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1.
Ethn Health ; : 1-16, 2020 Sep 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894680

RESUMEN

Objective: To examine the prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with protein intake in men and women in a multi-ethnic population. Design: We used cross-sectional data from the HELIUS (Healthy Life in an Urban Setting) study, which includes nearly 25,000 participants (aged 18-70 years) of Dutch, South-Asian Surinamese, African Surinamese, Turkish, Moroccan, and Ghanaian ethnic origin. For the current study, we included 5161 individuals aged 55 years and older. Sarcopenia was defined according to the EWGSOP2. In a subsample (N = 1371), protein intake was measured using ethnic-specific Food Frequency Questionnaires. Descriptive analyses were performed to study sarcopenia prevalence across ethnic groups in men and women, and logistic regression analyses were used to study associations between protein intake and sarcopenia. Results: Sarcopenia prevalence was found to be sex- and ethnic-specific, varying from 29.8% in Turkish to 61.3% in South-Asian Surinamese men and ranging from 2.4% in Turkish up to 30.5% in South-Asian Surinamese women. Higher protein intake was associated with a 4% lower odds of sarcopenia in the subsample (OR = 0.96, 95%-CI: 0.92-0.99) and across ethnic groups, being only significant in the South-Asian Surinamese group. Conclusion: Ethnic differences in the prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with protein intake suggest the need to target specific ethnic groups for prevention or treatment of sarcopenia.

2.
BMJ Open ; 10(9): e039091, 2020 Sep 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32883740

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Major ECG abnormalities have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden in asymptomatic populations. However, sex differences in occurrence of major ECG abnormalities have been poorly studied, particularly across ethnic groups. The objectives were to investigate (1) sex differences in the prevalence of major and, as a secondary outcome, minor ECG abnormalities, (2) whether patterns of sex differences varied across ethnic groups, by age and (3) to what extent conventional cardiovascular risk factors contributed to observed sex differences. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of population-based study. SETTING: Multi-ethnic, population-based Healthy Life in an Urban Setting cohort, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 8089 men and 11 369 women of Dutch, South-Asian Surinamese, African Surinamese, Ghanaian, Turkish and Moroccan origin aged 18-70 years without CVD. OUTCOME MEASURES: Age-adjusted and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to study sex differences in prevalence of major and, as secondary outcome, minor ECG abnormalities in the overall population, across ethnic groups and by age-groups (18-35, 36-50 and >50 years). RESULTS: Major and minor ECG abnormalities were less prevalent in women than men (4.6% vs 6.6% and 23.8% vs 39.8%, respectively). After adjustment for conventional risk factors, sex differences in major abnormalities were smaller in ethnic minority groups (OR ranged from 0.61 in Moroccans to 1.32 in South-Asian Surinamese) than in the Dutch (OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.65). Only in South-Asian Surinamese, women did not have a lower odds than men (OR 1.32; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.84). The pattern of smaller sex differences in ethnic minority groups was more pronounced in older than in younger age-groups. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of major ECG abnormalities was lower in women than men. However, sex differences were less apparent in ethnic minority groups. Conventional risk factors did not contribute substantially to observed sex differences.

3.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(13): e015477, 2020 Jul 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32573319

RESUMEN

Background Early prehospital recognition of critical conditions such as ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has prognostic relevance. Current international electrocardiographic STEMI thresholds are predominantly based on individuals of Western European descent. However, because of ethnic electrocardiographic variability both in health and disease, there is a need to reevaluate diagnostic ST-segment elevation thresholds for different populations. We hypothesized that fulfillment of ST-segment elevation thresholds of STEMI criteria (STE-ECGs) in apparently healthy individuals is ethnicity dependent. Methods and Results HELIUS (Healthy Life in an Urban Setting) is a multiethnic cohort study including 10 783 apparently healthy subjects of 6 different ethnicities (African Surinamese, Dutch, Ghanaian, Moroccan, South Asian Surinamese, and Turkish). Prevalence of STE-ECGs across ethnicities, sexes, and age groups was assessed with respect to the 2 international STEMI thresholds: sex and age specific versus sex specific. Mean prevalence of STE-ECGs was 2.8% to 3.4% (age/sex-specific and sex-specific thresholds, respectively), although with large ethnicity-dependent variability. Prevalences in Western European Dutch were 2.3% to 3.0%, but excessively higher in young (<40 years) Ghanaian males (21.7%-27.5%) and lowest in older (≥40 years) Turkish females (0.0%). Ethnicity (sub-Saharan African origin) and other variables (eg, younger age, male sex, high QRS voltages, or anterolateral early repolarization pattern) were positively associated with STE-ECG occurrence, resulting in subgroups with >45% STE-ECGs. Conclusions The accuracy of diagnostic tests partly relies on background prevalence in healthy individuals. In apparently healthy subjects, there is a highly variable ethnicity-dependent prevalence of ECGs with ST-segment elevations exceeding STEMI thresholds. This has potential consequences for STEMI evaluations in individuals who are not of Western European descent, putatively resulting in adverse outcomes with both over- and underdiagnosis of STEMI.

4.
J Dual Diagn ; 16(3): 271-284, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32552497

RESUMEN

Objective: Ethnic minorities report different levels of drinking and smoking and higher rates of depression compared to native populations. In this study we aimed to investigate in six ethnic groups whether tobacco and alcohol use were associated with depressive symptoms, which are more prevalent in ethnic minorities.Methods: Cross-sectional data from the multi-ethnic Healthy Life in an Urban Setting (HELIUS) study sample (N = 22,471) was used, comprising 4,580 native Dutch participants which were compared with participants from five ethnic minority groups (3,259 South Asian Surinamese, 4,292 African Surinamese, 2,262 Ghanaian, 3,891 Turkish, and 4,187 Moroccan).Results: Alcohol misuse was positively associated with depressed mood in all ethnic groups except for the Dutch and the Ghanaians. Nicotine dependence was positively associated with depressed mood in all ethnic groups except for the Ghanaian group.Conclusions: Alcohol misuse and nicotine dependence were significantly associated with depressed mood in most but not all ethnic groups and especially in men. However, across all groups the contribution of alcohol misuse and nicotine dependence to depressed mood was small. Prospective multi-ethnic studies should confirm whether the relations are causal and elucidate their direction.

5.
Prev Med ; 137: 106141, 2020 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32454057

RESUMEN

Little is known about how health-related behaviours cluster across different populations and how lifestyle clusters are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. We investigated lifestyle clusters and their association with T2D in a multi-ethnic population. 4396 Dutch, 2850 South-Asian Surinamese, 3814 African Surinamese, 2034 Ghanaian, 3328 Turkish, and 3661 Moroccan origin participants of the HELIUS study were included (2011-2015). K-medoids cluster analyses were used to identify lifestyle clusters. Logistic and cox regression analyses were performed to investigate the association of clusters with prevalent and incident T2D, respectively. Pooled analysis revealed three clusters: a 'healthy', 'somewhat healthy', and 'unhealthy' cluster. Most ethnic groups were unequally distributed: Dutch participants were mostly present in the 'healthy' cluster, Turkish and Moroccan participants in the 'somewhat healthy' cluster, while the Surinamese and Ghanaian participants were equally distributed across clusters. When stratified for ethnicity, analysis revealed three clusters per ethnic group. While the 'healthy' and 'somewhat healthy' clusters were similar to those of the pooled analysis, we observed considerable differences in the ethnic-specific 'unhealthy' clusters. Fruit consumption (3-4 days/week) was the only behaviour that was consistent across all ethnic-specific 'unhealthy' clusters. The pooled 'unhealthy' cluster was positively associated with prediabetes (OR: 1.34, 95%CI 1.21-1.48) and incident T2D (OR: 1.23, 95%CI 0.89-1.69), and negatively associated with prevalent T2D (OR: 0.80, 95%CI 0.69-0.93). Results were similar for most, but not all, ethnic-specific clusters. This illustrates that targeting multiple behaviours is relevant in prevention of T2D but that ethnic differences in lifestyle clusters should be taken into account.

6.
Helicobacter ; 25(3): e12687, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32147867

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori prevalence varies greatly worldwide. We explored the prevalence of H. pylori and CagA seropositivity among adults aged 18-44 years living in the Netherlands by ethnicity and migration status (first vs second generation). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants from six different ethnic groups were selected from the population-based multi-ethnic HELIUS study in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Serum samples were tested for H. pylori antigens using a validated Luminex-based multiplex serology assay. Prevalence ratios were estimated using Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 4683 participants aged 18-44 years were randomly selected based on sex, ethnicity, and age. H. pylori seroprevalence was highest in the Ghanaian group (84%), followed by Moroccan (81%), Turkish (66%), African Surinamese (51%), South-Asian Surinamese (48%), and Dutch (17%) participants. All ethnic minority groups had a significantly higher risk of being H. pylori seropositive compared to the Dutch group. This association was strongest among participants born outside the Netherlands (first generation), but was still significant and apparent among second-generation participants. Among first-generation participants, all groups, except the Moroccans, had a significantly higher proportion of individuals with a cagA + H. pylori strain compared to the Dutch participants. CONCLUSION: Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence among first-generation migrants is high in the Netherlands and remains elevated among second-generation migrants (ie, those born in the Netherlands). High exposure to H. pylori, and especially to the more virulent cagA+ strain, highlights the need for tailored prevention of gastric diseases (notably peptic ulcers and cancers) among migrants.

7.
Eur J Public Health ; 30(2): 322-327, 2020 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32053154

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The burden of cardiovascular risk is distributed unequally between ethnic groups. It is uncertain to what extent this is attributable to ethnic differences in general and abdominal obesity. Therefore, we studied the contribution of general and abdominal obesity to metabolic cardiovascular risk among different ethnic groups. METHODS: We used data of 21 411 participants of Dutch, South-Asian Surinamese, African-Surinamese, Ghanaian, Turkish or Moroccan origin in Healthy Life in an Urban Setting (Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Obesity was defined using body-mass-index (general) or waist-to-height-ratio (abdominal). High metabolic risk was defined as having at least two of the following: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/l, fasting glucose ≥5.6 mmol/l, blood pressure ≥130 mmHg systolic and/or ≥85 mmHg diastolic and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <1.03 mmol/l (men) or <1.29 mmol/l (women). RESULTS: Among ethnic minority men, age-adjusted prevalence rates of high metabolic risk ranged from 32 to 59% vs. 33% among Dutch men. Contributions of general obesity to high metabolic risk ranged from 7.1 to 17.8%, vs. 10.1% among Dutch men, whereas contributions of abdominal obesity ranged from 52.1 to 92.3%, vs. 53.9% among Dutch men. Among ethnic minority women, age-adjusted prevalence rates of high metabolic risk ranged from 24 to 35% vs. 12% among Dutch women. Contributions of general obesity ranged from 14.6 to 41.8%, vs. 20% among Dutch women, whereas contributions of abdominal obesity ranged from 68.0 to 92.8%, vs. 72.1% among Dutch women. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity, especially abdominal obesity, contributes significantly to the prevalence of high metabolic cardiovascular risk. Results suggest that this contribution varies substantially between ethnic groups, which helps explain ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk.

8.
Child Abuse Negl ; 99: 104239, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31731139

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Maltreatment in childhood increases the risk of depression later in life. The influence of ethnicity and sex on this relationship is less well understood. OBJECTIVE: This paper examines ethnic and sex differences in rates of child maltreatment (CM) and depressed mood in adulthood and investigates whether the association between CM and depressed mood in adulthood is influenced by ethnicity and sex. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Baseline data from the multiethnic HELIUS study (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) was analyzed and consisted of 22,551 participants aged 18-70 years from Dutch, African Surinamese, South Asian-Surinamese, Turkish, Moroccan, or Ghanaian ethnic backgrounds. METHODS: Physical, sexual and psychological abuse, and emotional neglect in childhood were self-reported and depressed mood was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that emotional neglect and psychological abuse both have significant positive relationships with depressed mood. Furthermore, these associations were consistent across ethnic groups. The addition of ethnicity-by-maltreatment interaction terms to a main effects model revealed that Ghanaians who reported physical abuse in childhood were the only ethnic group with significantly increased odds for depressed mood (OR = 2.62, p =  .001), with the same being true for Moroccans who experienced sexual abuse in childhood (OR = 1.91, p =  .008). No sex differences were found in the relationships between CM and depressed mood. CONCLUSIONS: The association between different types of CM and depressive symptoms may not always be uniform across ethnic groups. Greater understanding of the nuances present in these relationships is required to develop effective prevention and intervention strategies for multiethnic populations.

9.
Eur Addict Res ; 26(2): 66-76, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31812961

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Dutch multi-ethnic Healthy Life in an Urban Setting study recently showed that alcohol consumption was lower in ethnic minority groups than those of Dutch origin, but that binge drinking in drinkers of Turkish and Moroccan origin was relatively high. The aim of the current study is to examine factors that may contribute to the differences in drinking patterns and how they relate to the relationship between drinking patterns and alcohol dependence (AD) across ethnic groups. METHODS: The rate of last year alcohol use, alcohol use patterns and AD was assessed in 4,635 Dutch, 4,317 Moroccan, 4,036 Turkish, 2,459 Ghanaian, 4,426 African Surinamese and 3,357 South-Asian Surinamese participants (both men and women) born in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. RESULTS: Compared to the Dutch, the prevalence of (regular) drinking is substantially lower in all ethnic minority groups and regular drinkers among most ethnic minority groups have a lower adjusted risk to develop binge drinking and AD than the Dutch. For the prevalence of regular drinking, the ethnic differences are bigger than for the prevalence of current drinking. However, regular drinkers of Moroccan origin have a risk similar to the Dutch to develop binge drinking and AD; a finding that could not be explained by group differences in age, sex, religiosity, perceived discrimination, depression or guilt feelings about drinking. DISCUSSION: The prevalence data show that current drinking is lower and that regular drinking is much lower in ethnic minorities and - with the exception of those of Moroccan origin - ethnic minority regular drinkers also have a significant lower risk to develop binge drinking or AD than regular drinkers of Dutch origin. This implies that the magnitude of problematic alcohol use is substantially smaller in ethnic minorities than in the ethnic Dutch population of Amsterdam. Unfortunately, no explanation was found for the special risk situation of regular drinkers of Moroccan origin.

10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31827781

RESUMEN

Background: The increase of antimicrobial resistance, mainly due to increased antibiotic use, is worrying. Preliminary evidence suggests that antibiotic use differs across ethnic groups in the Netherlands, with higher use in people of non-Dutch origin. We aimed to determine whether appropriate knowledge and use of antibiotics differ by ethnicity and whether knowledge on antibiotics is associated with antibiotic use. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study analyzing baseline data (2011-2015) from a population-based cohort (HELIUS study), which were linked to data from a health insurance register. We included 21,617 HELIUS participants of South-Asian Surinamese, African-Surinamese, Turkish, Moroccan, Ghanaian, and Dutch origin. Fifteen thousand seven participants had available prescription data from the Achmea Health Data-base (AHD) in the year prior to their HELIUS study visit. Participants were asked five questions on antibiotic treatment during influenza-like illness, pneumonia, fever, sore throat and bronchitis, from which higher versus lower antibiotic knowledge level was determined. Number of antibiotic prescriptions in the year prior to the HELIUS study visit was used to determine antibiotic use. Results: The percentage of individuals with a higher level of antibiotic knowledge was lower among all ethnic minority groups (range 57 to 70%) compared to Dutch (80%). After correcting for baseline characteristics, including medical conditions, first-generation African Surinamese and Turkish migrants received a significantly lower number of antibiotic prescriptions compared to individuals of Dutch origin. Only second-generation Ghanaian participants received more prescriptions compared to Dutch participants (aIRR 2.09, 95%CI 1.06 to 4.12). Higher level of antibiotic knowledge was not significantly associated with the number of prescriptions (IRR 0.92, 95%CI 0.85 to 1.00). Conclusions: Levels of antibiotic knowledge varied between ethnic groups, but a lower level of antibiotic knowledge did not correspond with a higher number of antibiotic prescriptions.

11.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 19871, 2019 12 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31882814

RESUMEN

Our aim was to identify whether low-grade inflammation, reflected by C-reactive protein (CRP), explains the higher risk for incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) among ethnic minorities. We included 837 Dutch, 712 South-Asian Surinamese, 797 African Surinamese, 804 Ghanaian, 817 Turkish and 778 Moroccan origin participants of the HELIUS study (Amsterdam, the Netherlands). We used multiple linear regression to assess ethnic differences in CRP levels. We determined the association of CRP with T2D and the modifying effect of ethnicity by cox regression, and compared hazard ratios for the association between ethnicity and T2D before and after adjustment for CRP. CRP levels were higher in ethnic minority groups than in Dutch origin participants. CRP was associated with a higher T2D incidence, similarly across ethnic groups (overall HR per SD 1.38 [95% CI 1.14; 1.68]). However, the association was attenuated and no longer statistically significant after adjustment for adiposity measures (HR 1.11 [95% CI 0.90; 1.37]). CRP accounted for a very small part of the ethnic differences in T2D, but only in models unadjusted for adiposity. Low-grade inflammation does not substantially contribute to the higher risk of T2D among ethnic minority populations compared to the Dutch.

12.
Spat Spatiotemporal Epidemiol ; 31: 100300, 2019 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31677765

RESUMEN

To create neighbourhood environments that encourage physical activity, it is important to know which neighbourhood characteristics are most influential. We examined the association of neighbourhood safety with leisure-time walking and cycling in the population at large, as well as in some subgroups in terms of sex, age, ethnicity and socio-economic position. We used data of 19,914 participants (18-70 years) from a study in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Leisure-time walking and cycling in minutes/week were assessed with standard questionnaire. Geographic Information System techniques were used to examine neighbourhood safety (range = 1-10). Multilevel linear regression analyses showed positive associations between safety and walking (B = 7.9, 95% CI = -6.2-21.9) and cycling (B = 14.8, 95% CI = 2.5-27.1), but only the association with cycling was statistically significant. Higher safety levels were significantly associated with more cycling in women and individuals of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Stronger evidence is needed to inform policies to stimulate walking and cycling by improving neighbourhood safety.


Asunto(s)
Ciclismo , Actividades Recreativas , Características de la Residencia , Seguridad , Caminata , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
13.
Eur J Prev Cardiol ; : 2047487319866284, 2019 Jul 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31345055

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Ethnic differences in the age-of-onset of cardiovascular risk factors may necessitate ethnic-specific age thresholds to initiate cardiovascular risk screening. Recent European recommendations to modify cardiovascular risk estimates among certain ethnic groups may further increase this necessity. AIMS: To determine ethnic differences in the age to initiate cardiovascular risk screening, with and without implementation of ethnic-specific modification of estimated cardiovascular risk. METHODS: We included 18,031 participants of Dutch, South-Asian Surinamese, African Surinamese, Ghanaian, Turkish and Moroccan background from the HELIUS study (Amsterdam). Eligibility for cardiovascular risk screening was defined as being eligible for blood pressure-lowering treatment, based on a combination of systolic blood pressure, estimated cardiovascular risk, and ethnic-specific conversion of estimated cardiovascular risk as recommended by European cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines. Age-specific proportions of eligibility were determined and compared between ethnic groups via logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Dutch men reached the specified threshold to initiate cardiovascular risk screening (according to Dutch guidelines) at an average age of 51.5 years. Among ethnic minority men, this age ranged from 39.8 to 52.4. Among Dutch women, the average age threshold was 53.4. Among ethnic minority women, this age ranged from 36.8 to 49.1. Age-adjusted odds of eligibility were significantly higher than in the Dutch among all subgroups, except among Moroccan men. Applying ethnic-specific conversion factors had minimal effect on the age to initiate screening in all subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Most ethnic minority groups become eligible for blood pressure-lowering treatment at a lower age and may therefore benefit from lower age-thresholds to initiate cardiovascular risk screening.

14.
Eur J Prev Cardiol ; 26(17): 1888-1896, 2019 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31154827

RESUMEN

AIMS: European guidelines recommend estimating cardiovascular disease risk using the Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) algorithm. Two versions of SCORE are available: one based on the total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and one based on total cholesterol alone. Cardiovascular risk classification between the two algorithms may differ, particularly among ethnic minority groups with a lipid profile different from the ethnic majority groups among whom the SCORE algorithms were validated. Thus in this study we determined whether discrepancies in cardiovascular risk classification between the two SCORE algorithms are more common in ethnic minority groups relative to the Dutch. METHODS: Using HELIUS study data (Amsterdam, The Netherlands), we obtained data from 7572 participants without self-reported prior cardiovascular disease of Dutch, South-Asian Surinamese, African Surinamese, Ghanaian, Turkish and Moroccan ethnic origin. For both SCORE algorithms, cardiovascular risk was estimated and used to categorise participants as low (<1%), medium (1-5%), high (5-10%) or very high (≥10%) risk. Odds of differential cardiovascular risk classification were determined by logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The percentage of participants classified differently between the algorithms ranged from 8.7% to 12.4% among ethnic minority men versus 11.4% among Dutch men, and from 1.9% to 5.5% among ethnic minority women versus 6.2% among Dutch women. Relative to the Dutch, only Turkish and Moroccan women showed significantly different (lower) odds of differential cardiovascular risk classification. CONCLUSION: We found no indication that discrepancies in cardiovascular risk classification between the two SCORE algorithms are consistently more common in ethnic minority groups than among ethnic majority groups.

15.
Eur J Public Health ; 29(4): 694-699, 2019 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31056659

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In Europe, a substantial percentage of the 22 million inhabitants with histories of migration from non-European countries utilize healthcare in their countries of origin. That could reflect avoidance of healthcare in the country of residence, but this has not been studied previously. METHODS: We linked Dutch healthcare reimbursement data to the multi-ethnic population-based data from the HELIUS study conducted in Amsterdam. In multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses, we examined associations between healthcare use in country of origin and in country of residence by people with Turkish and with Moroccan backgrounds (N = 2920 and N = 3031, respectively) in the period 2010-15. RESULTS: Participants with Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds who utilized healthcare one or multiple times in the country of origin (n = 1335 and n = 558, respectively) were found to be more likely, in comparison with non-users (n = 1585, n = 2473), to be frequent attenders of services by general practitioners, medical specialists and/or allied health professionals in the Netherlands [odds ratios between 1.21 (95% CI 0.91-1.60) and 3.15 (95% CI 2.38-4.16)]. GEE analyses showed similar results. CONCLUSION: People with Turkish or Moroccan backgrounds living in the Netherlands who use healthcare in their countries of origin are more likely than non-users to be higher users of healthcare in the Netherlands. We thus found no indications for avoidance of healthcare in the country of residence.

16.
Br J Psychiatry ; 215(2): 468-475, 2019 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31057126

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Studies on neighbourhood characteristics and depression show equivocal results.AimsThis large-scale pooled analysis examines whether urbanisation, socioeconomic, physical and social neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the prevalence and severity of depression. METHOD: Cross-sectional design including data are from eight Dutch cohort studies (n = 32 487). Prevalence of depression, either DSM-IV diagnosis of depressive disorder or scoring for moderately severe depression on symptom scales, and continuous depression severity scores were analysed. Neighbourhood characteristics were linked using postal codes and included (a) urbanisation grade, (b) socioeconomic characteristics: socioeconomic status, home value, social security beneficiaries and non-Dutch ancestry, (c) physical characteristics: air pollution, traffic noise and availability of green space and water, and (d) social characteristics: social cohesion and safety. Multilevel regression analyses were adjusted for the individual's age, gender, educational level and income. Cohort-specific estimates were pooled using random-effects analysis. RESULTS: The pooled analysis showed that higher urbanisation grade (odds ratio (OR) = 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10), lower socioeconomic status (OR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.87-0.95), higher number of social security beneficiaries (OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.19), higher percentage of non-Dutch residents (OR = 1.08, 95% CI 1.02-1.14), higher levels of air pollution (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.12), less green space (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.88-0.99) and less social safety (OR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.88-0.97) were associated with higher prevalence of depression. All four socioeconomic neighbourhood characteristics and social safety were also consistently associated with continuous depression severity scores. CONCLUSIONS: This large-scale pooled analysis across eight Dutch cohort studies shows that urbanisation and various socioeconomic, physical and social neighbourhood characteristics are associated with depression, indicating that a wide range of environmental aspects may relate to poor mental health.Declaration of interestNone.

17.
Nutr J ; 18(1): 21, 2019 03 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30922320

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Healthier dietary patterns are generally more costly than less healthy patterns, but dietary costs may be more important for dietary quality in lower educated and ethnic minority groups. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary costs and dietary quality and interactions with ethnicity and socioeconomic position (SEP). METHODS: We used cross-sectional data from 4717 Dutch, Surinamese, Turkish and Moroccan origin participants of the multi-ethnic HELIUS study (the Netherlands), who completed an ethnic-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The primary outcome measure was dietary quality according to adherence to the Dutch Healthy Diet index 2015 (DHD15-index, range 0-130). Individual dietary costs (the monetary value attached to consumed diets in Euros) were estimated by merging a food price variable with the FFQ nutrient composition database. Regression analyses were used to examine main and interaction effects. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, energy intake, physical activity, ethnicity and educational level. RESULTS: Having higher dietary costs was associated with higher dietary quality. Analyses stratified by educational level showed that associations were stronger in higher educated (Btertile3 = 8.06, 95%CI = 5.63; 10.48) than in lower educated participants (Btertile3 = 5.09, 95%CI = 2.74; 7.44). Stratification by ethnic origin showed strongest associations in Turkish participants (Btertile2 = 9.31, 95%CI = 5.96; 12.65) and weakest associations in Moroccan participants (Btertile3 = 4.29, 95%CI = 0.58; 8.01). Regardless of their level of education, Turkish and Moroccan individuals consumed higher quality diets at the lowest cost than Dutch participants. CONCLUSIONS: The importance of dietary costs for dietary quality differs between socioeconomic and ethnic subgroups. Increasing individual food budgets or decreasing food prices may be effective for the promotion of healthy diets, but differential effects across socioeconomic and ethnic subgroups may be expected.


Asunto(s)
Costos y Análisis de Costo , Dieta Saludable/estadística & datos numéricos , Dieta/economía , Grupos Étnicos , Factores Socioeconómicos , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Registros de Dieta , Femenino , Alimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Grupos Minoritarios , Marruecos/etnología , Países Bajos , Suriname/etnología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Turquia/etnología
18.
Eur J Public Health ; 29(4): 687-693, 2019 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30768174

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The burden of multimorbidity is likely higher in ethnic minority populations, as most individual diseases are more prevalent in minority groups. However, information is scarce. We examined ethnic inequalities in multimorbidity, and investigated to what extent they reflect differences in socioeconomic status (SES). METHODS: We included Healthy Life in an Urban Setting study participants of Dutch (N = 4582), South-Asian Surinamese (N = 3258), African Surinamese (N = 4267), Ghanaian (N = 2282), Turkish (N = 3879) and Moroccan (N = 4094) origin (aged 18-70 years). Educational level, employment status, income situation and multimorbidity were defined based on questionnaires. We described the prevalence and examined age-adjusted ethnic inequalities in multimorbidity with logistic regression analyses. To assess the contribution of SES, we added SES indicators to the age-adjusted model. RESULTS: The prevalence of multimorbidity ranged from 27.1 to 53.4% in men and from 38.5 to 69.6% in women. The prevalence of multimorbidity in most ethnic minority groups was comparable to the prevalence among Dutch participants who were 1-3 decades older. After adjustment for SES, the odds of multimorbidity remained significantly higher in ethnic minority groups. For instance, age-adjusted OR for multimorbidity for the Turkish compared to the Dutch changed from 4.43 (3.84-5.13) to 2.34 (1.99-2.75) in men and from 5.35 (4.69-6.10) to 2.94 (2.54-3.41) in women after simultaneous adjustment for all SES indicators. CONCLUSIONS: We found a significantly higher prevalence of multimorbidity in ethnic minority men and women compared to Dutch, and results pointed to an earlier onset of multimorbidity in ethnic minority groups. These inequalities in multimorbidity were not fully accounted for by differences in SES.

19.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 194: 197-204, 2019 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30447512

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of smoking varies across ethnic groups in developed countries, but little is known about ethnic variations in specific aspects of nicotine dependence (ND). We conducted item-response analyses in current smokers to compare ND factors across five ethnic groups. METHODS: Data were obtained from a population-based, multi-ethnic cohort study conducted in the Netherlands. The Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) was assessed in 1147 Dutch, 991 South-Asian Surinamese, 1408 African Surinamese, 1396 Turkish, and 584 Moroccan smokers (N = 5526). We tested whether the factorial structure of the FTND was invariant across ethnic groups using a multi-group confirmatory factor analysis. FTND item and total scores and factor means were compared across groups. RESULTS: The two-factor model representing "morning smoking" and "smoking patterns" provided an adequate fit. The items "Cigarettes smoked daily" and "Time until first cigarette" showed differential item functioning (DIF) as a function of ethnicity. Three out of four ethnic minority groups scored significantly higher on both factors compared to the Dutch origin group (all p < 0.001) before and after taking DIF into account, while the African Surinamese scored higher only on "morning smoking" when DIF was accounted for. DISCUSSION: The factor structure of the FTND is not measurement invariant across ethnic groups in this population-based sample. Accounting for DIF affecting the nicotine dependence factor scores, although South-Asian Surinamese, Turkish, and Moroccan groups showed higher levels of dependence than the Dutch origin group, genetic as well as environmental factors may account for the observed differences.


Asunto(s)
Grupos Étnicos/psicología , Estilo de Vida Saludable , Fumadores/psicología , Tabaquismo/etnología , Tabaquismo/psicología , Población Urbana/tendencias , Adulto , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Asiática/etnología , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Asiática/psicología , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Estilo de Vida Saludable/fisiología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Marruecos/etnología , Países Bajos/etnología , Estudios Prospectivos , Cese del Hábito de Fumar/etnología , Cese del Hábito de Fumar/psicología , Suriname/etnología , Tabaquismo/diagnóstico , Turquia/etnología
20.
BMC Infect Dis ; 18(1): 612, 2018 Dec 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30509189

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, there are strong disparities in Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) prevalence between ethnic groups. The current study aims to identify whether socioeconomic status, sexual risk behavior and sexual healthcare seeking behavior may explain differences in CT seroprevalence between ethnic groups. METHODS: We used 2011-2014 baseline data of the HELIUS (HEalthy LIfe in an Urban Setting) study, a multi-ethnic population-based cohort study in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, including participants from Dutch, African Surinamese, South-Asian Surinamese, Ghanaian, Moroccan and Turkish origin. For this analysis, we selected sexually active, heterosexual participants aged 18-34 years old. CT seroprevalence was determined using a multiplex serology assay. The CT seroprevalence ratios between different ethnicities are calculated and adjusted for potential indicators of socioeconomic status, sexual risk behavior and sexual healthcare seeking behavior. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 2001 individuals (52.8% female) with a median age of 28 years (IQR 24-31). CT seropositivity differed by ethnicities and ranged from 71.6% (African Surinamese), and 67.9% (Ghanaian) to 31.1% (Turkish). The CT seroprevalence ratio of African Surinamese was 1.72 (95% CI 1.43-2.06) and 1.52 (95% CI 1.16-1.99) of Ghanaian as compared to the Dutch reference group, after adjustment for socioeconomic status, sexual risk behavior and sexual healthcare seeking behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Indicators of socioeconomic status, sexual risk behavior, and sexual health seeking behavior could not explain the higher CT seroprevalence among African Surinamese and Ghanaian residents of Amsterdam.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Chlamydia/epidemiología , Chlamydia trachomatis , Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Asunción de Riesgos , Conducta Sexual , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Asia/etnología , Infecciones por Chlamydia/sangre , Infecciones por Chlamydia/etnología , Chlamydia trachomatis/inmunología , Chlamydia trachomatis/aislamiento & purificación , Estudios de Cohortes , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Ghana/etnología , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud/etnología , Heterosexualidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Marruecos/etnología , Países Bajos/epidemiología , Estudios Seroepidemiológicos , Conducta Sexual/etnología , Conducta Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Clase Social , Suriname/etnología , Turquia/etnología , Adulto Joven
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