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2.
Am J Public Health ; 114(S2): 162-166, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38354355

RESUMEN

We assessed how hospitalists frame workplace safety, health, and well-being (SHW); their perception of hospital supports for SHW; and whether and how they are sharing leadership responsibility for each other's SHW. Our findings highlight the important role of local support for hospitalist SHW and reveal the systemic, hospital-wide problems that may impede their SHW. We believe that positioning hospitalists as leaders for SHW will result in systems-wide changes in practices to support the SHW of all care team members. (Am J Public Health. 2024;114(S2):S162-S166. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2024.307573).


Asunto(s)
Médicos Hospitalarios , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Liderazgo , Lugar de Trabajo
3.
J Occup Environ Med ; 2024 Feb 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38383950

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: We sought to test whether a two-week Total Worker Health (TWH) training mapped to TWH education competencies could be administered to a Mexican audience of occupational safety and health professionals and could lead to positive changes to knowledge and behaviors. METHODS: This study employed robust program evaluation methods collected before and after each of the nine training days and at the end of the course. RESULTS: Overall course quality received a mean score of 4.6 (SD = 0.6) and 98.8% of participants agreed that their TWH knowledge increased. All participants intended to make at least one change to their professional practice, most frequently helping companies assess their organizational culture to support health, safety, and well-being. CONCLUSIONS: This TWH training was well-received and led to positive self-reported increase in knowledge and abilities to influence workers' health, safety, and wellbeing.

4.
J Occup Environ Med ; 65(9): 769-774, 2023 09 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37278150

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Sufficient sleep is essential for well-being. We examined the relationship between work-related social support, work stress, and sleep sufficiency, predicting that workers with higher social support would report higher sleep sufficiency across varying levels of work stress. METHODS: The data set analyzed in the present study included 2213 workers from approximately 200 small (<500 employees) businesses in high, medium, and low hazard industries across Colorado. RESULTS: Perceived social support variables moderated the relationship between work stress and sleep sufficiency such that employees reporting higher levels of social support reported higher sleep sufficiency when work stress was low or moderate but not high. CONCLUSIONS: Although preventing work stress is optimal, in cases where employers cannot apply primary interventions to prevent stress (eg, eliminating/reducing night shifts), employers should attempt to increase social support or other more relevant resources for employees.


Asunto(s)
Estrés Laboral , Sueño , Humanos , Lugar de Trabajo , Apoyo Social , Colorado
5.
J Occup Environ Med ; 65(5): e290-e297, 2023 05 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36808123

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to investigate the organizational, supervisor, team, and individual factors associated with employee and leader perceptions of shared Total Worker Health (TWH) transformational leadership in teams. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 14 teams across three construction companies. Results: Shared TWH transformational leadership in teams was associated with employees and leaders' perceptions of support from coworkers. Other factors were also associated it, but it differed by position. Conclusions: We found that leaders may be focused on the mechanics of sharing TWH transformational leadership responsibilities and workers may be more focused on their internal cognitive abilities and motivations. Our results suggest the potential ways of promoting shared TWH transformational leadership among construction teams.


Asunto(s)
Industria de la Construcción , Liderazgo , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Cognición , Motivación
6.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1039, 2022 05 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35610627

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Leadership commitment to worker safety and health is one of the most important factors when organizations develop and implement a Total Worker Health® approach. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of a Total Worker Health ("TWH") leadership development program that targeted owners and other senior-level leadership positions on changing organizational and worker outcomes from baseline to one-year later. METHODS: The Small + Safe + Well study included small businesses from a variety of industries in the state of Colorado, USA that were participating in Health Links™. We designed a randomized waitlisted control comparison design (RCT) to evaluate the added benefit of a TWH leadership development program. An employer assessment tool was used to assess TWH policies and programs, and an employee health and safety survey was used to assess safety leadership and health leadership practices, safety climate and health climate, safety behaviors and health behaviors, and well-being. We used a linear mixed model framework with random effects for business and employee to assess the impact of intervention on the outcomes of interest. RESULTS: Thirty-six businesses (37% retention) and 250 employees (9% retention) met the RCT study inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Businesses improved their TWH policies and programs score from baseline to one-year later, regardless of leadership intervention group assignment. Neither intervention group demonstrated improvements in employee-reported outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This study sought to address a gap in the literature regarding small business senior leadership development for TWH. Our study demonstrates many of the challenges of conducting studies focused on organizational change in workplaces, specifically in small businesses. When designing TWH intervention studies, researchers should consider how to best engage small business leaders in interventions and implementations early on, as well as methods that are well matched to measuring primary and secondary outcomes longitudinally. Future research is needed to test the feasibility and sustainability of TWH interventions in small business. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was retrospectively registered with ClinicalTrials.gov ( ID U19OH011227 ).


Asunto(s)
Salud Laboral , Pequeña Empresa , Humanos , Liderazgo , Innovación Organizacional , Lugar de Trabajo
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 838417, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35462804

RESUMEN

In the present study, we describe the job demands and job resources (JD-R) experienced by agricultural workers in three Latin American countries and their relationship to proactive health behaviors at work and overall health. Following previous research on the JD-R model, we hypothesized that job demands (H1) would be negatively related to agricultural workers' self-reported overall health. On the other hand, we hypothesized that job resources (H2) would be positively related to agricultural workers' overall health. Furthermore, we hypothesized (H3) that workers' engagement in jobsite health promotion practices via their proactive health behaviors at work would partially mediate the relationship between workers' job resources and job demands and overall health. We also had a research question (R1) about whether there were differences by type of job held. The sample of workers who participated in this study (N = 1,861) worked in Mexico, Guatemala, and Nicaragua for one large agribusiness that produces sugar cane. They worked in two distinct areas: company administration and agricultural operations. We administered employee health and safety culture surveys using survey methods tailored to meet the needs of both types of workers. Stratified path analysis models were used to test study hypotheses. In general, we found support for hypotheses 1 and 2. For example, operations workers reported more physically demanding jobs and administrative workers reported more work-related stress. Regardless, the existence of high job demands was associated with poorer overall health amongst both types of workers. We found that workers in more health-supportive work environments perform more proactive health behaviors at work, regardless of their role within the organization. However, hypothesis 3 was not supported as proactive health behaviors at work was not associated with overall health. We discuss future research needs in terms of evaluating these hypotheses amongst workers employed by small- and medium-sized agribusinesses as well as those in the informal economy in Latin America. We also discuss important implications for agribusinesses seeking to develop health promotion programs that meet the needs of all workers.


Asunto(s)
Agricultores , Salud Laboral , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , América Latina , Lugar de Trabajo
8.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35162408

RESUMEN

The role of dissemination and implementation (D&I) science is critical to the translation of Total Worker Health® into practice and to the success of interventions in addressing current and future implications for worker safety, health, and well-being. D&I frameworks can guide researchers to design Total Worker Health ("TWH") delivery approaches that use flexible implementation strategies to implement the core components of programs for employers with varying contextual factors, including small/mid/large-sized businesses and different industry types. To date, there have been very few examples of applying implementation frameworks for the translation and delivery of interventions into organizational settings that require adoption and implementation at the business level to benefit the working individuals. We present a TWH case study, Health Links™, to illustrate an approach to applying an existing implementation framework, RE-AIM, to plan, design, build, and then evaluate TWH implementation strategies. Our case study also highlights key concepts for scaling-out TWH evidence-based interventions where they are implemented in new workplace settings, new delivery systems, or both. Our example provides strong support of key implementation planning constructs including early and consistent stakeholder engagement, tailored messaging and marketing, flexibility, and adaptations in implementation strategies to maximize adoption, implementation, and maintenance among participating businesses.


Asunto(s)
Ciencia de la Implementación , Salud Laboral , Adaptación Fisiológica , Humanos , Proyectos de Investigación , Lugar de Trabajo
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34574628

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic created workplace challenges for employee safety and health, especially in small enterprises. We used linear mixed-effects regression to examine changes in health climate, safety climate, and worker well-being, prior to the pandemic and at two timepoints during it. We also examined whether employees at organizations that had received a TWH leadership development intervention prior to COVID-19 would better maintain pre-pandemic perceptions of climates and well-being. The final study cohort consisted of 261 employees from 31 organizations. No differences were observed in mean outcome scores between the leadership intervention groups at any of the survey timepoints. We combined intervention groups to examine the difference across timepoints. Perceptions of health and safety climates remained stable across all timepoints. However, employee well-being scores declined between the pre-pandemic period and subsequent COVID-19 timepoints. These findings suggest that while small organizations continued to be viewed as supporting employees' health and safety over the course of the pandemic, well-being scores declined, indicating that other factors contributed to decreased well-being. The findings from this study have implications for small business leaders as they navigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the health, safety, and well-being on their organizations and employees.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Pequeña Empresa , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Pandemias , Percepción , SARS-CoV-2 , Administración de la Seguridad , Lugar de Trabajo
10.
Am J Ind Med ; 64(12): 1045-1052, 2021 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34462934

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There is little longitudinal research on whether changes to Total Worker Health® (TWH) policies and programs are associated with changes in health climate and safety climate. We hypothesize that as TWH policies and programs change, employees will report changes in safety climate and health climate from baseline to 1 year. METHODS: Twenty-five diverse small businesses and their employees participated in assessments completed approximately 1 year apart. The exposures of interest, TWH policies and programs, were measured using the business-level Healthy Workplace Assessment™ which collects information on six benchmarks. The outcomes of interest, employee perceptions of safety climate and health climate, were measured via an employee survey. We employed paired t-tests and simple linear regression to assess change over a 1-year period. RESULTS: The mean Healthy Workplace Assessment overall score changed by 11.3 points (SD = 11.8) from baseline to Year 1. From baseline to Year 1, the mean scores of each benchmark changed in a positive direction within this sample. The mean safety climate score and health climate score changed by +0.1 points (SD = 0.2) and +0.1 points (SD = 6.4) from baseline to Year 1, respectively. The associations between changes in the overall Healthy Workplace Assessment score and health climate and safety climate scores were negligible [ß = 0.01 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.002, 0.02), and ß = 0.01 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.02), respectively]. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that when small businesses improve upon their TWH policies and programs they experience marginal measurable improvements in employee perceptions of their workplace safety climate and health climate.


Asunto(s)
Salud Laboral , Pequeña Empresa , Humanos , Proyectos Piloto , Políticas , Lugar de Trabajo
11.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1010, 2021 05 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34051787

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Total Worker Health® (TWH) approach is a best practice method to protect and promote worker safety, health, and well-being. Central to this approach is leadership support and health and safety climates that support day-to-day use of health and safety policies and programs. There is some research that supports these relationships, but there is limited research amongst small businesses. Furthermore, it remains to be shown what role TWH business strategies, as reflected by organizational policies and programs, play in this process. The purpose of this study is to characterize small businesses by their organizations' TWH approach and assess the relationship of these approaches to employee health and safety behaviors. METHODS: We utilized cross-sectional data from 97 businesses participating in the Small+Safe+Well study. We collected data using a business assessment tool, Healthy Workplace Assessment™, and an employee assessment tool, Employee Health and Safety Culture Survey. We used latent profile analysis at the business level to identify subgroups of businesses based on a set of characteristics from these assessments. Linear regression analysis at the employee level was used to determine profile association with employee safety and health behaviors. RESULTS: There were two profiles characterized by the lowest (33% of all businesses) and highest (9%) levels of the indicators. There were also two profiles with higher scores on two of the different foci on either TWH business strategies (27%) or leadership and climate (31%). Employees working for a business with a profile that focused on leadership and climate, in addition to having a business strategy, reported the best safety and health behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that employee engagement in TWH will be highest when businesses have a strategy for how they implement a TWH approach and when they demonstrate leadership commitment to these strategies and foster positive safety and health climates. Our results offer suggestions on how to use TWH assessments to develop interventions for small businesses. More research is needed to understand whether small businesses can improve upon their profile overtime, whether these changes depend on contextual factors, and whether TWH interventions can help them improve their profile.


Asunto(s)
Salud Laboral , Pequeña Empresa , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Administración de la Seguridad , Estados Unidos , Lugar de Trabajo
12.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(8): 657-664, 2021 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33950039

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Little is understood about the mechanisms for improving the adoption and implementation of Total Worker Health® (TWH) in workplace settings. The primary objective of this study was to identify whether the delivery of TWH advising is associated with subsequent changes in TWH in small-to-medium sized businesses. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal study of a TWH intervention in 200 organizations completing Health Links Healthy Workplace Assessments™ between October 2016 and December 2019. Organizations were offered consultation via telephonic and live web-based advising sessions. RESULTS: Organizations exhibited non-significant albeit positive change in assessment scores from baseline to assessment 2. Businesses receiving advising showed significant score improvements from assessment 2 to 3, versus those without advising. CONCLUSIONS: TWH consultation may enhance adoption of organizational behaviors that promote worker health, safety, and well-being over time.


Asunto(s)
Salud Laboral , Promoción de la Salud , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Pequeña Empresa , Lugar de Trabajo
13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33668716

RESUMEN

Total Worker Health® (TWH) is a framework for integrating worker and workplace safety, health, and well-being, which has achieved success in European and US settings. However, the framework has not been implemented in Latin America or in agricultural sectors, leaving large and vulnerable populations underrepresented in the implementation and evaluation of these strategies to improve safety and promote health and well-being. This study presents a case study of how a TWH approach can be applied to a multinational Latin American agribusiness. We describe the process and adaptation strategy for conducting a TWH assessment at multiple organizational levels and in multiple countries. We follow this with a description of a TWH leadership training that was conducted based on the results of the assessment. Finally, we describe our methods to make corporate recommendations for TWH policies and programs that were informed by the TWH assessment and leadership trainings. With this case study we aim to demonstrate the importance and feasibility of conducting TWH in Latin America.


Asunto(s)
Salud Laboral , Promoción de la Salud , América Latina , Liderazgo , Lugar de Trabajo
14.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245716, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33493190

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of a practical diabetes risk score amongst two heterogenous populations, a working population and a non-working population. Study population 1 (n = 2,089) participated in a large-scale screening program offered to retired workers to discover previously undetected/incipient chronic illness. Study population 2 (n = 3,293) was part of a Colorado worksite wellness program health risk assessment. We assessed the relationship between a continuous diabetes risk score at baseline and development of diabetes in the future using logistic regression. Receiver operating curves and sensitivity/specificity of the models were calculated. Across both study populations, we observed that participants with diabetes at follow-up had higher diabetes risk scores at baseline than participants who did not have diabetes at follow-up. On average, the odds ratio of developing diabetes in the future was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.26-1.50, p < 0.0001) for study population 1 and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.45-1.95, p-value < 0.0001) for study population 2. These findings indicate that the diabetes risk score may be generalizable to diverse individuals, and thus potentially a population level diabetes screening tool. Minimally-invasive diabetes risk scores can aid in the identification of sub-populations of individuals at risk for diabetes.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiología , Modelos Biológicos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Colorado/epidemiología , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Medición de Riesgo , Factores de Riesgo
15.
Occup Health Sci ; 5: 163-188, 2021 Mar 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37366387

RESUMEN

Leaders play a critical role in the development and execution of Total Worker Health (TWH). Small businesses, in particular, can benefit from strong leadership support for TWH as the burden of work-related injury, illness and fatality, as well as poor health and well-being is high in this population. In the present study, we conducted a program evaluation of a TWH leadership development program for small business leaders using the RE-AIM framework. The goal of the program was to help change leaders' behaviors around health, safety and well-being practices following the theory of transformational leadership. Two leaders from each business participated in pre-training activities on their own, a 6-hour in-person training, and three months of access to virtual training transfer activities, including coaching and goal tracking. Our results suggest that the TWH leadership development program is effective at improving leaders' self-reported TWH leadership practices and that the in-person training was implemented successfully. However, leaders did not report improvements in their personal health and in fact reported increased levels of work stress after the program. We also observed some challenges when implementing our training transfer strategies. Our study suggests that leaders may benefit from attending TWH leadership trainings alongside other colleagues in their organization to facilitate a shared vision and goals for TWH in their organization. As a next step, it will be important to determine the program's effectiveness in changing business TWH policies and practices, employee perceptions of TWH and leadership, and employee health and safety outcomes.

16.
J Safety Res ; 74: 199-205, 2020 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32951784

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The majority of construction companies are small businesses and small business often lack the resources needed to ensure that their supervisors have the safety leadership skills to build and maintain a strong jobsite safety climate. The Foundations for Safety Leadership (FSL) training program was designed to provide frontline leaders in all sized companies with safety leadership skills. This paper examines the impact of the FSL training by size of business. METHODS: Leaders, defined as foremen or other frontline supervisors, from small, medium, and large construction companies were recruited to participate in a study to evaluate the degree to which the FSL changed their understanding and use of the leadership skills, safety practices and crew reporting of safety-related conditions. We used linear mixed modeling methods to analyze pre-post training survey data. RESULTS: Prior to the training, leaders from small and medium sized companies reported using safety leadership skills less frequently than those from large ones. After the training, regardless of business size, we observed that the FSL training improved leaders understanding of safety leadership skills from immediately before to immediately after the training. Additionally, leaders reported greater use of safety leadership skills, safety practices, and crew reporting of safety-related conditions from before to two-weeks after the training. However, those from small and medium sized companies reported the greatest improvement in their use of safety leadership skills. CONCLUSIONS: The FSL training improves safety leadership outcomes regardless of the size company for which the leader worked. However, the FSL may be even more effective at improving the safety leadership skills of leaders working for smaller sized construction companies or those with lower baseline levels of safety leadership skills. Practical applications: The majority of construction companies employ a small number of employees and therefore may not have the resources to provide their frontline leaders with the leadership training they need to be effective leaders who can create a strong jobsite safety climate. The Foundations for Safety Leadership (FSL) training can help fill this gap.


Asunto(s)
Liderazgo , Administración de la Seguridad/métodos , Pequeña Empresa/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos
17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32213806

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between Total Worker Health® (TWH) business strategies and employee perceptions of leadership commitment and safety and health climates. Using data from 53 small enterprises and 1271 of their workers collected as part of the Small + Safe + Well (SSWell) Study, we confirm the primacy of the relationship between leadership commitment to safety and workplace safety climate. After accounting for leadership commitment to safety, business-reported policies and practices that promote the health, safety, and well-being of workers (i.e., TWH strategies) were no longer related to safety climate. In contrast, the relationship between TWH strategies and health climate were significantly associated with the level of small business leadership commitment to worksite wellness. Relatedly, our results demonstrate that leadership is a common correlate to both safety climate and health climate. Future research should investigate integrated TWH leadership development strategies as a means of simultaneously improving safety and health climates.


Asunto(s)
Liderazgo , Salud Laboral , Pequeña Empresa , Envío de Mensajes de Texto , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Cultura Organizacional , Lugar de Trabajo
18.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(5): 350-358, 2020 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32080015

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the motivational processes between employee occupational safety and health climates and behaviors using the Theory of Self-Determination in a sample of diverse small businesses. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data to assess whether employee safety/health intrinsic, identified, and external motives mediate the relationship between safety/health climate and behavior. RESULTS: All three types of motivation mediated the relationship between safety and health climates and behaviors. CONCLUSION: Small businesses seeking to engage employees in Total Worker Health efforts should build strong safety and health climates because of their influence on employees' motivation to participate in health promoting and health protective programs.


Asunto(s)
Salud Laboral , Cultura Organizacional , Pequeña Empresa/organización & administración , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Modelos Psicológicos , Motivación , Administración de la Seguridad/organización & administración , Lugar de Trabajo/organización & administración , Lugar de Trabajo/psicología
19.
J Safety Res ; 70: 253-262, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31848003

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The 2.5 h Foundations for Safety Leadership (FSL) training program teaches construction supervisors the leadership skills they need to strengthen jobsite safety climate and reduce adverse safety-related outcomes. METHODS: Using a quasi-experimental prospective switching replications study design, we examined (1) if FSL-trained jobsite safety leaders would report improved understanding and practice of the FSL leadership skills, safety practices and crew reporting of safety related conditions, and (2) if their crew perceived a change in (a) their supervisors' practices, (b) their own safety practices and reporting of safety-related conditions, and (c) overall jobsite safety climate. Twenty construction sub-contracting companies were recruited and randomly assigned to either an early or lagged-control training group. Participating supervisors and workers completed surveys at multiple time points before and after the FSL training. We used linear mixed modeling to test changes over time. RESULTS: Only supervisors in the early group reported a statistically significant improvement in their understanding and practice of the leadership skills as well as safety practices from before to 2- and 4-weeks post-training. Overall, no significant change was detected in crew-reported outcomes from before to after their supervisors' participated in the FSL training. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide evidence that the FSL training can, at least in the short-term, improve construction frontline leaders' jobsite leadership skills. Future research could include an evaluation of FSL refresher activities and a longer-term follow-up. Practical applications: The Foundations for Safety Leadership (FSL) program fills an identified need for construction frontline supervisors to learn and practice critical safety leadership skills on the jobsite. It has already reached over 60,000 leaders and has the potential to reach over 100,000 each year during either an OSHA 30-h or a stand-alone course.


Asunto(s)
Accidentes de Trabajo/prevención & control , Industria de la Construcción , Liderazgo , Aprendizaje , Salud Laboral/educación , Cultura Organizacional , Lugar de Trabajo , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Prospectivos , Seguridad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Heridas y Lesiones/prevención & control
20.
J Occup Environ Med ; 61(7): 597-604, 2019 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31022100

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper is to describe and evaluate a web-based, educational Health Risk Calculator that communicates the value of investing in employee health and well-being for the prevention of work-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. METHODS: We developed and evaluated the calculator following the RE-AIM framework. We assessed effectiveness via focus groups (n = 15) and a post-use survey (n = 33) and reach via website analytics. RESULTS: We observed evidence for the calculator's usability, educational benefit, and encouragement of action to improve worker health and safety. Website analytics data demonstrated that we reached over 300 users equally in urban and rural areas within 3 months after launch. CONCLUSION: We urge researchers to consider the ways in which they can communicate their empirical research findings to their key stakeholders and to evaluate their communication efforts.


Asunto(s)
Promoción de la Salud/economía , Enfermedades Profesionales/economía , Servicios de Salud del Trabajador/economía , Salud Laboral/economía , Traumatismos Ocupacionales/economía , Indemnización para Trabajadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Colorado/epidemiología , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Incidencia , Internet , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Enfermedades Profesionales/epidemiología , Enfermedades Profesionales/etiología , Enfermedades Profesionales/prevención & control , Salud Laboral/estadística & datos numéricos , Traumatismos Ocupacionales/epidemiología , Traumatismos Ocupacionales/etiología , Traumatismos Ocupacionales/prevención & control , Medición de Riesgo , Indemnización para Trabajadores/economía , Adulto Joven
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