiazepinas/efectos adversos , Niño , Preescolar , Esquema de Medicación , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Dolor/tratamiento farmacológico
10.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 57(2): 170-177.e1, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28089520

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: 1) To explore the association between family caregivers' involvement in managing care recipients' medications and their information-seeking behavior related to caregiving; and 2) to examine the sources used by caregivers when seeking information. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from 2 national studies, the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and its supplement, the National Study of Caregiving (NSOC), was conducted. A nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults (≥65 years of age) completed NHATS interviews, and a sample of their family caregivers participated in NSOC. Caregiver involvement in medication management was assessed with the use of 2 items asking caregivers if they helped keep track of care recipients' medications or helped with injecting medications. Information seeking was assessed with the use of an item asking caregivers if they ever looked for caregiving-related information. RESULTS: Out of 1367 caregivers interviewed, 54% reported helping to keep track of care recipients' medications and 8.7% assisting with injecting medications. Approximately 10.2% (n = 149) of caregivers reported seeking information to help them care for their care recipients. Caregivers sought information primarily on their own either through online resources or asking friends or relatives (73.3%). Sixty-four percent also sought information from medical providers or social workers. Adult children of caregivers were more likely to seek information for their older adult parents, based on bivariate analysis (P <0.01). In multivariable-adjusted models, caregivers who helped to keep track of medications had 2.30 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18 to 4.51) times higher odds of seeking information to help them to provide care for their care recipients. Caregivers helping with injecting medications were less likely to seek information (odds ratio 0.32, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.76). CONCLUSION: Specific caregiver responsibilities, such as assisting with medication management activities, are associated with caregivers' information-seeking behavior related to care recipients' health. Health care providers, including pharmacists, can play an important role in helping caregivers to identify proper resources for information and in educating them about medication management.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Familia , Conducta en la Búsqueda de Información , Preparaciones Farmacéuticas/administración & dosificación , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Inyecciones , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Análisis Multivariante , Estudios Retrospectivos , Adulto Joven
11.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 13(4): 840-848, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27916540

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Family caregivers are actively involved in medication management, yet little is known about factors associated with caregivers' involvement in this role and how that information can be utilized to engage caregivers in the healthcare system. OBJECTIVES: To explore factors associated with caregiver involvement in various aspects of older adults' medication management (i.e., ordering, keeping track or ensuring the correct medication is taken at the correct time, and injecting medications). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of two national surveys, the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study and the National Study of Caregiving was performed. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between demographic and caregiving variables with caregiver involvement in three medication management activities. RESULTS: Approximately two-thirds of family caregivers (N = 1369) were involved in one or more medication management activities. Factors associated with caregivers' assistance with ordering medications included being female, high frequency of involvement in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), involvement in medically-related activities, and caring for an older, less educated, or Hispanic care-recipient and individuals with lung disease or dementia (p < 0.05). Caregiver living arrangement, high frequency of involvement in activities of daily living (ADLs) and IADLs, involvement in medically-related activities along with care-recipient's race/ethnicity and having a dementia diagnosis were all associated with caregiver assistance in keeping track of medications (p < 0.05). Factors associated with assistance in injecting medications were caring for older adults with diabetes or stroke, or being involved in medically-related activities (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Different demographic and caregiving factors were associated with caregiver involvement in various medication management activities. Recurring factors included race/ethnicity, certain care-recipient disease states, and caregiver involvement in IADLs and medically-related activities. Healthcare providers can play a proactive role in engaging caregivers in discussion about medication management and these findings can help practitioners more effectively target caregivers for education and support.


Asunto(s)
Envejecimiento , Cuidadores , Administración del Tratamiento Farmacológico , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Encuestas de Atención de la Salud , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Análisis Multivariante , Oportunidad Relativa , Polifarmacia , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Tiempo , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
12.
Home Healthc Now ; 34(5): 267-72, 2016 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27145408

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of telemonitoring plus education by home healthcare nurses on health-related quality of life in patients with heart failure who had varying health literacy levels. In this pretest/posttest treatment only study, 35 patients with a diagnosis of heart failure received home healthcare nurse visits, including education and telemonitoring. Heart failure education was provided by nurses at each home healthcare visit for approximately 15 to 20 minutes. All participants completed the Short-Form Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) during the first week of home healthcare services. The MLHFQ was administered again at the completion of the covered home healthcare services period (1-3 visits per week for 10 weeks). Most participants were older adults (mean age 70.91±12.47) and had adequate health literacy (51.4%). Almost half of the participants were NYHA Class III (47.1%). All participants received individual heart failure education, but this did not result in statistically significant improvements in health-related quality-of-life scores. With telemonitoring and home healthcare nurse visits, quality-of-life scores improved by the conclusion of home healthcare services (clinically significant), but the change was not statistically significant. Individuals with marginal and inadequate health literacy ability were able to correctly use the telemonitoring devices.


Asunto(s)
Alfabetización en Salud , Insuficiencia Cardíaca/terapia , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Calidad de Vida , Telemedicina/métodos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios Controlados Antes y Después , Femenino , Insuficiencia Cardíaca/enfermería , Cuidados de Enfermería en el Hogar/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(6): 88, 2015 Aug 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26430275

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To characterize postgraduation placement plans of 2013 doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) graduates. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of PharmD graduates from 8 midwestern colleges of pharmacy was designed to capture a comprehensive picture of graduating students' experiences and outcomes of their job search. RESULTS: At graduation, 81% of 2013 respondents had postgraduate plans, with approximately 40% accepting jobs and 40% accepting residencies or fellowships. Eighty-four percent of graduates reported being pleased with offers received, and 86% received placement in their preferred practice setting. Students perceived that securing residencies was more difficult than securing jobs. Students who participated in key activities had a nearly sevenfold increase in successful residency placement. CONCLUSION: While the demand for pharmacists decreased in recent years, responses indicated successful placement by the majority of 2013 graduates at the time of graduation.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Educación de Postgrado en Farmacia/métodos , Farmacéuticos , Residencias en Farmacia/métodos , Facultades de Farmacia , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/tendencias , Educación de Postgrado en Farmacia/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Medio Oeste de Estados Unidos , Farmacéuticos/tendencias , Residencias en Farmacia/tendencias , Facultades de Farmacia/tendencias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
14.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(5): 65, 2015 Jun 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26396274

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in empathy and perceptions as well as game experiences among student pharmacists participating in an aging simulation game. METHODS: First-year student pharmacists participated in an aging simulation game. Changes were measured pre/post-activity using the Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale (KCES) and Jefferson Scale of Empathy--Health Professions Scale (JSE-HPS) for empathy and the Aging Simulation Experience Survey (ASES) for perceptions of older adults' experiences and game experiences. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to determine changes. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-six student pharmacists completed the instruments. Empathy using the KCES and JSE-HPS improved significantly. Of the 13 items in the ASES, 9 significantly improved. CONCLUSION: Simulation games may help students overcome challenges demonstrating empathy and positive attitudes toward elderly patients.


Asunto(s)
Envejecimiento/psicología , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Geriatría/educación , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Empatía , Femenino , Empleos en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Simulación de Paciente , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
15.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(4): 49, 2015 May 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26089558

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To describe student pharmacists' Signature Themes from the Clifton StrengthsFinder across 5 Midwestern pharmacy institutions and to compare themes by gender, institution, and undergraduate population. METHODS: Student pharmacists completed the StrengthsFinder 2.0 assessment and received their top 5 Signature Themes. Themes were organized and examined by domains (Executing, Influencing, Relationship Building, Strategic Thinking). The distribution of the themes was compared between student pharmacists and undergraduates and themes and domains were compared by institution and gender. RESULTS: Although results varied by institution, the top 5 themes among the 1244 of 1250 students (99.5%) who completed the assessment were: Achiever, Harmony, Learner, Responsibility, and Empathy. Female student pharmacists had more themes in Executing and Relationship Building, while males had more themes in Influencing and Strategic Thinking. Pharmacy students exhibit more Executing domain talents and fewer Influencing domain talents compared with undergraduates. CONCLUSION: Signature Themes were consistent among student pharmacists across 5 Midwestern colleges of pharmacy.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Farmacia/organización & administración , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Facultades de Farmacia/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Escolaridad , Empatía , Femenino , Humanos , Relaciones Interpersonales , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Medio Oeste de Estados Unidos , Autoimagen , Factores Sexuales , Adulto Joven
16.
Nurse Educ Today ; 35(1): 38-43, 2015 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24912741

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nurses should be well-prepared to improve and address health-related needs of older adults, but students may have difficulty understanding and empathizing, as they may not yet have personally experienced aging-related challenges. Simulation games can be used to help students understand the experiences of others, but limited information is available on the impact of simulation experiences on student empathy. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the impact of participation in an aging simulation game on nursing students' empathy and attitudes toward older adults as well as their understanding of patients' experiences in the healthcare system. DESIGN: This study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design. SETTING: A school of nursing in the Midwestern United States. PARTICIPANTS: The convenience sample included 58 sophomore-level baccalaureate nursing students. METHODS: Students played the role of an older adult during a 3-hour laboratory aging simulation game, the Geriatric Medication Game® (GMG). Students completed the (1) Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale (KCES, 15 items, 7-point Likert-type), (2) Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professions Students (JSE-HPS, 20 items, 7-point Likert-type), and (3) Aging Simulation Experience Survey (13 items, 7-point Likert-type) pre- and post-game to assess study objectives. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests were performed in SPSS v.21.0, as the data were normally distributed. RESULTS: Students' empathy (N=58) toward older adults significantly improved overall (KCES p=0.015, JSE-HPS p<0.001). Improvements also were seen on seven out of 13 questions related to attitudes and healthcare understanding (p<0.05). In the post-test, students agreed that they experienced frustration and impatience during the GMG. CONCLUSIONS: Students may not be aware of older adults' feelings and experiences prior to experiencing aging-related changes themselves. Simulation activities, such as the GMG, can be a useful mechanism for addressing empathy and caring during student education.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Empatía , Geriatría/educación , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Medio Oeste de Estados Unidos , Pruebas Neuropsicológicas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 10(2): 378-86, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23953756

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: It has been argued that only 12% of adults have the necessary health literacy to manage their health care effectively, which can lead to difficulties in self-care activities, such as medication adherence. Prior research suggests that health literacy may influence knowledge, self-efficacy and self-care, but this has not been fully examined. OBJECTIVE: To test a model to explain the relationships between health literacy, heart failure knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-care. METHODS: Prior to receiving clinic-based education, newly referred patients to 3 heart failure clinics completed assessments of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, self-efficacy, self-care, and demographics. Structural equation modeling was completed to examine the strength of the inter-variable relationships. RESULTS: Of 81 participants recruited, data from 63 patients were complete. Health literacy was independently associated with knowledge (P < 0.001). Health literacy was not related to self-care. Self-efficacy was independently-associated with self-care adherence (P = 0.016). No other relationships were statistically significant. The model had good fit (comparative fit index = 1.000) and explained 33.6% of the variance in knowledge and 27.6% in self-care. CONCLUSIONS: Health literacy influences knowledge about heart failure but not self-care adherence. Instead, self-efficacy influenced self-care adherence. Future research should incorporate additional factors that may better model the relationships between health literacy, knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-care.


Asunto(s)
Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Alfabetización en Salud , Insuficiencia Cardíaca , Autocuidado , Autoeficacia , Anciano , Escolaridad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Modelos Teóricos , Cooperación del Paciente
18.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 53(6): 618-25, 2013.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24141360

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To explore student pharmacists' attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and examine factors shaping students' attitudes. DESIGN: Descriptive, exploratory, nonexperimental study. SETTING: Electronic survey of student pharmacists between March and October 2011. PARTICIPANTS: 887 student pharmacists in 10 U.S. colleges/schools of pharmacy. INTERVENTION: Cross-sectional survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Student pharmacists' attitudes regarding CAM using the attitudes toward CAM scale (15 items), attitudes toward specific CAM therapies (13 items), influence of factors (e.g., coursework, personal experience) on attitudes (18 items), and demographic characteristics (15 items). RESULTS: Mean (±SD) score on the attitudes toward CAM scale was 52.57 ± 7.65 (of a possible 75; higher score indicated more favorable attitudes). Students agreed that a patient's health beliefs should be integrated in the patient care process (4.39 ± 0.70 [of 5]) and that knowledge about CAM would be required in future pharmacy practice (4.05 ± 0.83). Scores on the attitudes toward CAM scale varied by gender (women higher than men, P = 0.001), race/ethnicity (nonwhite higher than white, P < 0.001), type of institution (private higher than public, P < 0.001), previous CAM coursework (P < 0.001), and previous CAM use (P < 0.001). Personal experience, pharmacy education (e.g., coursework and faculty attitudes), and family background were important factors shaping students' attitudes. CONCLUSION: Student pharmacists hold generally favorable views of CAM, and both personal and educational factors shape their views. These results provide insight into factors shaping future pharmacists' perceptions of CAM. Additional research is needed to examine how attitudes influence future pharmacists' confidence and willingness to talk to patients about CAM.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Terapias Complementarias/métodos , Educación en Farmacia , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Recolección de Datos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Factores Sexuales , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
19.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 9(5): 531-41, 2013.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24060233

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The average American adult reads at the 8th grade level while most written health information materials, including medication guides, are written at the 12th grade level. To assist students with health literacy-sensitive communication, pharmacy schools should incorporate educational activities addressing health literacy competencies. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of a health literacy assignment on student pharmacists' perceptions of: 1) learning about health literacy; 2) ability to write health literacy level-appropriate patient education material; and 3) the use of these skills in future pharmacy practice. METHODS: Third professional year student pharmacists were asked to rewrite a patient medication information sheet at the 5th grade reading level, altering it from the 12th grade level. Following assignment completion, students responded to a 4-item open-ended questionnaire on what they learned from the activity, what information components were the most difficult to rewrite and reason for the difficulty, key strategies to accomplish the assignment, and their perception of the impact this assignment had on their future practice. Content analysis of the reflections was performed using QSR NVivo to identify themes grounded in the students' responses. RESULTS: Reflections were completed in 2009 (n = 159) and 2010 (n = 144), for a total of 303 completed reflections. Predominant themes included greater understanding about the challenges, importance, and methods of health literacy level-appropriate communication and greater awareness of the role of pharmacists in presenting information clearly to patients. CONCLUSIONS: Students indicated the activity increased their understanding of the complexity of patient information, the educational needs of patients, and the importance of providing information that is understandable. Student pharmacists learned methods of effective communication with patients and should be better prepared to communicate in a health literacy-level appropriate manner.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia , Alfabetización en Salud , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Comunicación en Salud , Humanos , Aprendizaje
20.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 77(7): 141, 2013 Sep 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24052644

RESUMEN

Assessment has become a major aspect of accreditation processes across all of higher education. As the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) plans a major revision to the standards for doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) education, an in-depth, scholarly review of the approaches and strategies for assessment in the PharmD program accreditation process is warranted. This paper provides 3 goals and 7 recommendations to strengthen assessment in accreditation standards. The goals include: (1) simplified standards with a focus on accountability and improvement, (2) institutionalization of assessment efforts; and (3) innovation in assessment. Evolving and shaping assessment practices is not the sole responsibility of the accreditation standards. Assessment requires commitment and dedication from individual faculty members, colleges and schools, and organizations supporting the college and schools, such as the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Therefore, this paper also challenges the academy and its members to optimize assessment practices.


Asunto(s)
Academias e Institutos/normas , Acreditación/normas , Educación de Postgrado en Farmacia/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Facultades de Farmacia/normas , Docentes/normas , Humanos
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA