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1.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 82(9): 6725, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30559501

RESUMEN

Objective. To develop and establish validity for a grading rubric to evaluate diabetes subjective, objective, assessment, plan (SOAP) note writing on primary care (PC) advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and to assess reliability and student perceptions of the rubric. Methods. Ten PC APPE faculty members collaborated to develop a rubric to provide formative and summative feedback on three written SOAP notes per APPE student over a 10-month period. Correlation analyses were conducted between rubric scores and three criterion variables to assess criterion-related validity: APPE grades, Pharmaceutical Care Ability Profile Scores, and Global Impression Scores. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability testing were completed using Cohen's kappa and Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC). Student perceptions were assessed through an anonymous student survey. Results. Fifty-one students and 167 SOAP notes were evaluated using the final rubric. The mean score significantly increased from the first to second SOAP note and from the first to third SOAP note. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between final rubric scores and criterion variables. The ICC for inter-rater reliability was fair (.59) for final rubric scores and excellent for intra-rater reliability (.98 to1.00). Students responded that the rubric improved their ability (84.9%) and confidence (92.4%) to write SOAP notes. Conclusion. The rubric may be used to make valid decisions about students' SOAP note writing ability and may increase their confidence in this area. The use of the rubric allows for greater reliability among multiple graders, supporting grading consistency.


Asunto(s)
Documentación/normas , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Docentes , Retroalimentación Formativa , Metas , Humanos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Escritura
2.
Ann Pharmacother ; 49(12): 1349-56, 2015 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26400007

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the existing data regarding the use of cranberry products for the prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in pediatric patients. DATA SOURCES: A literature search of Medline databases from 1966 to June 2015 was conducted. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: The databases were searched using the terms "pediatrics," "children," "cranberry," "cranberry juice," and "urinary tract infections." The identified trials were then searched for additional references applicable to this topic. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 8 clinical trials were identified that examined the use of cranberry products, mostly juice, for the prevention of UTIs in children. Three trials examined the use in otherwise healthy children. Five trials examined the use in pediatric patients with underlying urogenital abnormalities of which 2 compared cranberry to antibiotics. In healthy pediatric patients, cranberry use was associated with a reduction in the overall number of UTIs and a decrease in the number of antibiotic days per year for UTI treatment. In patients with urogenital abnormalities, results were conflicting, with some studies showing no reduction in UTIs compared with placebo, but others demonstrating a significant reduction. However, cranberry products had similar efficacy when compared with both cefaclor and trimethoprim. All studies used a wide variety of doses and frequencies of cranberry, making specific product recommendations difficult. CONCLUSIONS: Cranberry appears effective for the prevention of UTIs in otherwise healthy children and is at least as effective as antibiotics in children with underlying urogenital abnormalities. However, recommendations for cranberry dosing and frequency cannot be confidently made at this time. Larger, well-designed trials are recommended.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones Urinarias/prevención & control , Vaccinium macrocarpon , Antibacterianos/uso terapéutico , Bebidas , Niño , Frutas , Humanos , Fitoterapia
3.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 75(6): 122, 2011 Aug 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21931460

RESUMEN

The 2009-2010 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Council of Faculties Faculty Affairs Committee reviewed published literature assessing the scope and outcomes of faculty development for tenure and promotion. Relevant articles were identified via a PubMed search, review of pharmacy education journals, and identification of position papers from major healthcare professions academic organizations. While programs intended to enhance faculty development were described by some healthcare professions, relatively little specific to pharmacy has been published and none of the healthcare professions have adequately evaluated the impact of various faculty-development programs on associated outcomes.The paucity of published information strongly suggests a lack of outcomes-oriented faculty-development programs in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Substantial steps are required toward the development and scholarly evaluation of faculty-development programs. As these programs are developed and assessed, evaluations must encompass all faculty subgroups, including tenure- and nontenure track faculty members, volunteer faculty members, women, and underrepresented minorities. This paper proposes AACP, college and school, and department-level recommendations intended to ensure faculty success in achieving tenure and promotion.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia , Docentes , Facultades de Farmacia , Humanos , Desarrollo de Programa , Edición
4.
Ann Pharmacother ; 41(2): 185-92, 2007 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17284503

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Obesity, a national epidemic, is one of the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in the US. Pharmacists can play an integral role in weight management. Offering weight management services provides an opportunity to increase public awareness of pharmaceutical care and attract patients to pharmacy programs. OBJECTIVE: To describe the implementation and evaluate outcomes of a weight management pharmaceutical care service in a stand alone pharmaceutical care center on a college campus. METHODS: A retrospective review of data was conducted on 289 patient charts to evaluate the change in weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, and weight-related health conditions in patients who participated in the Healthy Habits program. RESULTS: The net change (change in values observed from first to last appointment) in weight was a loss of 1021.8 kg. The maximum weight change (change seen from the first appointment to the lowest value obtained during the program) was a loss of 1530.5 kg. These values correspond to a net mean weight loss of 3.6 kg per patient (10% of baseline weight) and a maximum mean weight loss per patient of 5.5 kg (15% of baseline weight). Eighty-three patients were able to decrease their BMI category and 76 patients had a decrease in risk status from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: The Auburn University Pharmaceutical Care Center's Healthy Habits program has been successful in helping patients decrease total body weight, BMI, and risk of weight-related complications. In addition, the program has increased the opportunity to identify other pharmaceutical care needs of patients and help establish the role of pharmacists in the management of obesity.


Asunto(s)
Obesidad/prevención & control , Servicios Farmacéuticos/organización & administración , Adulto , Fármacos Antiobesidad/administración & dosificación , Fármacos Antiobesidad/uso terapéutico , Índice de Masa Corporal , Peso Corporal/efectos de los fármacos , Peso Corporal/fisiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Monitoreo Fisiológico , Obesidad/dietoterapia , Obesidad/tratamiento farmacológico , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Servicios Farmacéuticos/provisión & distribución , Estudios Retrospectivos , Servicios de Salud para Estudiantes/organización & administración , Materiales de Enseñanza , Resultado del Tratamiento , Pérdida de Peso/efectos de los fármacos , Pérdida de Peso/fisiología
5.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 62(18): 1894-903, 2005 Sep 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16141109

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The equipment and methods used for ambulatory and home monitoring of blood pressure, lipids, coagulation, and weight management are discussed. SUMMARY: Over 100 million people in the United States have one or more chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. With the goal to improve health while reducing costs and the overall health care burden, ambulatory and home monitoring by pharmacists and patients are receiving more attention. Ambulatory and home monitoring of blood pressure, cholesterol, coagulation, and weight management (including devices for assessing overweight and obese patients, heart rate monitors, and pedometers) are convenient for clinicians and patients. Such monitoring provides pharmacists with an opportunity to differentiate their practices. Studies suggest that patients who are involved in ambulatory and home monitoring take a more active role in their health and may have better adherence to a prescribed diet and medication regimens. Studies also show that ambulatory and home monitoring, if done correctly, provide clinicians with a large quantity of reliable readings for future therapeutic decisions. Devices are also a means for pharmacists to increase their provision of pharmacy services. Ambulatory monitoring is billable in many clinic settings, and the devices can be a profitable addition to prescription services. CONCLUSION: Many devices are available to assist patients and clinicians in monitoring blood pressure, lipids, coagulation, and weight management. Familiarity with the devices will help in their proper selection and use.


Asunto(s)
Pruebas de Coagulación Sanguínea/instrumentación , Monitoreo Ambulatorio de la Presión Arterial/instrumentación , Peso Corporal/fisiología , Electrocardiografía Ambulatoria/instrumentación , Ergometría/instrumentación , Lípidos/sangre , Monitoreo Ambulatorio/instrumentación , Autocuidado/instrumentación , Coagulación Sanguínea/fisiología , Pruebas de Coagulación Sanguínea/economía , Pruebas de Coagulación Sanguínea/normas , Monitoreo Ambulatorio de la Presión Arterial/economía , Monitoreo Ambulatorio de la Presión Arterial/normas , Servicios Comunitarios de Farmacia , Electrocardiografía Ambulatoria/economía , Electrocardiografía Ambulatoria/normas , Ergometría/economía , Ergometría/normas , Frecuencia Cardíaca/fisiología , Humanos , Relación Normalizada Internacional/economía , Relación Normalizada Internacional/instrumentación , Relación Normalizada Internacional/normas , Monitoreo Ambulatorio/economía , Monitoreo Ambulatorio/normas , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Farmacéuticos , Tiempo de Protrombina/economía , Tiempo de Protrombina/instrumentación , Tiempo de Protrombina/normas , Autocuidado/economía , Autocuidado/normas , Caminata/fisiología
6.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 62(17): 1802-12, 2005 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16120741

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The equipment and methods used for ambulatory and home monitoring of blood pressure, lipids, coagulation, and weight management are discussed. SUMMARY: Over 100 million people in the United States have one or more chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. With the goal to improve health while reducing costs and the overall health care burden, ambulatory and home monitoring by pharmacists and patients are receiving more attention. Ambulatory and home monitoring of blood pressure, cholesterol, coagulation, and weight management (including devices for assessing overweight and obese patients, heart rate monitors, and pedometers) are convenient for clinicians and patients. Such monitoring provides pharmacists with an opportunity to differentiate their practices. Studies suggest that patients who are involved in ambulatory and home monitoring take a more active role in their health and may have better adherence to prescribed diet and medication regimens. Studies also show that ambulatory and home monitoring, if done correctly, provide clinicians with a large quantity of reliable readings for future therapeutic decisions. Devices are also a means for pharmacists to increase their provision of pharmacy services. Ambulatory monitoring is billable in many clinic settings, and the devices can be a profitable addition to prescription services. CONCLUSION: Many devices are available to assist patients and clinicians in monitoring blood pressure, lipids, coagulation, and weight management. Familiarity with the devices will help in their proper selection and use.


Asunto(s)
Monitoreo Ambulatorio de la Presión Arterial/instrumentación , Servicios Comunitarios de Farmacia/tendencias , Equipos y Suministros/economía , Lípidos/sangre , Atención Ambulatoria/economía , Atención Ambulatoria/tendencias , Monitoreo Ambulatorio de la Presión Arterial/tendencias , Servicios Comunitarios de Farmacia/economía , Diseño de Equipo , Equipos y Suministros/normas , Humanos
7.
Ann Pharmacother ; 39(3): 555-8, 2005 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-15701771

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To report a case of possible beta-antagonist-induced thrombocytopenia. CASE SUMMARY: A 44-year-old African American woman with systemic lupus erythematosus developed thrombocytopenia. Splenic sequestration was suspected, but the rise in platelets after splenectomy was temporary. Bacterial and viral etiologies were ruled out, since thrombocytopenia continued 6 months after splenectomy. Her medications acetaminophen, amitriptyline, amlodipine, beta-antagonists, and diphenhydramine were suspected. Nadolol and labetalol were started immediately prior to splenectomy. Six months after splenectomy, the woman was hospitalized for pneumonia; the platelet count was 50 x 10(3)/mm(3). Nadolol was discontinued on day 2. Within 24 hours, the platelet count rose to 128 x 10(3)/mm(3) and exceeded 200 x 10(3)/mm(3) by day 7. Labetalol was discontinued on day 8, but no additional significant rise occurred. The patient developed thrombocytopenia one year later when placed on nadolol and famotidine during admission for a gastrointestinal bleed. The platelet count decreased during the admission. Both drugs were discontinued after the last platelet count (100 x 10(3)/mm(3)). The platelet count had normalized by the follow-up visit 16 days later and remained normal until the patient's death almost a year later. DISCUSSION: Thrombocytopenia is not a common adverse effect of beta-antagonist therapy. As of February 1, 2005, only 4 case reports of suspected beta-antagonist-associated thrombocytopenia have been published in English, and the medications cited are unavailable within the US. After splenectomy, the thrombocytopenia might have resolved if the beta-antagonists had not been present. Since thrombocytopenia resolved within 24 hours of discontinuation of nadolol, it is likely that the continued thrombocytopenia was beta-antagonist induced. The likelihood that the beta-antagonist caused the adverse event is possible according to the Naranjo probability scale. CONCLUSIONS: The temporal association between the discontinuation of nadolol and the rise in platelets suggests that the thrombocytopenia resulted from nadolol.


Asunto(s)
Antagonistas Adrenérgicos beta/efectos adversos , Labetalol/efectos adversos , Nadolol/efectos adversos , Trombocitopenia/inducido químicamente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico/complicaciones , Esplenectomía , Trombocitopenia/etiología
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