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2.
AIDS Behav ; 2021 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33860408

RESUMEN

Sexual agreements are an important element of HIV prevention for many partnered gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM). This study describes sexual agreement and sexual behavior changes during the 2020 pandemic among a sample of 215 coupled US GBMSM. Overall, reported behavior shifted towards monogamy. Fifteen percent of respondents developed/ended/changed their agreement during the pandemic; the pandemic factored into 85% of reported changes. Individuals reported fewer outside sexual partners compared to the 3 months pre-pandemic. More research is needed to investigate shifting behavior and associated risk in order to adapt HIV services during the pandemic.

3.
J Interpers Violence ; : 886260521997454, 2021 Mar 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33678032

RESUMEN

Stay at home orders-intended to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by limiting social contact-have forced people to remain in their homes. The additional stressors created by the need to stay home and socially isolate may act as triggers to intimate partner violence (IPV). In this article, we present data from a recent online cross-sectional survey with gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in the United States to illustrate changes in IPV risks that have occurred during the U.S. COVID-19 epidemic. The Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May 2020. GBMSM were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, recruiting a sample size of 696 GBMSM. Analysis considers changes in victimization and perpetration of IPV during the 3 months prior to the survey (March-May 2020) that represents the first 3 months of lockdown during the COVID-19 epidemic. During the period March-May 2020, 12.6% of participants reported experiencing any IPV with higher rates of emotional IPV (10.3%) than sexual (2.2%) or physical (1.8%) IPV. Of those who reported IPV victimization during lockdown, for almost half this was their first time experience: 5.3% reported the IPV they experienced happened for the first time during the past 3 months (0.8% physical, 2.13% sexual, and 3.3% emotional). Reporting of perpetration of IPV during lockdown was lower: only 6% reported perpetrating any IPV, with perpetration rates of 1.5% for physical, 0.5% for sexual, and 5.3% for emotional IPV. Of those who reported perpetration of IPV during lockdown, very small percentages reported that this was the first time they had perpetrated IPV: 0.9% for any IPV (0.2% physical, 0.2% sexual, and 0.6% emotional). The results illustrate an increased need for IPV resources for GBMSM during these times of increased stress and uncertainty, and the need to find models of resource and service delivery that can work inside of social distancing guidelines while protecting the confidentiality and safety of those who are experiencing IPV.

4.
J Interpers Violence ; : 8862605211001472, 2021 Mar 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33729057

RESUMEN

There has been a growth in research illustrating that gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) experience intimate partner violence (IPV) at rates that are comparable to those among heterosexual women. However, the majority of research on IPV among same-sex male couples has focused on adults, and research on the experience of IPV among younger men (those aged under 18), remains at a nascent stage, despite knowledge that IPV is often common among younger men. This article adds to the growing body of literature on IPV among young GBMSM (YGBMSM) through of an analysis of qualitative data from in-depth interviews (IDI) with GBMSM aged 15-19 (n = 30) in romantic relationships partnerships. The study sought to explore issues of relationship development, relationship contexts, and understandings of IPV. More than one-half of the sample reported experiencing some form of IPV in their current or past relationships. Participants described a range of experiences of IPV, including physical IPV, emotional IPV, sexual IPV, and controlling behaviors. Emotional IPV in the form of negative comments and controlling behaviors such as jealousy were the most commonly reported forms of violence behaviors. Although few participants reported experiencing physical or sexual IPV, several discussed concerns about giving, and partners' acknowledging, sexual consent. Antecedents to IPV included wanting or feeling pressured to participate in normative development milestones, short-lived relationships, and societal stigma. Interventions that develop content on IPV and that reflect the lived realities of YGBMSM who are experiencing their first relationships are urgently needed. Study findings also support the need for training teachers, health care providers, and parents to identify signs of IPV and provide them with the knowledge and skills to talk to YGBMSM about relationships and violence to reduce IPV.

5.
AIDS Behav ; 2021 Feb 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33630199

RESUMEN

Engagement in HIV care and a high level of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence for people living with HIV is crucial to treatment success and can minimize the population burden of the disease. Despite this, there is a critical gap in HIV prevention science around the development of interventions for serodiscordant male couples. This paper reports on the results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of Stronger Together, a dyadic counseling intervention aimed at increasing engagement in and optimizing HIV care among serodiscordant male couples in Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA, and Chicago, IL. Between 2014 and 2017, 159 male serodiscordant couples (total N = 318) in Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA, and Chicago, IL were enrolled and equally randomized to either the Stronger Together intervention arm (a three-session dyadic intervention involving HIV testing and adherence counseling) or a standard of care (SOC) control arm. Couples completed individual study assessments via an audio computer assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) system at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Primary outcomes included being prescribed and currently taking ART, and fewer missed doses of ART in the past 30 days; because the trial was not powered to examine viral suppression, we examined this as an exploratory outcome. Longitudinal data analysis was by an intention-to-treat approach. Participants ages ranged from 18 to 69 (mean = 35.9), and are predominantly white (77.5%), and college educated (68.4% earned a college degree or higher). Participants randomized to the Stronger Together arm had a significantly greater odds of being prescribed and currently taking ART over time than those in the SOC arm (at 12 months OR 2.75, 95%CI 1.35-4.67, p-value 0.020, and at 18 months OR 2.91, 95%CI 1.61-4.88, p-value 0.013). Similarly, those in the Stronger Together arm had a significantly lower odds of missing a dose of ART in the past 30 days over time compared to those in the SOC arm (at 12 months OR 0.28, 95%CI 0.09-0.81, p-value 0.019, and at 18 months OR 0.25, 95%CI 0.07-0.82, p-value 0.023). Among male couples in serodiscordant relationships, the Stronger Together intervention resulted in significantly improved HIV treatment outcomes at both 12 and 18 months of follow-up. This trial is the first to date to demonstrate evidence of efficacy for a dyadic counseling intervention and has the potential to fill a critical gap in secondary HIV prevention interventions for serodiscordant male couples.

6.
Arch Sex Behav ; 50(3): 1067-1086, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33564980

RESUMEN

Coupled gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) are at particularly high risk for HIV, and a clear understanding of behavioral risk is key to effective interventions. Accurate behavioral self-reports are a crucial component of valid sexual health research, yet reliability of these data remains understudied. This study aimed to quantify and identify predictors of dyadic discordance in reported 3-month anal intercourse (AI) occurrence and frequency. Using cross-sectional data from 407 male couples in the U.S. (2016-2017), we calculated proportional dyadic concordance and used dyad-level logistic and linear regression to identify demographic, behavioral, and relationship traits associated with the odds of discordant frequency reports and the relative difference between discordant partner reports. Couples had high levels of concordant reports of 3-month anal AI occurrence (97%) but low interpartner agreement in reported frequency (37%). After adjustment, the odds of discordance were significantly associated with dyadic employment and differences on the Communal Coping to Reduce HIV Threat Scale (CCS) (p < .05). Among frequency-discordant couples, the mean relative difference between partner reports was 52.80% ± 35.91% (M ± SD). After adjustment, relative differences between partners' reported AI frequencies were positively associated with interpartner differences in CCS (p < .05). These results indicate that among GBMSM couples in committed partnerships, self-reported sexual behavior data may be impacted by granularity, recall, and relationship characteristics. Further research in this area is warranted to better understand measurement error in self-reported sexual activity data.

7.
Lancet ; 397(10279): 1095-1106, 2021 Mar 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33617774

RESUMEN

The HIV epidemic in the USA began as a bicoastal epidemic focused in large cities but, over nearly four decades, the epidemiology of HIV has changed. Public health surveillance data can inform an understanding of the evolution of the HIV epidemic in terms of the populations and geographical areas most affected. We analysed publicly available HIV surveillance data and census data to describe: current HIV prevalence and new HIV diagnoses by region, race or ethnicity, and age; trends in HIV diagnoses over time by HIV acquisition risk and age; and the distribution of HIV prevalence by geographical area. We reviewed published literature to explore the reasons for the current distribution of HIV cases and important disparities in HIV prevalence. We identified opportunities to improve public health surveillance systems and uses of data for planning and monitoring public health responses. The current US HIV epidemic is marked by geographical concentration in the US South and profound disparities between regions and by race or ethnicity. Rural areas vary in HIV prevalence; rural areas in the South are more likely to have a high HIV prevalence than rural areas in other US Census regions. Ongoing disparities in HIV in the South are probably driven by the restricted expansion of Medicaid, health-care provider shortages, low health literacy, and HIV stigma. HIV diagnoses overall declined in 2009-18, but HIV diagnoses among individuals aged 25-34 years increased during the same period. HIV diagnoses decreased for all risk groups in 2009-18; among men who have sex with men (MSM), new diagnoses decreased overall and for White MSM, remained stable for Black MSM, and increased for Hispanic or Latino MSM. Surveillance data indicate profound and ongoing disparities in HIV cases, with disproportionate impact among people in the South, racial or ethnic minorities, and MSM.

8.
AIDS Behav ; 2021 Jan 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33389373

RESUMEN

There is strong evidence that gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in African countries experience high prevalence of HIV. However, missing from the literature is an understanding of the HIV risk behaviors and prevention needs of partnered GBMSM in African countries. The Together Tomorrow project sampled 440 partnered GBMSM (220 couples) in South Africa and Namibia. Prevalence of HIV was high at 42%, with 33% of men in sero-discordant relationships. Despite high levels of HIV testing in the past 6 months (65%), condom use with main and outside sex partners was low. Men reported low levels of willingness to use pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) (16%). HIV testing in the past 12 months and willingness to use PrEP were significantly associated with recent binge drinking and substance use. Men in sero-discordant relationships, those with sexual agreements and those who had experienced any form of IPV were all less likely to report that they had recently tested for HIV. There is a need to develop interventions that meet the unique needs of African partnered GBMSM and tackle stigma and discrimination as drivers of HIV risk in these settings.

9.
AIDS Behav ; 2021 Jan 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33507455

RESUMEN

Partnered gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) are less likely to engage in HIV and STI testing. We enrolled 51 male couples from a larger study of home HIV testing to test the feasibility of a dyadic home STI testing intervention delivered via telehealth, consisting of two telehealth sessions delivered via video-chat. In the first session, an interventionist demonstrated the specimen collection kits. In the second session, an interventionist delivered the STI results. Participants reported very high levels of acceptability of the intervention: 92% reported the telehealth calls quality as very good, 99% reported the sample collection instructions were clear, and 96% of respondents returned specimens for collection. 9% of participants tested positive for chlamydia or gonorrhea, and all were linked to care. The intervention has the potential to surmount economic, physical and stigma-related barriers to attending clinics for STI testing, but these results need to be further tested in more diverse samples of male couples.

10.
JMIR Form Res ; 5(2): e26130, 2021 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33459278

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The high global prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and its association with poor physical and mental health underscore the need for effective primary prevention. We previously developed Ghya Bharari Ekatra (GBE), a couples-based primary prevention intervention for IPV among newly married couples residing in slum communities in Pune, India. OBJECTIVE: Through this pilot study, we aimed to explore the acceptance, safety, feasibility, and preliminary efficacy of GBE. METHODS: Between January and May 2018, we enrolled and assigned 20 couples to receive GBE plus information on IPV support services and 20 control couples to receive information on IPV support services alone. The GBE intervention was delivered over 6 weekly sessions to groups of 3 to 5 couples by lay peer educators in the communities in which the participants resided. Intervention components addressed relationship quality, resilience, communication and conflict negotiation, self-esteem, sexual communication and sexual health knowledge, and norms around IPV. Outcome evaluation included exit interviews with participants and peers to examine acceptance and feasibility challenges and baseline and 3-month follow-up interviews to examine change in IPV reporting and mental health (by women) and alcohol misuse (by men). The process evaluation examined dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, recruitment, participation rate, and context. RESULTS: Half (40/83) of the eligible couples approached agreed to participate in the GBE intervention. Retention rates were high (17/20, 85% across all 6 sessions), feedback from exit interviews suggested the content and delivery methods were very well received, and the community was highly supportive of the intervention. The principal feasibility challenge involved recruiting men with the lowest income who were dependent on daily wages. No safety concerns were reported by female participants over the course of the intervention or at the 3-month follow-up. There were no reported physical or sexual IPV events in either group, but there were fewer incidents of psychological abuse in GBE participants (3/17, 18%) versus control participants (4/16, 25%) at 3-month follow-up. There was also significant improvement in the overall mental health of female intervention participants and declines in the control participants (change in mean General Health Questionnaire-12 score: -0.13 in intervention vs 0.13 in controls; P=.10). CONCLUSIONS: GBE has high acceptance, feasibility, and preliminary efficacy in preventing IPV and improving mental health among women. Next steps include refining the intervention content based on pilot findings and examining intervention efficacy through a large-scale randomized trial with longer follow-up. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03332134; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03332134. Clinical Trials Registry of India CTRI/2018/01/011596; http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/pmaindet2.php?trialid=21443. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/11533.

11.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 24(1): e25664, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33481359

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is available and recommended for men who have sex with men (MSM) at risk for HIV infection. Other HIV prevention products are being developed, including long-acting injectable (LAI) and event-based oral and topical formulations. Understanding preferences for potential products by MSM can help direct further development of prevention messaging. METHODS: We present baseline data from HIV-negative participants enrolled in the US Mobile Messaging for Men (M-cubed) Study. Participants were asked their likelihood of and rank order preference for using daily oral PrEP and various potential prevention products (one- to -three-month injections, 2-1-1 sexual event oral dosing, anal or penile gel, or anal suppository), and their sociodemographic characteristics. Bivariate and multivariable logistics regression assessed demographic associations with likelihood of use and rank order preference. RESULTS: Overall, most MSM reported a likelihood of using LAI (74%), sexual event-based pills (67%) and penile gel (64%). Men who reported recent unprotected (condomless and PrEPless) anal sex most preferred a penile gel formulation (74%), followed closely by LAI and event-based pills (73% each). Current PrEP users (vs. non-users) had greater odds of reporting likelihood to use LAI (AOR = 3.29, 95% CI = 2.12 to 5.11), whereas men reporting recent unprotected anal sex had a greater odds of likelihood to use a penile gel (AOR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.27 to 2.52) and an anal suppository (AOR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.02). Hispanic/Latino (vs. White) MSM (AOR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.40 to 3.73) and, marginally, Black MSM (AOR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.00 to 2.38) had greater odds of reporting likelihood to use penile gel. Similar patterns were found for rank ordering preference of products, including condoms. CONCLUSIONS: Most MSM were interested in using various potential future HIV prevention products, especially LAI. However, two typologies of potential users emerged: men who prefer sexual event-based methods (condoms, event-based pill, sexual gels and suppositories) and men who prefer non-sexual event-based methods (daily pill, LAI). Men who reported recent unprotected anal sex preferred a penile gel product most, followed closely by sexual event-based pills and LAI. Racial/ethnic differences were noted as well. These findings on product preferences can help in formulation development and messaging.

12.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 10(2): e21985, 2021 Feb 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33320821

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The US HIV epidemic is driven by infections in men who have sex with men and characterized by profound disparities in HIV prevalence and outcomes for Black Americans. Black men who have sex with men living with HIV are reported to have worse care outcomes than other men who have sex with men, but the reasons for these health inequities are not clear. We planned a prospective observational cohort study to help understand the reasons for worse HIV care outcomes for Black versus White men who have sex with men in Atlanta. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to identify individual, dyadic, network, neighborhood, and structural factors that explain disparities in HIV viral suppression between Black and White men who have sex with men living with HIV in Atlanta. METHODS: Black and White men who have sex with men living with HIV were enrolled in a prospective cohort study with in-person visits and viral suppression assessments at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months; additional surveys of care and risk behaviors at 3, 6, and 18 months; analysis of care received outside the study through public health reporting; and qualitative interviews for participants who experienced sentinel health events (eg, loss of viral suppression) during the study. The study is based on the Bronfenbrenner socioecological theoretical model. RESULTS: Men who have sex with men (n=400) were enrolled between June 2016 and June 2017 in Atlanta. Follow-up was completed in June 2019; final study retention was 80% at 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: Health disparities for Black men who have sex with men are hypothesized to be driven by structural racism and barriers to care. Observational studies are important to document and quantify the specific factors within the socioecological framework that account for disparities in viral suppression. In the meantime, it is also critical to push for steps to improve access to care, including Medicaid expansion in Southern states, such as Georgia, which have not yet moved to expand Medicaid. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/21985.

13.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 86(1): 38-45, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027155

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Men who have sex with men are disproportionately burdened by HIV/AIDS, and the advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has provided an effective strategy to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Research has shown that improving one partner's health-promoting behaviors increases the likelihood that their partner adopts healthier behaviors. We examined the longitudinal relationship between favorable HIV treatment outcomes with current PrEP use among HIV serodiscordant male partners. SETTING: Data are from Project Stronger Together, a randomized controlled trial that recruited serodiscordant male couples from Atlanta, GA; Boston, MA; and Chicago, IL. METHODS: Serodiscordant couples completed assessments at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We analyzed longitudinal data from 120 HIV serodiscordant male partners to assess the relationship between the HIV-negative partner's current PrEP use and their HIV-positive partner's current ART use, ART adherence, and viral load using generalized estimating equation models. RESULTS: Fewer than half of the HIV-negative partners were on PrEP at baseline and nearly two-thirds of their HIV-positive partners were virally suppressed. HIV-negative male partners who had partners with an undetectable viral load had greater odds of being a current PrEP user than HIV-negative partners with partners with a detectable viral load. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights the need to develop dyad-level interventions to improve HIV medication use/adherence by HIV serodiscordant male couples. Our findings also suggest that dyad-level interventions may be able to leverage our understanding of how partners can influence each other's health-promoting behaviors to develop programs that improve health outcomes for both partners.

14.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 9(11): e23819, 2020 Nov 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33242022

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is approximately twice as prevalent among transgender and gender diverse individuals (those whose current gender identity does not match their sex assigned at birth) than among cisgender individuals (those whose gender aligns with their sex assigned at birth). However, most existing scales measuring IPV are not validated among transgender and gender diverse populations and do not consider the unique forms of IPV experienced by transgender and gender diverse individuals. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the protocol for Project Empower, a study that seeks to develop and validate a new scale to measure IPV as experienced by transgender and gender diverse adults. A new scale is necessary to improve the accuracy of IPV measurement among transgender and gender diverse populations and may inform the current tools used to screen and link to services for transgender and gender diverse adults who experience or perpetrate IPV. METHODS: The proposed new scale will be developed by a linear three-phase process. In Phase I, we will recruit a maximum of 110 transgender and gender diverse participants to participate in in-depth interviews and focus groups. Phase I will collect qualitative data on the experiences of IPV among transgender and gender individuals. After generating scale items from the qualitative data in Phase I, Phase II will conduct up to 10 cognitive interviews to examine understanding of scale items and refine wording. Phase III will then conduct a survey with an online recruited sample of 700 transgender and gender diverse individuals to validate the scale using factor analysis and examine the prevalence, antecedents, and linked health outcomes of IPV. This study will generate the first comprehensive IPV scale including trans-specific IPV tactics that has undergone robust mixed-methods validation for use in transgender and gender diverse populations, regardless of sex assigned at birth. RESULTS: Project Empower launched in August 2019, with Phases I and II expected to be complete by late 2020. Phase III (survey of 700 transgender individuals) is expected to be launched in January 2021. CONCLUSIONS: A scale that more accurately captures the forms of IPV experienced by transgender and gender diverse people not only has the potential to lead to more accurate measurements of prevalence but also can identify unique forms of violence that may form the basis of IPV prevention interventions. Additionally, identifying the forms of IPV experienced by transgender and gender diverse people has the potential to lead to the refinement of clinical screening tools used to identify and refer those who experience and perpetrate violence in clinical settings. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/23819.

16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33137221

RESUMEN

Mentoring relationships are characterized by a sustained, high quality, and skill-building relationship between a protégé and mentor (Handbook of Youth Mentoring, Los Angeles, SAGE, 2014). Within prevention science, youth mentoring programs emphasize creating a specific context that benefits a young person. Program-sponsored relationships between youth and adults allow for creating a mentor-mentee partnership, but do not require the establishment of a strong bond in order to deliver prevention-focused activities and experiences (Handbook of Youth Mentoring, Los Angeles, SAGE, 2014). Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a counseling style used widely to promote health behavior change and in prevention interventions. As part of an upstream approach to HIV prevention, we combined mentoring and MI by training peer mentors to use MI skills in their interactions as part of a large RCT of a mobile life skills intervention for adolescent men who have sex with men (AMSM). Our training model developed for training peer mentors in MI skills resulted in peers reaching and exceeding established MI fidelity thresholds (e.g., mean percentage of complex reflections = 80%, mean reflection to question ratio = 2.2:1). We offer reflections on lessons learned and future directions for those researchers and practitioners who may benefit from adapting this blended approach for mentoring AMSM.

17.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 216: 108318, 2020 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33022531

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The association between drug use and condomless anal sex (CAS) is well documented among sexual minority men (SMM). Less is known about whether this association generalizes to marijuana and across relationship status and sexual agreements groups (single, partnered monogamous, partnered open -outside partners permitted, and partnered monogamish -outside partners permitted when main partners are together). METHODS: A nationwide sample of SMM (N = 65,707) were recruited through a geosocial networking app between November 2017 and November 2019. Participants reported on drug use and instances of CAS with casual partners in the previous 30 days. RESULTS: Both marijuana and club drug use were associated with the occurrence of CAS with casual partners among single men. Only club drug use was associated with CAS frequency in this group. The association between marijuana and the occurrence of CAS did not differ significantly among monogamous men, while the associations between club drug use and the occurrence as well as frequency of CAS were significantly weaker. Meanwhile, the associations between club drug use and the occurrence as well as frequency of CAS did not differ significantly between single and non-monogamous (open and monogamish) subgroups; however, the association between marijuana and the occurrence of CAS was significantly weaker. CONCLUSIONS: Findings largely replicated the robust association between club drug use and CAS with casual partners. They support the assertion that marijuana use predicts sexual risk for some SMM subgroups. Finally, they illustrate the potential for relationship status - and sexual agreements - to contextualize associations between drug use and CAS.

18.
Violence Against Women ; : 1077801220963906, 2020 Oct 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33081630

RESUMEN

Microcredit has shown mixed results when used to reduce intimate partner violence (IPV). This study explored microcredit and IPV in Bangladesh by conducting 12 focus groups with married men and women. Participants described challenges to microcredit participation highlighting "missed opportunities" for reducing IPV, including needs to (a) prevent violence sparked by loan disputes, (b) incorporate skill development to improve women's agency as a means of reducing IPV, and (c) mindfully engage men in the loan process to help address men's unequal gender ideologies. These modifications to microcredit programs are proposed to maximize positive change on gender and IPV.

19.
AIDS Behav ; 2020 Sep 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32975615

RESUMEN

Young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YGBMSM) are a priority population for HIV prevention efforts. Although there has been a growing focus on dyadic HIV prevention interventions for same-gender male couples, the unique needs of partnered YGBMSM have been largely overlooked. In this qualitative study, we explored partnered YGBMSM's perceptions of existing HIV prevention interventions to inform the design of a relationship-focused HIV prevention intervention. Between July and November 2018, we conducted in-depth interviews with 30 young partnered YGBMSM (mean age = 17.8, SD = 1.1). Participants described that interventions were needed to address skills regarding: (1) implicit versus explicit communication about sexual agreements; (2) boundary setting and identifying signs of abusive relationships; and (3) relationship dynamics (e.g., trust). Participants noted the absence of inclusive sexual education for them; thus, findings suggest that the provision of relationship skills training are requisites for HIV prevention interventions with YGBMSM in the US.

20.
Am J Mens Health ; 14(5): 1557988320957545, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32938298

RESUMEN

While there is evidence of variations in the risk perceptions of COVID-19 and that they are linked to both engagement in health-protective behaviors and poor mental health outcomes, there has been a lack of attention to how individuals perceive the risk of COVID-19 relative to other infectious diseases. This paper examines the relative perceptions of the severity of COVID-19 and HIV among a sample of U.S. gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSMs). The "Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19" survey was conducted online from April 2020 to May 2020. GBMSMs were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, resulting in a sample size of 696. The analysis considers differences in responses to two scales: the Perceived Severity of HIV Infection and the Perceived Severity of COVID-19 Infection. Participants perceived greater seriousness for HIV infection (mean 46.67, range 17-65) than for COVID-19 infection (mean 38.81, range 13-62). Some items reflecting more proximal impacts of infection (anxiety, loss of sleep, and impact on employment) were similar for HIV and COVID-19. Those aged over 25 and those who perceived higher prevalence of COVID-19 in the United States or their state were more likely to report COVID-19 as more severe than HIV. There is a need to develop nuanced public health messages for GBMSMs that convey the ongoing simultaneous health threats of both HIV and COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Homosexualidad Masculina/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Asunción de Riesgos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Bisexualidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Incidencia , Internet , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Medición de Riesgo , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Conducta Sexual , Análisis de Supervivencia , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
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